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Polish placki v latkes (potato pancakes)


Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
6 Nov 2010 #1
Like many people I love potato pancakes. But only redcentyl was I introduced to the Jewish version, latkes. They differ in that the potatoes are grated a bit more coarsely (on the coarse side of a hand-held grater).They are less mushy and come out a bit like a cross between Polish placki kartoflane and American hash browns. Try 'em and see if you don't agree.

BTW how do you like your placki: just salted, salt & sour cream (my choice), sugar, sugar & soyr cream, other (apple sauce)? Or the Hungarian way as a base for goulash?
Zed - | 195
6 Nov 2010 #2
with plenty of chanterelles and yummy creamy sauce
Lyzko
6 Nov 2010 #3
I once had a Polish potato dish called 'pyzy', I believe. The tasted like real potato pancakes and were just delicious!-)))
Cardno85 31 | 976
6 Nov 2010 #4
I'm on the mushroom sauce boat.
Softsong 5 | 495
6 Nov 2010 #5
My mother always made potato pancakes very thin, and we sprinkled a light dusting of sugar and had them with apple sauce on the side, or sour cream. I would also love them with mushroom sauce.

When I lived in NYC, I sometimes ate a Jewish potato dish that was called Knish. It was very different than a potato pancake.
Marynka11 4 | 677
6 Nov 2010 #6
I'm from Poland, and my (non- Jewish) mother was always making them just like the Jewish version you described. My family would put sour cream, or sugar on them.

My husband who is from Germany likes to eat them with apple sauce, and he says that's how they are eaten where he comes from.

I like them just plan. BTW, it's a good lunch idea for today. Thank for reminding me about them.
strzyga 2 | 993
6 Nov 2010 #7
I once had a Polish potato dish called 'pyzy', I believe. The tasted like real potato pancakes and were just delicious!-)))

Pyzy are round and boiled, not fried.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
6 Nov 2010 #8
But some people refry pre-boiled pyzy and kopytka, so maybe that's why he had the impression it was something fried. I also prefer refried thigns including pierogi.
Lyzko
6 Nov 2010 #9
Thanks for enlightening me.

))))
Ksysia 25 | 430
6 Nov 2010 #10
Do you think Knish has anything to do with Poznanian 'knysze'?
Lyzko
6 Nov 2010 #11
Could be, Ksysia. It might also be a take off on the French 'Knishe Lorraine', the well-known cheese and spinach pastry pie dish. Then again, I forget if it's 'quiche' or 'knishe' Lorraine.
ShawnH 8 | 1,507
6 Nov 2010 #12
'knishe'

Only knishe if the speaker has a speech impediment.
:-)

I am good with either sour cream or ketchup on my placki.
aphrodisiac 11 | 2,441
6 Nov 2010 #13
Only knishe if the speaker has a speech impediment.
:-)

still love the Canadian humour ;)
ShawnH 8 | 1,507
6 Nov 2010 #14
Glad to be of service ;-)
Bzibzioh
6 Nov 2010 #15
Or the Hungarian way as a base for goulash?

That would be my choice. I make them often like this. Jewish latkes have too much onion and if they come from the store, they taste like mud.
Softsong 5 | 495
6 Nov 2010 #16
Now you have me wondering what about the origin of the word Knish. They are sold all around NYC. First information I found is that it is a Yiddish word taken from the Ukrainian word, knysh.

From the pictures online of Poznanian knysze, I'd say they look very similar. The knish I know is mainly potato, but it can be stuffed with anything, really.

Culinary definition: whatscookingamerica.net/Glossary/K.htm

knish - The knish is a pastry of Jewish origin consisting of a piece of dough that encloses a filling of seasoned mashed potatoes. Basically they are a mashed potato pie. When sold by the street corner vendors in New York City, they are fried and square shaped. The baked ones are usually round shaped, and are usually made at home and some knish bakeries.

History: Eastern European Jews developed the knish. During the early 1900s, when hundreds of thousands of Eastern European Jews Emigrated to America and settled in New York City, they brought with them their family recipes for knishes. Knishes were made at home until Yonah Schimmel, a rabbi from Romania, began to sell them at Coney Island in New York City, and also from a pushcart on the Lower East Side. In 1910, he opened his original knish bakery located on East Houston Street.

So there you have, the rest of the story. :-)
Lyzko
6 Nov 2010 #17
They come from Middle High German, both words 'quiche' and 'knish'.
Softsong 5 | 495
6 Nov 2010 #18
Wow....then this particular type of cuisine sure spread all over Europe. Interesting. I think the quiche form though developed in a way that emphasized cheese and egg as the base whereas the knish emphasizes the potato base along with possibly cheese, spinach, etc.

Meanwhile, back to potato pancakes.....
joepilsudski 26 | 1,389
6 Nov 2010 #19
BTW how do you like your placki: just salted, salt & sour cream (my choice), sugar, sugar & sour cream, other (apple sauce)? Or the Hungarian way as a base for goulash?

With ketchup, some pepper and hot sauce...They also good with Jamaican 'Pic-a-peppa' sauce, or an HP/Heinz 57 type sauce...I can eat them just with a vegetable, like green beans or broccoli, maybe a salad, and they make a meal.
kleytoncooper - | 1
7 Aug 2014 #20
My mother's German potato pancakes start out with a medium shredding, then drain the water, leaving the starch in the bowl. Remix shredded potato with starch and add only minced onion and 1 egg. Salt, pepper - - proceed as usual! Always turned out crispy, golden!
Szalawa 2 | 243
8 Aug 2014 #21
BTW how do you like your placki

Hungarian style, with goulash and cheese and some sour cream on the side
Krasbro - | 4
8 Aug 2014 #22
I love them as a savoury dish with goulash or for desert with vanilla sugar sprinkled on top.


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