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How is this herring product typically served?


Starfish65
25 Apr 2021 #1
Lisner Wiejskie Herring Fillets with Onion 450g
pawian 187 | 17,898
26 Apr 2021 #2
You can use them in herring salad. There are a lot of recipes available. The size of chunks is changeable - big or small.

I like herring fillets on condition they are not too salty.



gumishu 11 | 5,993
26 Apr 2021 #3
Lisner Wiejskie

cold with bread/boiled potatoes
pawian 187 | 17,898
26 Apr 2021 #4
cold with bread/

When I don`t have time to make a salad, I just make a sandwich.





pawian 187 | 17,898
26 Apr 2021 #5
boiled potatoes

Wow, it never occured to me. Funny.

I like those herring fillets for three reasons:
- they are sour (vinegar)
- they are greasy
- fish bones are soft
Atch 17 | 4,087
29 Apr 2021 #6
Wow, it never occured to me.

My husband eats matjas with bread but śledź w wodzie with potatoes.

they are greasy

Oily would be a better choice of adjective. Herring comes under the heading of 'oily fish' in English, whereas greasy is associated with animal fat. Grease is solid fat. Describing a food as greasy indicates that it's unpleasantly fatty with excess grease.
gumishu 11 | 5,993
29 Apr 2021 #7
My husband eats matjas

do you personally eat herring as well?
Atch 17 | 4,087
29 Apr 2021 #8
No :) I find them too salty even after soaking for 24 hours but I enjoy preparing them and knowing that other people will enjoy them :) I like smoked fish so when Mr Atch has his fishy treats I have a nice bit of makrela wędzona or similar. He likes szprot wędzony but I really don't like the feeling of crunching through all those bones and their little heads still being attached - yikes! I like whole fish if it's larger, trout, for example. I don't seem to mind the sight of the head then.
gumishu 11 | 5,993
29 Apr 2021 #9
He likes szprot wędzony

eating whole fish like this freaks me out similarly - however I don't mind sprats from a tin (without heads)
Atch 17 | 4,087
29 Apr 2021 #10
I also like paprykasz. It's very easy to make and much nicer if you make it yourself at home. It's very economical too because you can make one quite small mackerel last for a few days! It's yummy eaten warm - you can spread it on bread, pop a fried egg on top and there's your dinner :)
gumishu 11 | 5,993
29 Apr 2021 #11
paprykasz. It's very easy to make

wow, you must be a deft cook then :) - my mum used to make a dish of mackerel (she calls it 'pasta z makreli') - you crush mackerel, add butter, chives and parsley leaves - you can also add diced sour cucumbers (I'm not sure if ogórki kiszone are the same thing as 'dill pickles') - you can find a recipe by just googling 'pasta z makreli' - of course it is smoked mackerel that is used (I took a glance at a couple of recipes and they use mayo or yoghurt instead of butter - a new 'healthy' fad I guess)
Lenka 3 | 2,764
29 Apr 2021 #12
(I took a glance at a couple of recipes and they use mayo or yoghurt instead of butter - a new 'healthy' fad I guess)

Different recipes probably. People always look to improve a bit don't they?
In my family we also add onion and eggs...
gumishu 11 | 5,993
29 Apr 2021 #13
I think mom used to add onion, not sure about eggs - it's been years...

by the way the Polish word pasta means paste and has nothing to do with the English word pasta
Lenka 3 | 2,764
29 Apr 2021 #14
I'm actually writing to my sis to ask for the recipie I wanted to do it for ages now but never got around to asking (she was the one who was always making it at home). It is a bit of a pain though-to make sure no bones are left :/
gumishu 11 | 5,993
29 Apr 2021 #15
recipie

I'm not sure but I guess after preparing the paste you should leave it for a time for the tastes of the ingredients to blend
Atch 17 | 4,087
29 Apr 2021 #16
crush mackerel, add butter, chives and parsley leaves

That sounds like a nice one for summer. I think I'd add fresh cucumber instead of the kiszone. I know it would give it a different taste but I think it would be nice and 'summery' ;)

you must be a deft cook then

I must confess I'm quite a good cook! And I've learned to make a lot of Polish dishes. Most Polish recipes are pretty straightforward but they tend to be very labour intensive. They're typical, good 'rustic' dishes that use only a few ingredients but really make the most of those few things. I also make Russian dishes. They're interesting because they're similar to Polish but with a bit of a twist. You know the way the base of many Polish soups is the włoszczyzna (leek, celeriac, parsnip, carrot) but with Russian soups it's celery stalks, grated carrot, onion, garlic. Another thing about Polish recipes is the omnipresent ziele angielskie ;) I like it but it's quite a distinctive taste and can end up making dishes taste very similar to each other. The Rooskies don't seem to use it but they go heavy on the sour cream and they quite like adding tomato puree too.

I'm going to try a new fish recipe this weekend. It's an old English thing called kedgeree, from their Indian empire days. I think it would appeal to the Polish palate. It uses smoked haddock but that's hard to get in Poland so any smoked fish would do.

bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/really_good_kedgeree_75198
gumishu 11 | 5,993
29 Apr 2021 #17
włoszczyzna

onion,

my mom adds onion to most of the soups she makes - probably except for the cauliflower soup

as for herrings - there is a nice herring based salad originally from Ukraine that is called 'szuba' (or 'szuba ukraińska') - it makes use of beetroot - my mom did it a couple of times and I liked it - google for a recipe if you are interested
pawian 187 | 17,898
29 Apr 2021 #18
Grease is solid fat.

greasy - covered with or full of fat or oil: - dict.

Funny, I thought that greasy is excessively fatty, literally dripping with fat or oil. Actually, those herrings I was talking about are such coz they come in veg oil. And I like greasy/oily stuff coz it goes down so smoothly. hahaha

So, you must be talking about greasy having Irish English on mind coz British English uses greasy in the very context I meant. Just lookie here: What can be greasy in the British English high school textbook exercise below? :):)



Atch 17 | 4,087
29 Apr 2021 #19
British English uses greasy in the very context I meant.

You're a typical Pole, telling a native speaker that they're wrong :)) I'm not using 'Irish' English.

The Oxford Dictionary defines grease as 'Animal fat used or produced in cooking.' Oil on the other hand is defined as 'Any of various viscous liquids which are insoluble in water but soluble in organic solvents and are obtained from animals or plants.'

Native English speakers often make subtle distinctions in their use of words that may have a broadly similar meaning.

Who wrote the text book? Greasy is not a taste; it's a texture and nobody chooses greasy food. The word greasy has negative connotations in everyday English usage. People may enjoy oily foods. Indeed 'oily fish' is a term used for certain categories of fish such as sardines or mackerel but greasy fish would mean fried fish that has been cooked in too much fat and is soggy and revolting :))
gumishu 11 | 5,993
29 Apr 2021 #20
grease

maybe it's better to say herring are fatty? my level of English is not on par with pawian's, so it is just a thought
pawian 187 | 17,898
29 Apr 2021 #21
You're a typical Pole

Yes, exactly. :):):) That`s good coz you know who you are dealing with, isn`t it?? That makes things easier.

As for dictionaries, I offerred a quote from Cambridge one in my last post: Again: greasy - covered with or full of fat or oil:

Yes, I know, you prefer to stick to the old, traditional usage of greasy - I have just checked in a dictionary from 1970-80s. But the language changes and today greasy includes full of oil too.

Who wrote the text book?

Two of the most intelligent ladies I have ever met - authors of my favourite textbooks for all four tier levels - Jenny Dooley and Virginia Evans.

my level of English is not on par with pawian's,

No, come on, you are too modest, I got my main English education in 1970s and 1980s so it is very rusty. :):) But at least I know how to use dictionaries.:):)

American dictionary about greasy

1 : covered with an oily material greasy hands
2 : like or full of fat greasy french fries


but greasy fish would mean fried fish that has been cooked in too much fat

That is why I didn`t use oily so that you didn`t think the herring was naturally oily on its own. I used greasy to express the notion that it had excessive fat from the veg oil it was kept in in the jar. Ha!


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