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The great British baked bean in Poland


InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
29 Sep 2012  #1
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baked_beans (if you've never heard of them)

Got a tin of Tesco's baked beans here, and was looking forward to it. But something's lacking in the sauce. Tested them on their own and on toast.

This means I'll have to try Heinz Fasola which I hope is the same recipe as in England. Of course, many Brits will tell you they prefer Crosse & Blackwell's baked beans to Heinz's. Or Branston's. Personally, Sainsbury's own label is fine for me, and might be repackaged Heinz's anyway.

Yes of course, with a nice range of Polish foods here in Poland, baked beans are not that important at all except for a rare treat (although in England they're considered a pauper's dish).

For anyone browsing and who's in Wroc, there's a shop at Magnolia Park retail mall which has quite a few UK brands and foods from all over. I think it is called World Foods. You can get quite a few things in there.
Cardno85 31 | 976
30 Jul 2013  #2
Got a tin of Tesco's baked beans here, and was looking forward to it. But something's lacking in the sauce. Tested them on their own and on toast.

This is a common problem with supermarket own brands. I am not a huge baked bean fan, but I do love me some Spaghetti Hoops. The key is in the seasoning, it's the same basic sauce, but different companies have slightly different seasoning profiles. What you want to do is heat it up on the hob, then adjust the seasoning to suit, tasting as you go. I generally find that salt and sugar are all I need to get a Heinz like flavour. Experimentation is your friend here.
OP InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
30 Jul 2013  #3
I'll give it a go! Auchan and some other supermarkets have a brand or two stocked now (at Auchan they're in glass jars btw).
Cardno85 31 | 976
30 Jul 2013  #4
I'll give it a go

You definitely should, I discovered it back in the UK when I got hoops on special in the co-op and they were nothing like Heinz, cost almost nothing though so I was happy to play about with spices and seasoning until I got it good. You never know, you might get a blend that is even BETTER than Heinz!
OP InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
30 Jul 2013  #5
you might get a blend that is even BETTER than Heinz!

Steady on! :D
Harry
30 Jul 2013  #6
This means I'll have to try Heinz Fasola which I hope is the same recipe as in England.

I'm not sure, I'd suspect that they are not (I remember that the ones in Switzerland were not the same as in England). I always add lots of sauces to baked beans anyway: try adding some Worcestershire sauce and Tabasco, and perhaps a bit of habanero sauce and some jalapeno sauce, and a hint of wasabi.
OP InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
30 Jul 2013  #7
Will do, thanks Harry
GreatGooner 2 | 3
3 Feb 2014  #8
Merged: Where can I buy Baked Beans in Poland??

Just the normal British type or a polish variant if need be.... ???

Cheers
Harry
3 Feb 2014  #9
I buy Heinz at my local Carrefour. Where are you in Poland?
local_fela 17 | 172
4 Feb 2014  #12
get a Heinz like flavour

you will get it in Auchan, Alma and Tesco. I bought it few weeks ago. Heinz baked beans. Same label, same colour of the tin and same taste! I think it was around 6-7zl for 400g- But I am not sure.
OP InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
4 Feb 2014  #13
They're about 5zl a tin if you know where to look ;o)
strongmong
5 Feb 2014  #14
4,23pln in carrefour near me they were more but i buy 10tins a week as do 2 other english guys nearly had a barney when they ran out
PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
5 Feb 2014  #15
I never realized baked beans were British.
DominicB - | 2,660
5 Feb 2014  #16
British English "baked beans" = American English "Pork-n-beans". Yes, that's right. These guys are nostalgic for fricking measly Pork-n-beans from the can, not anything resembling Boston baked beans or any of the homemade American versions with tomatoes or barbecue sauce, or the Mexican version. Kind of odd, because they got it from America in the first place (it was sent over to serve as wartime rations for British soldiers and civilians). The Heinz they are talking about is, of course, the same company from Pittsburgh that produces ketchup.

But then, Filipinos consider Spam a delicacy, for the same reason. I think Hormel sells more Spam in the Philippines than in the US, just like Heinz sells more "baked beans" in the UK than in the US.

For our Brit friends, Pork-n-beans (and Spam) are considered poverty food in the States, and bring back unpleasant memories of the Great Depression, or of a deprived childhood in some God-awful white trash trailer park next to a NASCAR track somewhere down there in the Bible Belt. Not too many people feel nostalgic about them.

Our versions of baked beans, on the other hand, are generally homemade and much better than the canned version, and are considered an art form, particularly in the Northeastern and Southwestern parts of the county. Even in the Mid West and South, you'll be hard pressed to find a barbecue or church dinner to which someone doesn't bring homemade baked beans. People do get the warm fuzzies over these versions.

I've been living in Poland for twelve years now, and Mexican baked beans are a regular part of my diet. I make a huge pot almost every week. (Reminds me of my grad student days in San Diego). I make a pot of Boston baked beans about once a year, because molasses is a bear to find in this country. That's the version I grew up with.
smurf 39 | 1,982
5 Feb 2014  #17
Baked Beans, from the UK, contain no sausage/pork.
DominicB - | 2,660
5 Feb 2014  #18
It's not an essential ingredient in "Pork-n-Beans", either, despite the name. There are also vegetarian versions in the States, too, and most Americans would refer to these as "Pork-n-Beans", too, even though they don't contain any pork at all. When sold in the States, the can usually contains a measly five-gram piece of hideous pork fat, whereas in the UK, it does not. Otherwise, they are identical.
Harry
5 Feb 2014  #19
Pray, where is that?

Not in Marks and Spencer, that's for sure!
smurf 39 | 1,982
5 Feb 2014  #20
Otherwise, they are identical.

Well yes, they are of course identical, even though they are different ;)
Harry
5 Feb 2014  #21
as children we never even knew that baked beans existed - now to see brits slavering over them as though they were some kind of national manna cracks me up

Now that I think about it, we never had baked beans at our house either; so why are baked beans in Poland comfort food? Now that I think further about it, the time I ate most baked beans was when I was a student and couldn't afford anything other than Asda baked beans, that was not a particularly comfortable time in my life. But with that said, baked beans (with some Lea & Perrins, Blair's Pure Death and a pinch of Sharwood's madras powder) on toast (buttered and topped with Marmite and perhaps a touch of Cheddar) is a cracking meal of one, about once or twice a month anyway.

Well yes, they are of course identical, even though they are different ;)

Baked beans: the kosher pork 'n beans.
Cardno85 31 | 976
5 Feb 2014  #22
the time I ate most baked beans was when I was a student and couldn't afford anything other than Asda baked beans

And that's why it's comfort food, cheap and cheerful and brings back memories of younger days. Maybe people ate baked beans because they had no money, but looking back you see the good memories of those times when you eat them.

I know that for me the best comfort food is Marshall's Macaroni Cheese in a box (Made with Real Cheddar...powder no less!) and packs of Batchelor's Pasta and Sauce. That's what I lived on when I was working 80 odd hours in hospitality. Yes, it was a fine dining restaurant and I would have some of the finest food ever at work from time to time, but I go home after 16 hours on my feet and all I want is something that will be ready in 5 minutes. I still love the stuff, as awful as it is for you.


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