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BREAD IN POLAND IS DETERIORATING


Polonius3 983 | 12333
28 Jun 2009 #1
One thing that has really gone down the drain since the commie era is Poland's bread. Naturally, many visitors from America, the kand of cotton-fluff stuff (Wonder bread, etc.) think Polish bread is really good by comaparison, but not when compared to what it was several decades ago. Primary faults (all motivated by greed) include:

-- smaller amounts of now pricier rye flour and more cheaper wheat flour;
-- darkenss in bread achieved less by wholegrain flour nad more by colour additives such as caramel, fake honey (miód sztuczny) or brown food colouring.

-- use of polepszacze (bread improvers), packets of chemcials ensurign high yields at the expesne of flavour and nutrition;
-- the demise of family-owned bakeries using generations-old recipes and natural ingredients;
-- industrial production by huge, largely German-ownd bread factories which stress output and profits;
-- passing fads such as sprinkling bread nad rolls with a huge amount of pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, etc. in roder to jack up the price.

Anyone agree or disagree?
Seanus 15 | 19669
28 Jun 2009 #2
For starters, Pol3, you don't even live in Poland so how do you know? You make it sound like a fact.

Let me comment on what I can.

To my knowledge, most bread doesn't have any enhancers or preservatives. You can tell as it goes stale very quickly. I always buy a half loaf as a result. Flavour and nutrition is very evident in some loaves here, especially the cut-your-own types.

There are still family bakeries with years of tradition.

I don't think the Germans have much of a say here.

Passing fads? This is a mainstay. It's called variety, Pol3. I was told by my student, and I agree with him, that bread must remain accessible to the masses. You cannot hike up the prices beyond reasonableness. Many families here budget so it's important.

Bread is not a high-profit industry like many others. It just doesn't generate the same turnover levels or revenue.
OP Polonius3 983 | 12333
28 Jun 2009 #3
I've lost count of how many times I've eaten bread in Poland ovde the past decades, and food has laways been at the centre of my interest also for professional reasons. Besides, much of it is now imported to the US in places like Polish Market in Troy or Bożek's in Sterling Hts. My palate well remembers commie era bread prodcued by small GS (cooperative) bakeries in the countryside or small family-owned ones in cities. Even the big state-run urban bread combines turned out soem fairly decent products. Last time I checked I was told that the standard Polish bread, Balatoński or Balatonowski (somethign like that) has around 30-35% rye flour which has been gradually decreased over the years to fool the public.

Haven't you heard of Schulsted (spelling?) bread which seems to be everywhere in Poland. And even if the German angle is not apparent in the logo, some 70% of Poland's food industry is in now in foreign hadns: Krakus Ham (Smithfield), Wedel chocolates (Cabdury), Winiary (Nestle), Okocim beer (Carsberg), Wyborowa (Pernod), etc., etc., etc. ad nauseam!

And those greedmasters are going to use every trick in the book to trim costs and increase profits!!!
Seanus 15 | 19669
28 Jun 2009 #4
Schulstad, yeah, I eat that stuff as well as US Tost. It lasts longer than most Polish bread which gets dry and yucky quickly.

Business is business, Pol3, hard to get around that.

Some bakers don't even protect their bread. I remember coming back from the gym to buy a loaf in a specialist baker called Topowska. As soon as I saw the various wasps clinging to it, I decided against it. Bread is designed to be fresh, not with wasps and flies buzzing around and dropping on it.
Wroclaw 44 | 5359
28 Jun 2009 #5
One thing that has really gone down the drain since the commie era is Poland's bread.

In the 'commie era' the choice was take it or leave it.

Now we have a choice.

As Seanus mentions there are still plenty of small, private bakeries who bake traditional, local loaves.

As some bread is in fact local to certain areas it would be ridiculous to generalize it.
Seanus 15 | 19669
28 Jun 2009 #6
Exactly, Wrocław. In the commie era, it was something like rationing where you only received the staples that they gave you. Now you have a wider selection to cover numerous tastes.

I'm glad that I can buy Schulstad and US Tost. If I buy it on Wednesday, the day of delivery, I am assured that I will have sth like 9 days in which to eat it. The other Polish stuff is fine for families but not for individuals who don't eat bread that often.
aphrodisiac 11 | 2436
28 Jun 2009 #7
And those greedmasters are going to use every trick in the book to trim costs and increase profits!!!

good point but somebody has sold those companies to them, so they were greedy as well.

When it comes to quality of bread in Poland in varies and if the German bread is cheaper, Poles will buy is, since it is NOT a well off society yet.
Seanus 15 | 19669
28 Jun 2009 #8
Still, old Poles can be very demanding and are accustomed to commie ways. The idea that 'oh, I'm paying for something' is still foremost in the minds of many. They seem to think that the mere tendering of gold (złoty) guarantees them things of the highest quality. When you come to expect sth, and the quality dwindles, they will voice their dissent.

The Polish voice is never too far away when it comes to outlining where sth is wrong :)
dtaylor5632 18 | 1998
28 Jun 2009 #9
I just hate the fact when i buy a loaf i have to eat it within the next couple of days. Can't believe i'm saying this, but put some preservatives into your products ;)
Cardno85 31 | 971
28 Jun 2009 #10
use of polepszacze (bread improvers), packets of chemcials ensurign high yields at the expesne of flavour and nutrition;

You will find this mostly with supermarket bread. People just often don't have time to do all their shopping in independant bakers, grocers and fishmongers. Plus they don't have time to go shopping every day for a loaf of bread they are likely to have to throw out. It's not a good state of affairs but that's just how it is. People are more likely to go shopping once/twice a week and so need bread that will last, even at the expense of flavour/nutrition.
Seanus 15 | 19669
28 Jun 2009 #11
See, the Scots see it well. We prefer practicality over, 'oh, our bread is the best in the world' crap. Besides, Warburton and Hovis are healthy enough. More damage comes from pesticides and insects getting at fruit and veg than a few preservatives.

We also have specialist bakers, funnily enough.
dtaylor5632 18 | 1998
28 Jun 2009 #12
Aye, my local baker made some of the best rolls and chicken pasties i've ever had. I'd rather spend a wee bit more on something that will last, than have to go to the shop every day to buy a half loaf. One more thing, where are the decent bread rolls?
Cardno85 31 | 971
28 Jun 2009 #13
where are the decent bread rolls?

Glasgow, you don't even get them in Argyll. Glasgow is the only place for decent morning rolls.
Seanus 15 | 19669
28 Jun 2009 #14
You pay for quality, that's true. Poland has good bread rolls. Well, in Silesia anyway. They are flaky and filling. I fancy a buttery now (rowie).

Och, laddie, butteries (morning rolls) are legendary up north. Standard rolls (baps, lol) are great for cheese&ham sarnies.
dtaylor5632 18 | 1998
28 Jun 2009 #15
Geeez a tattie scone roll wae broon sauce anyday. The lunch that got me through the school day....and chips and curry sauce fae the chinkies.
Cardno85 31 | 971
28 Jun 2009 #16
butteries

Big difference between butteries and morning rolls. But butteries are brilliant as well!
Seanus 15 | 19669
28 Jun 2009 #17
Morning rolls, I think I know what you mean. Soft and good for ham with mayo?

Tattie scones are legendary. Polish bread rolls are great but they go hard quite quickly. I have to buy them in the morning as they are only good for throwing in the oven when I buy them in the evening.
Cardno85 31 | 971
28 Jun 2009 #18
Morning rolls, I think I know what you mean. Soft and good for ham with mayo?

The ones that are proper crispy round the outside but soft on the inside.

Tattie scones are legendary

I might make some for the Paintball tournament.
dtaylor5632 18 | 1998
28 Jun 2009 #19
I might make some for the Paintball tournament.

Yup we can do that, plus some tandori chicken on skewers and sticky chinese spare ribs im bringing.

please don't wander off topic .
Seanus 15 | 19669
28 Jun 2009 #20
Aha, gotcha! Even butteries come in 2 types. The crispy ones are legendary with some butter and the puffy ones with cheese spread :)

They pile on the pounds quickly tho.
OP Polonius3 983 | 12333
28 Jun 2009 #21
Wasps or bees attracted to bread suggests browned miód sztuczny was used to give the bread a darker hue.
Seanus 15 | 19669
28 Jun 2009 #22
That's quite likely, Pol3. The bread certainly appeared to be darker.
dtaylor5632 18 | 1998
28 Jun 2009 #23
On topic with bread, does anywhere in Poland sell crumpets?
This talk has made me hungry, so i have given cardno some cash to buy me some grub :D
Seanus 15 | 19669
28 Jun 2009 #24
I've never seen them, even in Tesco.
Wroclaw 44 | 5359
28 Jun 2009 #25
Wasps or bees attracted to bread suggests browned miód sztuczny was used to give the bread a darker hue.

Honey was used in the old days by the elite... then came refined sugar... now we can all afford honey. Only certain breads have honey added.

my source: an unpublished work.
Seanus 15 | 19669
28 Jun 2009 #26
Great source :) I like those ones too :) Having honey added is often a good thing as it gives the bread a better texture. Polish bread is just too dry.
Matyjasz 2 | 1543
28 Jun 2009 #27
I remember as a kid I use to go down to my local bakery and buy a few loafs of bred in the evening, then we would eat it with the whole family and watch "Koło Fortuny". I don't remember how long it stayed fresh because usually it was gone very quickly.

I agree with you Polonius, it's hard to find a good quality bread these days. The best in my area is still being made by GS's.

The same is happening with meat products. Krakowska, Podwawelska, cygańska, śląska they all taste the same to me these days. Luckily I have my local butcher who makes proper hams and sausages. Well, not that good as I remember them to be 20 years ago, but quite close to it.
plk123 8 | 4134
28 Jun 2009 #28
You can tell as it goes stale very quickly. I always buy a half loaf as a result.

keep in a paper bag wrapped in a plastic one in the fridge.. i easily get 2 weeks out of a loaf. i also freeze extra loaves in my deep freezer and they are great when defrosted.. try that with wonder bread. :D :D :D

In the commie era, it was something like rationing where you only received the staples that they gave you.

lol.. that's pretty funny in different ways...

The Polish voice is never too far away when it comes to outlining where sth is wrong :)

ain't that the truth. ;) :D

Polish bread is just too dry.

nah, it's perfect
Seanus 15 | 19669
28 Jun 2009 #29
I'll maybe try that. Thanks for the advice, plk123.
plk123 8 | 4134
28 Jun 2009 #30
i added a thing or two above but you're welcome. it works for me.


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