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British food products in Poland?


jon357 63 | 14,255
9 Aug 2019 #121
It was first time I couldn't eat piece of pizza and when they weren't looking, I tossed it out:(

For me, that was at Da Grasso, a newish chain in PL. I don't mind Telepizza, though some people hate them. There is good pizza to be found in PL, though few and far between.

@Joker
If you ever see Botton Village cheese over there (made at a community of people with Downs Syndrome in North Yorkshire) it's really worth trying. They've been making it for decades. It's expensive but excellent, and I think is exported overseas.
jon357 63 | 14,255
9 Aug 2019 #122
A lot of people have been raving over a new chain of shops (there's one in the new mall by Rondo Wiatraczna) that sells a lot of British food, mostly in jars and packets. I don't remember the name, however apparently they belong to either Poundland or Poundworld (whichever one didn't go bust recently).
Miloslaw 6 | 2,568
9 Aug 2019 #123
Poundworld went bust, so it's Poundland.
jon357 63 | 14,255
9 Aug 2019 #124
Thanks. I just remembered the name of the shop, Dealz. And Google says there's a new one near my home!
Dougpol1 33 | 3,259
9 Aug 2019 #125
Dealz

What a load of old crap. Nothing to get at all excited about there jon. There's one in Gdansk, but there's nowt of any interest. They will go bust sharpish I would have thought.
mafketis 21 | 7,472
9 Aug 2019 #126
but there's nowt of any interest

British food appeals to Poles about as much as a cheeseburger does to an orthodox Jew.... it's not even anything they recognize as food.... (same goes for American food, I tell people you can actually eat very well in America if you know how to avoid the processed junk.... but hardly any ever believe me)
jon357 63 | 14,255
9 Aug 2019 #127
What a load of old crap

Really? Someone I know was raving about the one in Gocław. She mentioned marmite (yuk) and mint sauce. A photo I saw of the shelves had mostly crisps and sweets, and there were various online comments from newish expats/migrants raving over it. Worth a look when I'm back next week, but if it's as crap as you say I may not buy anything. The food section at Poundland was only ever good for cheap sweets anyway.
Dougpol1 33 | 3,259
10 Aug 2019 #128
They do stock the original Bonios, with the lab loves, but there is nothing else. The sweets are German on the whole - not British. The liquorice allsorts are not Bassetts. Kaufland do Kellogs corn flakes btw.....

Having said that....Colman's mustard.....:)
jon357 63 | 14,255
10 Aug 2019 #129
They do stock the original Bonios

Mine liked Bonio, Really easy to make at home, basic biscuit dough (try using smalec) and (low-salt) beef stock. A bit of aniseed makes the doggies like them even more ;-)

I bring the powder from the U.K., though Kuchnie Świata sometimes have it. Once I bought some (not Colman's) ready-made to bring to PL and noticed on the label that it was made there. Just a shame we don't sell it in Poland instead of that insipid Sarepska etc.
Crow 137 | 7,756
10 Aug 2019 #130
Yes.The Zakopane cheeses are the only good ones in Poland.

Ah finally something good about Poland, out of you.

Love to Britain leads to eating British food in friendly talk and company with radical Muslims and mujaheedines.
Wincig 2 | 185
11 Aug 2019 #131
British food appeals to Poles about as much as a cheeseburger does to an orthodox Jew..

Indeed. Most non Brits are in a similar position, since those shops appeal mainly to Brits living abroad who crave their Mumy's food from their youth in the UK. Noone in their right mind would want British food (save for a few exceptions like cheese...) if they don't have the excuse of youth addiction!
Dougpol1 33 | 3,259
11 Aug 2019 #132
Noone in their right mind would want British food

(Fresh) fish and chips and mushy peas.
Roast beef and Yorkshire pudding
Steak and kidney pie
Aberdeen Angus steak
Scottish salmon
The list goes on and on and on......

Meanwhile, enjoy your pork saddle "roasted" in a bag:)
Atch 17 | 2,928
11 Aug 2019 #133
Someone I know was raving about the one in Gocław.

I haven't been there yet but somebody I know has. They got Walker's crisps, Colman's mustard (but the stuff already made up, not the dried mustard which is what I use), Marmite (gross) and Cadbury's chocolate (yum!). They had Cadbury's buttons apparently, but no Twirl - sigh. I loves me Twirls :))

The list goes on and on and on......

Don't forget lamb, proper centre loin lamb cops on the bone, even gigot chops are delicious, pot roasted for an hour or so. You could cut them with a spoon, they're so tender cooked that way. And then gravy made from the juices...........
Dougpol1 33 | 3,259
11 Aug 2019 #134
Cadbury's chocolate

Yeah.....sorry Atch - but "Cadbury's" '"chocolate'" sold here is produced in Poland, by the same multi-conglomerate, but to a different recipe from Cadbury's in Britain - and is total vegetable fat gash.

Avoid at all costs.

proper centre loin lamb

Stop it - you're killing me. No proper din-dins today as Mrs Dougpol is not present, so couldn't work up the energy to cook for one, and only the dog ate well.
Dirk diggler 9 | 4,480
11 Aug 2019 #135
it's not even anything they recognize as food.... (same goes for American food,

Eh not entirely. There's a lot of American restaurants that are quite popular selling burgers, pizza, etc. Well technically those aren't American foods but you know what I mean - Americanized versions of otherbcountries food

you can actually eat very well in America if you know how to avoid the processed junk.... but hardly any ever believe me)

It's very difficult, very time consuming and very expensive than just choosing common processes gmo crap.
Atch 17 | 2,928
11 Aug 2019 #136
different recipe from Cadbury's in Britain

Sometimes you get the real stuff, the one made at the Cadbury factory in Ireland. It uses Irish milk. I bought a few giant bars of it in Biedronka about two years ago. They stocked it on and off for a while.
Dougpol1 33 | 3,259
11 Aug 2019 #137
a few giant bars of it in Biedronka about two years ago. They stocked it on and off for a while.

Yes. That's what irritates me about Polish shops - the fictitious supply chain. Here today, not available tomorrow.
mafketis 21 | 7,472
11 Aug 2019 #138
Polish shops - the fictitious supply chain

It's a lot better than it used to be.... and the problems can be traced back to the PRL and its horrifically dysfunctional and corrupt supply chains.

In the 1990s most stores worked on a variant of the old 'job lot' system - if they needed tea or coffee they got whatever they could find at the hurtownia and when that ran low they got more, not paying attention to anything like brands.

It's only since some time after 2000 and the rise of chains that keep track of what brands sell and what doesn't that any continuity has been able to be established.

And since the public is used to different and changing brands they mostly don't think of brands except for a few areas....
Dougpol1 33 | 3,259
11 Aug 2019 #139
they got whatever they could find at the hurtownia and when that ran low they got more, not paying attention to anything like brands.

Nothing has changed much there. Kaufland especially are weird for this. They got in a batch of British beer (4 boxes), sold it, then said there was nothing more in the warehouses.

So why bother in the first place? They don't know or care about the concept of selling lines, but only alienate the shopper. My opinion anyway.
mafketis 21 | 7,472
11 Aug 2019 #140
They don't know or care about the concept of selling lines

well brand loyalty is pretty spotty in Poland* and people seem to like finding new things in stores (another reason for things like French days at Lidl etc) The British beer would be a novelty for customers who would not expect it to be continually available. I'm happy that biedronka now has an approximation of fresh guacamole but don't expect it to be a permanent addition to the shelves...

Ketchup and mayonaise seem to be among the few things with strong brand followings, I have one friend who makes a point to shop in stores that carry kielecki mayonnaise and I've heard people argue about different brands of ketchup
Dougpol1 33 | 3,259
11 Aug 2019 #141
Ketchup and mayonaise seem to be among the few things with strong brand followings

Yes, understandable - for the sandwiches at supper. The MIL used to make enough to feed the Russian army!
Atch 17 | 2,928
16 Aug 2019 #142
Well, I went to Dealz in Gocław today and I noted the following products:

Kellogs Cornflakes both regular and crunchy nut @ 12zł per box for the 750g size.
Cadbury's Twirl (made in Ireland) 6zł for a five pack, but only five single sticks not five bars.
Cadbury's Fingers (biccies) made in the UK, 5zł per pack.
Terry's Chocolate Orange (milk variety only) 6zł each.
Fox's biccies, various, I bought ginger nuts, 4zł
Burtons biccies, various, didn't buy any of those.
Tea, Tetleys, PG Tips and Typhoo teabags, I'm a loose tea person so didn't buy so didn't notice price.
McVities chocolate digestives, milk choc only as far as I could see.

The thing I was happiest about were the cornflakes, the Twirls and the Cadbury's fingers :-)) I really cannot express the joy of finding Cadbury's fingers!
jon357 63 | 14,255
16 Aug 2019 #143
I noted the following products:

Similar to the range I saw on Wednesday in the one at Galeria Młociny. They did have Mini-cheddars and Twiglets which made happiness complete...

And yes, Cadbury's Fingers are a joy...
Guest
16 Aug 2019 #144
The thing I was happiest about were the cornflakes

Curious about why you would classify cornflakes as a British food product. They are anything but.

Or why anyone would be excited about a food that was intentionally designed with the expressed purpose of killing excitement in teenage boys so they would have no stimulus to masturbate.

Cornflakes have a very interesting history, intimately connected with the brutal mutilation of hundreds of millions of American babies in the last century and a half:

Look up John Harvey Kellogg on Wikipedia.
jon357 63 | 14,255
16 Aug 2019 #145
Don't forget lamb, proper centre loin lamb cops on the bone

I dream of Barnsley Chops, nothing that exists in PL comes anywhere near them.
Atch 17 | 2,928
16 Aug 2019 #146
Curious about why you would classify cornflakes as a British food product.

I don't. But they're very popular in the British Isles. They're much better than the Polish version, lovely in the winter with hot milk! And considering I loathe milk.....

Also, forget to mention they had Crunchies, Double-Deckers, Bakewell tarts (made by someone called The Tasty Bake Company, didn't look that appetising though). Finally, they had mini teacakes, you know those dome shaped delights with marshmallow covered in choc, but I didn't recognize the brand. For me, it has to be Tunnocks Tea Cakes, so I wasn't tempted. I'll wait and order the box of 36 from the UK at Christmas :))

which made happiness complete...

Life is good :))
jon357 63 | 14,255
16 Aug 2019 #147
If I'd seen the Double-Deckers and Crunchies I'd probably have bought the lot. Since there weren't any at Młociny, maybe someone did just that.

Tunnocks

Kuchnia Świata at Arcadia has Tunnock's, both milk and plain ;-)
pawian 161 | 9,971
16 Aug 2019 #148
This guy bought the cheapest 10 British foods and puked 3 times. Crazy.

youtu.be/wxrxwSCB31U
Miloslaw 6 | 2,568
16 Aug 2019 #149
This guy is a moron.
Only morons even try to eat this junk.
But this junk stops poor people from starving.
pawian 161 | 9,971
16 Aug 2019 #150
I suspected it was junk food. Especially those sausages. Yuk.


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