The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Food  % width posts: 62

Poland-Tea or coffee land?


mafketis 34 | 11,904
27 Oct 2021 #31
Even in the PRL years coffee was widely available and drunk in most households.

Like most things in the PRL coffee was.... kind of available but often hard to get and definitely taken for granted as something that was always on the shelf.

That's one reason Inka aka 'kawa zbożowa' (grain coffee) was a thing then. To me inka tastes like weak coffee mixed with tea.... but like many poverty foods some developed a taste for it and it's still available.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inka_(drink)
jon357 71 | 20,468
27 Oct 2021 #32
That's how I learned to make it in Poland and that's how I drink it myself.

Me too, if I'm not at home using the machine, and even then, sometimes. It's properly brewed that way, and if milk or cream is added, always seems to make even the cheapest coffee taste luxurious.

Coffee here is certainly not a 'posh' thing at all, especially made like that. You'll find 'parzona' coffee being made on every building site.

Even in the PRL years coffee was widely available

This is true. Mostly I think imported from Brazil. Poland has a few big coffee roasting plants that were open right through the PRL years. The one in Poznań is huge.
pawian 188 | 17,916
27 Oct 2021 #33
Even in the PRL years coffee was widely available and drunk in most households.

Nope. In times of the most severe crisis of early 1980s, coffee was rationed and even that wasn`t enough to fully satisfy the demand. That is why communists propagated Inka - coffee substitute made from roasted chicory roots.
pawian 188 | 17,916
30 Oct 2021 #34
Inka - coffee substitute

It is amazing that it is still produced today. Various kinds. E.g., coconut. Amazing. I love capitalism.



OP Alien 8 | 1,285
31 Oct 2021 #35
Inka as coffee substitute. Is it vegan? It woul'd be a hit by proper adv. And it is Polish. I like capitalism too. For ex..pl the best sparkling wine i Germany is Rotkäppchen and it is old brand from East Germany.
mafketis 34 | 11,904
31 Oct 2021 #36
It woul'd be a hit by proper adv

have you tasted it? Like I said back in #31, it tastes like tea made in a cup with coffee grounds... not a fan.
Atch 17 | 4,086
31 Oct 2021 #37
Nope. In times of the most severe crisis of early 1980s

What about the rest of the time? I know enough older Polish people who remember drinking coffee. They used to buy coffee beans and grind them - and these were just ordinary people, not especially privileged with 'contacts' or buying from the black market.

Inka as coffee substitute.

People didn't regard Inka as any form of coffee.

It is amazing that it is still produced today.

People often retain a nostalgic affection for the taste of food and drink that they associate with their past.
mafketis 34 | 11,904
31 Oct 2021 #38
People didn't regard Inka as any form of coffee.

Another name for it is "kawa zbożowa".... Inka was the most famous brand but there were others too.

older Polish people who remember drinking coffee

It was kind of like meat, sort of available but often hard to find and often saved for special occasions. It wasn't a standard daily drink for many/most people.
Atch 17 | 4,086
31 Oct 2021 #39
According to the Oracle - Mr Atch :)) - he is puzzled by the narrative that coffee was a luxury or in short supply because during his childhood he never observed any shortage of coffee. In his own words 'it was a bog standard thing' routinely drunk in most households. He says that it was always coffee beans put in the grinder and that he never remembers seeing packs of ground coffee. Could it be that ground coffee was a luxury and the 'raw' beans could be purchased? He says he never saw his mother or grandmother without their coffee cups and cigarettes. He says he recalls such things as citrus fruits and chocolate being a rare luxury, but never coffee. He says Inka was not drunk because of coffee shortages but as a kind of 'decaff coffee'. He lived in Mazowieckie. Maybe it's a regional thing?
mafketis 34 | 11,904
31 Oct 2021 #40
during his childhood

What decade are we talking about? Is he (are you) older than I'd imagined?
pawian 188 | 17,916
31 Oct 2021 #41
What about the rest of the time?

The rest of time was OK and coffee was expensive but available (beans - I remember my parents grinding them in a special mixer from East Germany). I corrected you about early 1980s, before and after the martial law.

People often retain a nostalgic affection

Yes.

It wasn't a standard daily drink for many/most people.

Yes. Most people didn`t drink 3, 4 cups per day like some do today coz there wasn`t enough coffee and it cost a lot.
jon357 71 | 20,468
31 Oct 2021 #42
Here's something about the coffee roasting plant in Poznan. Opened 1973.
pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poznańska_Palarnia_Kawy_"Astra"

Among other things, it says that during the 70s and 80s, Poland roasted 25,000 tonnes of coffee per year, a third of that in Poznan.
pawian 188 | 17,916
31 Oct 2021 #43
Talking about coffee in communist times, one thing should be mentioned - a packet of coffee was an attractive present or even a bribe, sometimes better than real money. When it was unavailable in regular shops, one could buy it for hard currency in Pewex shops which sold foreign goods but Polish ones, too.

One day my parents got a can of foreign Nescafe and later, since my early childhood, I could see that can standing proudly on display in the kitchen. For decades. :):)



OP Alien 8 | 1,285
20 Dec 2021 #44
As I was young in communist times in Poland it was usual to drink black tea with sugar and a slice of lemon. Coffee was only good for old people ( over 30...)
OP Alien 8 | 1,285
12 Jun 2022 #45
What is better the day after? A cup of tea or a mug of coffee?
jon357 71 | 20,468
12 Jun 2022 #46
coffee

Always coffee however tea is better for a hangover.
Bobko 11 | 1,007
12 Jun 2022 #47
Whaaaaaaat? I thought only I had this figured out.

Darkest of black teas, judicious use of lemon - two cups of - back to work.
jon357 71 | 20,468
12 Jun 2022 #48
Darkest of black teas

I've known people in Warsaw, big drinkers, who use black coffee with lemon juice as a hangover cure.
Bobko 11 | 1,007
12 Jun 2022 #49
I've known people in Warsaw

There is proof, then, for our commonality. Each Pole and each Russian carries within himself a blueprint of the original hard drinking Slav.
Lenka 3 | 2,765
12 Jun 2022 #50
teas, judicious use of lemon - two cups of - back to work.

I was having On hot tea, one ice tea, one hot, one ice...and so on. My hangovers are a whole day affair :D
jon357 71 | 20,468
12 Jun 2022 #51
Wait a few years and they'll become two day hangovers.
Lenka 3 | 2,765
12 Jun 2022 #52
I don't drink much nowadays. Although when I was in Kraków in October I drunk few beers and felt awful the next day
jon357 71 | 20,468
12 Jun 2022 #53
I don't drink much nowadays

Same.

A couple of beers, occasionally at three at most or I really pay for it later.

Vodka, rarely nowadays and wine only with food.
mafketis 34 | 11,904
12 Jun 2022 #54
I don't drink much nowadays.

Anymore I pretty much drink wine or beer only with food (and cook with wine sometimes)

I have vodka only with tatar (disinfectant)

I sip at something stronger (gin or bourbon lately) while watching movies (no more than twice a week usually)
jon357 71 | 20,468
14 Jun 2022 #55
Quality is always better than quantity.

gin

I enjoy a gin and tonic before meals.

It's hard to get slimline tonic (sugar free) in Poland however a decade ago it was hard to get tonic at all.

The same with extra dry vermouth. People's tastes in PŁ tend to be for the sweet stuff.
jon357 71 | 20,468
14 Jun 2022 #56
I sometimes see electric coffee in Poland. A black coffee with brandy in.
OP Alien 8 | 1,285
14 Jun 2022 #57
It's like Schnaps Kaffee in Switzerland.

Yesterday 37 degrees in the shade. Ice tea takes on a new meaning.
jon357 71 | 20,468
20 Jun 2022 #58
Have you tried sparkling tea?

It's the new non alcoholic alternative to champagne. Fortnums sell it for £18. When I'm back home in Warsaw I might put some tea through the sodastream and then add some booze to make it drinkable.
OP Alien 8 | 1,285
20 Jun 2022 #59
I prefer Schweppes with eis.
jon357 71 | 20,468
20 Jun 2022 #60
Schweppes

Schweppes what?

Ginger Ale, Tonic, Schweppes Gold?


Home / Food / Poland-Tea or coffee land?
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.