The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Food  % width posts: 44

Poland-Tea or coffee land?


Alien 7 | 1,076
26 Oct 2021 #1
What do you think?. Is Poland tee or coffee land. I drink only one cup coffee (50% caffeine) a day and several cups tee mostly Earl Grey with lemon every day. For me is Poland a Tee-land.
Cargo pants 3 | 1,070
26 Oct 2021 #2
Tea is for older generation,now I think the younger crowd is more into coffee.I see that in coffee places and even in Zabka with coffee machines.
Lenka 3 | 2,716
26 Oct 2021 #3
Tea.

I don't drink coffee at all. Don't like it
pawian 187 | 17,522
26 Oct 2021 #4
I don`t like hot drinks so I stay away from tea or coffee. Besides, coffee is bitter. I drink it once, twice a month when offered. Tea - never.
OP Alien 7 | 1,076
26 Oct 2021 #5
Coffee can be drunk with milk, then it's not hot or bitter. Tea ( black or green ) is to be enjoyed. Is better than fizzy water or cola.
Cargo pants 3 | 1,070
26 Oct 2021 #6
fizzy water or cola.

I havent had those for ages.I cant have tea just too light for a kick.Coffee with milk is good for me to wake up,now they have all those blends like Vanilla,Hazelnut etc kills the coffee for me.Coffee Tea is served in cafes in Poland is in those ceramic cups,I hate that,always have to ask for paper cup as it gets cold so quick.
johnny reb 32 | 6,916
26 Oct 2021 #7
Coffee with its caffeine gets you wired while tea is much more cleansing and relaxing.

I drink only one cup coffee (50% caffeine) a day

Ha, myself also in my old age as the acid in strong coffee tears my guts up and the caffeine makes me shake.
jon357 70 | 19,658
26 Oct 2021 #8
Tea is for older generation

Except for that 'green tea'. Yuk.

Is Poland tea or coffee land.

It depends. Some people drink cup after cup of very strong 'parzona' coffee, some never.

Some drink espresso like an Italian, others, well......

I remember once offering a client coffee and he replied (think of an upper Silesian accent here) "Ooo nooo, Ai already drenk almoost 170 mililitres of green tea slaightly oover one hour end 15 minutes agoo". I wanted to smack him in the mouth.

Plus there used to be a cafe in pl. Wilsona, the kind with ironic furniture run by upper-middle class kids and paid for by someone's parents. I was waiting for someone there who was late. First I had a white coffee which was as weak as cats' **** so I had an espresso. After about half an hour and still waiting, I ordered another espresso. The wholesome looking young Zoliborzian behind the counter looked at me in horror and absolute disbelief and said (in Polish) "Bbu bu but Sir, if you actually drank that, it would be three coffees"!

the acid in strong coffee

If you go to a shop that sells fancy coffee, they have types that are less acidic than most I prefer that kind..
Cargo pants 3 | 1,070
26 Oct 2021 #10
Except for that 'green tea'. Yuk

lol man you just said it.Tastes like water from a boiled wood,just like that free tea they give you in chinese restaurants.

go to a shop that sells fancy coffee

Last time I had that coffee somewhere in old town in a little cafe where we had that "kopi luwak" (I think thats what it is called)for 88pln a cup.LOL tasted like sh/it to me,still prefer homemade or dunkin donuts coffee.Starbucks and others suck for me.
jon357 70 | 19,658
26 Oct 2021 #11
"kopi luwak"

Too fancy for me and 90% of it is fake anyway, like the 'wasabi' that people think is actually wasabi.

LOL tasted like sh/it to me

Precisely what it is, since after all, it's been through a cat.

prefer homemade or dunkin donuts coffee.Starbucks and others suck for me

KFC coffee in Poland is (or used to be, anyway) really good quality.

I like Blue Mountain (or the nearest thing to it) as an expensive treat.
Cargo pants 3 | 1,070
26 Oct 2021 #12
Too fancy for me and 90% of it is fake anyway

Me too,but my "new money"Polish friends wanted to go there.Too bad Dunkin Donuts left Poland second time.

KFC coffee in Poland

Thats good to know,I have never had KFC coffee in my life.
Atch 17 | 4,014
26 Oct 2021 #13
I'd say from what I've seen that Poland is equally a tea and coffee culture. I think it's the combination of Russian and German influence that accounts for it. If you visit somebody's home it's usual to be offered either tea or coffee. There are a couple of chains of retail shops that specialize in tea like Five O' Clock and Czas na HerbatÄ™. They also sell coffees but tea is their main thing. Fruit teas and herbal teas are very popular but the Indian tea blends available in Poland are either a bit bland and 'weak' for the Irish and British palate or else they're horribly coarse like Liptons which is an abomination. Liptons used to be a fairly average British tea when I was a kid, but the weird version of it they sell here is poisonous stuff. I buy Twinings English Breakfast loose tea which is the only thing I've found with any kind of flavour and a bit of kick in it. I've had one or two Ceylon and Darjeelings that were nice too. Ahmad teas (a British company) are a big thing in the gift market. You'll find them in all the main supermarkets and they do beautifully packaged teas. For example, the Afternoon Tea collection below is on sale in my local supermarket at the moment:

uk.ahmadtea.com/collections/tea-selection-packs/products/afternoon-tea-collection-of-9-black-fruit-green-teas-45-teabags
OP Alien 7 | 1,076
26 Oct 2021 #14
I remember my holidays in England. Black tea ( with milk) was always excellent. I think it was because of water quality in England. Tea in Poland is better than in Germany or Czech. My favorite is also Ahmad tea-individually foiled sachets. It is also possible to buy individually foiled Lipton- it is very rare but excellent.
Atch 17 | 4,014
26 Oct 2021 #15
Black tea ( with milk) was always excellent. I think it was because of water quality

No, it's the blends. That's the secret of good tea. It's all in the blending. The blends of tea used in the UK are blended for the British palate and the 'average' blend tends to be quite robust so the tea is full of flavour and really revives you if you're feeling tired.
OP Alien 7 | 1,076
26 Oct 2021 #16
Well, only that the same tea brought from England did not taste so well when brewed in German water. So it can't be just a blend.
johnny reb 32 | 6,916
26 Oct 2021 #17
that the same tea brought from England did not taste so well

So bad that the Americans dumped it over board rather than pay the tax on it. :-/
jon357 70 | 19,658
26 Oct 2021 #18
the 'average' blend tends to be quite robust

And intended to be served with milk; Yorkshire Tea without it would be brutal.
Atch 17 | 4,014
26 Oct 2021 #19
when brewed in German water.

If the water has chemicals in it that make the tap water itself taste bad then certainly the tea won't taste good either. Which brand of tea was it, do you remember? If you're adding milk, the type of milk makes a difference to the taste too. I drink my tea black in Poland because it just doesn't taste good with milk.

Yorkshire Tea without it would be brutal.

Yes, there are Irish blends that are similar - real builders' tea :)) Jon do you use the phrase 'let the tea draw' in the north of England when you leave the teapot to stand for a few minutes after making the tea?
OP Alien 7 | 1,076
26 Oct 2021 #20
@Atch
P&G tea for example.
jon357 70 | 19,658
26 Oct 2021 #21
P&G

PG Tips? Sweepings from the factory floor.

In Poland, there's a lot of Dilmah which is good quality except you need three bags to get a decent mug of tea.
OP Alien 7 | 1,076
26 Oct 2021 #22
But also PG tips taste good in England with or without milk.
jon357 70 | 19,658
26 Oct 2021 #23
I'd not buy it personally.

Jon do you use the phrase 'let the tea draw' in the north of England

Yes. 'Draw' or 'mash'. It's essential when making actual tea. It needs a few minutes. Unlike in Poland where they wave a tiny bag for a few seconds at a glass of warm water. That's just coloured water rather than tea.

If the water has chemicals in it that make the tap water itself taste bad

I just remembered. It really does make a difference that the water's not been boiled before. I always empty the kettle and put fresh water in. Something to do with oxygenisation.
pawian 187 | 17,522
26 Oct 2021 #24
German influence

Why German? I thought it was Austrian influence coz one of the first cafes in Europe was opened in Vienna by a Polish soldier who used coffee seized after Sobieski`s victory over the Turks.

Coffee can be drunk with milk, then it's not hot or bitter.

What is the sense in drinking coffee which isn`t hot??? hahaha Besides, with milk or without it, it is still bitter. You would have to dilute one cup of coffee with 3 cups of milk to reduce bitterness. Which is again senseless.

Believe me, I tried various approaches and now I know the best is to abstain from it.:):):)
mafketis 34 | 11,650
26 Oct 2021 #25
AFAICT tea and coffee serve different purposes in Poland...

Tea is a social and/or pass the time drink and there's traditions of different herbal teas as remedies for common ailments (I remember a colleague recommended linden tea for some complaint I had.... yech it was awful and didn't help). Poles drink a lot of tea but they're not at the same level as the non-stop tea guzzling Russians or Turks...

Coffee is a more need-the-jolt drink and/or special occasion/visitor drink (from when it was a special thing during communist shortages?). The traditional Polish way (pouring boiling water over coffee grounds in a cup/glass is an acquired taste I never really acquired.....

My favorite coffee is in a moka pot... (not overstuffed and placed in water just when the top gets full... which helps reduce bitterness).
pawian 187 | 17,522
26 Oct 2021 #26
The traditional Polish way (pouring boiling water over coffee grounds

When I am offered coffee, they always ask me if I prefer instant or ground. I always say it doesn`t matter.

BTW, what is another way of making coffee apart from what I mentioned? Coz you seem to be suggesting the third option.....
Strzelec35 36 | 1,507
26 Oct 2021 #27
Poland was never a coffee society until the recent western influence of starbucks and such.
Miloslaw 13 | 4,155
26 Oct 2021 #28
For the older ones,Poland is a tea country, for the younger ones it is coffee.
Personally, I only drink coffee to wake me up in the morning,
For the rest of the day I drink tea or water to.quench my thirst.
Novichok 3 | 6,666
26 Oct 2021 #29
Tea sucks. It stains.
Atch 17 | 4,014
27 Oct 2021 #30
in Poland where they wave a tiny bag for a few seconds at a glass of warm water

Lol! Poland is not alone in that though. So many cultures don't know how to make tea - water should hit tea on the rolling boil, gentlemen!

fresh water

Yes, that's a must.

Why German? I thought it was Austrian influence

Just because to an outsider like myself, Poland seems to reflect in many ways, the influence of its two neighbours. But actually it seems that coffee found its way to Poland directly from Turkey during the 17th or 18th centuries, which makes sense. That would account for why older Polish people still make coffee 'the Turkish way'. It's not exactly Turkish style because they don't 'cook' it, but they make it in the cup and drink it with the coffee grounds still in the bottom. That's how I learned to make it in Poland and that's how I drink it myself. At weekends when I have more time, I make it in a little saucepan over the gas flame, simmering it for a few minutes, and it's really delicious.

Poland was never a coffee society until the recent western influence of starbucks and such.

Not true. Even in the PRL years coffee was widely available and drunk in most households.


Home / Food / Poland-Tea or coffee land?
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.