Return PolishForums LIVE   /   Archives [3]
  PolishForums Archive :
Posts by Polonius3  

Joined: 11 Apr 2008 / Male ♂
Warnings: 1 - Q
Last Post: 9 Apr 2018
Threads: Total: 980 / In This Archive: 289
Posts: Total: 12277 / In This Archive: 8330
From: US Sterling Heigths, MI
Speaks Polish?: yes
Interests: Polish history, genealogy

Displayed posts: 1195 / page 39 of 40
sort: Latest first   Oldest first   |
Polonius3   
22 Apr 2008
Life / Pączki Day, what day is it! [6]

Pączki Day is what Shrove Tuesday (the day before Ash Wednesday) is known as across Polish America. In Poland it is Fat Thursday (Tłusty Czwartek), the preceding Thursday, which ushers in the final, extra-long, 6-day weekend of pre-Lenten merriment.
Polonius3   
21 Apr 2008
Food / The famous Thursday dinners of King Staś [NEW]

King Staś's Thursday Dinners
Poland's last ruling monarch, King Stanisław August Poniatowski (1732-98), affectionately referred to Król Staś, was a patron of the arts and learning known for his famous Thursday dinners, to which he would invite prominent politicians, thinkers and community leaders. In the 1990s, Warsaw Mayor Paweł Piskorski picked up on the tradition by holding Tuesday breakfasts to talk over current issues with leading businessmen and activists. King Stanisław August’s Thursday dinners were mainly a pretext to get together and discuss various topics of the day. Their culinary aspect was therefore secondary and only a few of the foods served have been pieced together by historians. The rest is a matter of speculation. Here is one such sketchy menu:

Starter: Oysters
Soup: barszcz or broth
Meat: Roast lamb and roast grouse
Dessert: Rose preserves
Beverages: water, old Tokay, Spanish wine
Polonius3   
21 Apr 2008
Food / Polish grochówka recipe? [23]

Grochówka żołnierska is definitely yellow split-pea soup. Bean soup is known as fasolówka.
GROCHÓWKA ŻO£NIERSKA (Polish Army-style pea soup -- crowd quantity): This hearty pea soup is one of the things Poles fondly recall from their army days and it is often served on patriotic occasions, especially Polish Soldier’s Day (Aug. 15), and at Polish veterans’ affairs. Essentially it does not differ from the pea soup people cook at home except that it is made in large quantities and is cooked for hours in a field kitchen (a huge, wheel-mounted kettle). In large soup pot combine: 3 gal water; 5-1/2 lbs split yellow peas (or hulled whole yellow dried peas, pre-soaked several hrs or overnight and drained); about 3 lbs mixed diced meats: slab bacon, smoked kiełbasa, smoked hocks or ribs (deboned), fatty ham, scraps or end-pieces of lunch meat, cut-up wieners, etc.; 8 of each: carrots, parsley roots, onions and leeks, diced; 2 small celeriacs, peeled and diced; 3-4 bay leaves and 1/4 c salt. Bring to boil, stirring frequently, reduce heat as low as possible, cover tightly and simmer the living daylights out of it (!) 4-5 hrs. Important: Stir frequently! Towards the end add 3 lbs peeled, diced potatoes and cook until they are very soft. 2-3 pre-soaked dried Bolete mushrooms and their soaking liquid may be added at the start. Alternatively, 2-3 mushrooom bouillon cubes may be added towards the end. Season grochówka with a handful of marjoram and at least 2 T ground pepper to taste. If soup is too thick, dilute with some boiling water. Provide salt, pepper and marjoram as well as a cruet of white vinegar for guests to custom-season their portions. Serve with rye bread. Portions: About 50.

PS - A roux of fried diced bacon (about 1/4 lb) and minced onion (1 cup) with several T flour mixed in and browned may be added towards teh end.
Polonius3   
20 Apr 2008
USA, Canada / Are there any Polish communities in Georgia? [26]

This is only a partial listing, but may be the place to start….
Vero Beach has an unusually large (for Florida) concentration of Pol-Ams.
Polish American Social Club of Vero Beach, Florida, Inc. 7500 North US 1,
Vero Beach, FL 32967
PO Box 6508, Vero Beach, FL 32961-6508
Tel: 561-778-0039
Florida. Sounds of the South at the Polish American Society, 1343 Beach Dr. SE., St. Petersburg, Fla., dinner 2:30-4:00 p.m., $7.50; music 4:00-7:00 p.m., $5 members, $7 non-members. For details call (727) 526-6835.

Florida. Northern Sounds at the Polish American Pulaski Association, Holiday, Fla., 7:00-11:00 p.m. Check locally for details.
Polish-American people and activities may also be encountered at the Polonian parishes of OL of Częstochowa in Pompano Beach and St Joseph’s in Davies, FL.
Polonius3   
20 Apr 2008
Food / Polish hot toddy? [9]

Hot mulled beer (grzane piwo z korzeniami) is also good for colds and insomnia.
In saucepan heat a pint of lager with 3-4 cloves, 1 grain allspice, 3-4 peppercorns, small bit of gingerroot (and a bit of bay leaf -- optional) to below boiling point. Strain. Sweeten to taste with sugar, cherry or raspberry sirup or honey. Drink hot.

Poles claim it also chases your cares away:
CHCESZ POŻEGNAĆ SIĘ Z TROSKAMI, WYPIJ PIWO Z KORZONKAMI!
Polonius3   
20 Apr 2008
Food / How to sour/clabber homogenised store-bought milk [17]

One more Polish hangover remedy is what could be called "POLISH ALKA-SELTZER":
DISSOLVE 1 TEASPOON BAKING SODA IN A GLASS OF COLD WATER, STIR IN A TEASPOON OF WHITE DISTILELD VINEGAR AND DRINK DOWN WHILE IT TURBULENTLY FIZZES.
Polonius3   
19 Apr 2008
Language / misleading differences between Polish and English languages [92]

No, these are faux amis (false friends) -- cognates that mean something different in different langauges although usually they come from the same root. Curve/kurwa are not cognates but constitute a coincidental similarity.
Polonius3   
19 Apr 2008
Genealogy / Agnieszka and Jarosław Bąk - Finding Family in Poland [9]

If you've got their last known address but cannot go to Poland yourself and have no-one there who can track them down for you, you might try a private detective agency. Google: agencje detektywistyczne
Polonius3   
19 Apr 2008
Food / Chicken Pierogi HELP??? [29]

Why not. It'd probably be best to first roast the chkcen, then debone and mince the meat and mix with chopped fried onions, salt & pepper (perhaps add a bit of fresh chopped dill) to taste and use mixture to fill the pierogi. Poles usually use cooked, minced pork and/or beef, but chikcen, esp. the darker drumstick and thigh meat should do very nicely. Good luck!
Polonius3   
19 Apr 2008
Food / How to sour/clabber homogenised store-bought milk [17]

WHEY (serwatka) is among the traditonal Polish hangover remedies. Others include:
-- the juice from brined cucumbers (ogórki kiszone/kwaszone), either straight or mixed 50-50 with cold fizzy mineral water
--sauerkraut juice mixed 50-50 with cold fizzy mineral water
-- cold sour milk (zsziadłe mleko)
-- cold kefir or buttermilk
-- cold fizzy mienral water with lemon
-- cold beer (not good!); it quenches the sufferer's thrist, as do all liquids, and gives a brief sense of relief, but ultimately adds to the hangover which does not end until all the alcohol has been flushed out of the system). Since alcohol drinking leads to dehydration, the lost liquid must be replaced. The above (except for the mienral water which cotnaisn no Vitamin b) also replace the B vitamins and other mineral salts flushed out of the system by the excessive urination which follows alcohol consumption.
Polonius3   
18 Apr 2008
Genealogy / Szmigielski [7]

There are 1,555 Szmigielskis in Poland, the largest concentration found in and around Warsaw.
Polonius3   
18 Apr 2008
Food / Faszerowane Jajka [9]

'Polish Holiday Cookery' has a good recipe for jaja faszerowane w skorupkach.
Polonius3   
18 Apr 2008
Food / Help with baking ingrediants. [18]

Cream of tartar is called winian potasu or potasowy in Polish but is regarded as toxic, hence not generally avialable in shops.
Pure vanilla extract is called esencja waniliowa and is quite pricey. The aromat, whcih is widely used is fake vanilla known as vanillin (wanilina), a synthetic ersatz.
Polonius3   
18 Apr 2008
Food / How to sour/clabber homogenised store-bought milk [17]

Have any of you ever tried to sour (clabber) the homogenised milk sold ij N.America and the UK to use as cold sour milk or to make curd cheese? Due to the spoilage retardants added to homo milk, if set out to clabber it turns extremely bitter. A common practice is to add a cup of dairy sour cream to a gallon (8 pints) of homogenised milk which soemhow neutralises the undesirable bitter-tasting edge. American recipes on the net call for lemon juice when souring milk for farmer cheese. Any ideas on this?
Polonius3   
18 Apr 2008
Genealogy / Trepke family genealogy [2]

Just over 1,000 people in Poland sign theslves Trepka, and a mere 13 use the Gwermanised Trepke spelling. The largest Trepka concentration is in sotuehrn Poland's Silesia region (Śląsk in Polish, Schlesien in German). For more info includign coat of arms, contact research60@gmail
Polonius3   
18 Apr 2008
Genealogy / Looking for the Klarnett Family [13]

I don't know if the Mormons of Salt Lake City have Jewish records on hand, but it's worth checking into. Here in Poland you'd have to touch base with a genealogical researcher. Let me know if interested.
Polonius3   
18 Apr 2008
Genealogy / Origin of surname Berzinski [8]

Berziński cannot exist in Polish. The r+z in Polish form a diagraph (two consonants forming a single sound such as sh and ch in English) which in Polish cannot be followed by the vowel i. There are 15 people who have the rather rare surname Berżyński in Poland.

If the name were of Polish origin it should read Brzeziński (as in Zbigniew). If it were Ruthenian, then it should be Berezinsky (transcribed). More likely than not it got misspelt somewhere on the Ellis Island or other POE circuit.

Brzeziński and Berezinsky would both have probably originated as toponymic nicknames to identify someone as the 'bloke from Birchwood'.
As the population increased before surnames had made the scene, there had to be a way to tell people with the same Christian way apart. So one Jędrek (Andy) was called Stasiak (Stan's boy), another Bednarz (the cooper), still another Paluch (big-fingered Andy), Śliwiński (the guy from Sliwno/Plumboro), Mazur (the Andy who moved here from Masuria), Nawrocki (the one who converted from Judaeism), etc.
Polonius3   
18 Apr 2008
Life / Polish Werewolf myth's and origin stories [12]

Mikołaj Rey (1505-1569), popularly called 'the father of Polish literature' (as to first major author to write entirely in Polish - earlier writers and some contemporaries had included Latin) wrote a 'Fraszka o Wilkołku' ('Fable about the Werewolf'). In general, werewolfery is rather thin in Poland. The term for werewolf is wilkołak, but Rey used an older form: wilkołek.
Polonius3   
18 Apr 2008
Genealogy / POLISH IMMIGRANT NAME-CHANGING [10]

Ridicule and the fear thereof has been a powerful deterrent to many people, and the butchering of Polish surnames was one such area.
In addition to a Jabłkowski and Kosicki being called jabble-COW-ski and ka-ZICK-ee, there's the anecdote about the redneck drill sergeant taking one a look at a recruit's ID tag (with, let's say, Węgrzynkiewicz on it) and saying: "Hey, alphabet, get your arse over here OR you're on KP today!"

A well-meaning way of handling long, unrponounceable Polish (and not only Polish)surnames was to call Adam Szczygieł Mr S or Mary Przywrzejska Miss P.

Russians, Ukrainians, and Bulgarians with similar-sounding names do not run into such problems in the English-speakling world. When they transcribe their Cyrillic surnames into the Latin alphabet, Стоянковский and Яревич become a fairly pronounceablłe Stoyankovsky and Yarevich respectively. A Pole surnamed Stojankowski or Jarewicz would end up being called 'Studge and Cow Ski' and

'Jar o' Wits' respectively.
Polonius3   
17 Apr 2008
Genealogy / POLISH IMMIGRANT NAME-CHANGING [10]

Quite a few Polish surnames come off quite funny-sounding in Anglophonic mouths.
For instance Kwiatkowski (meaning the bloke from Flowerville of Bloomton) can end up sounding like QUIET-COW-SKI.
Then there is a large group of what might be called wicky-wacky surnames (Nowacki, Głowacki, Bielicki, Sawicki) which may even end up sounding like a Japanese delicacy or car marque: eg Szumacki = Soomiyaki.

Another is Wróblewski (the guy from Sparrowwood) which may sound like ROB-A-LOOSE-KEY. One bearer of that surname had an answer to anyone who butchered her surname. She would say: 'Rob a loose key? Hell, I wouldn't even want to rob a tight key!!!' Often the befuddled Anglo-mangler (office clerk, shop assistant, receptionist, whoever) would stutteringly reply: 'Er, um, uh, so that's not how you, er, pronounce it?'

However not every bearer of such a surname has the guts or patience to correct each mispronouncer and in time may give up and go with the flow.

Of course, there are Polish names that are utterly hopeless, and no probably amount of explaining and correcting can change things.
Imagine introducing yourself to your boss or landlord in Dublin or Baltimore if your surname was Szczebrzeszyński, Gżegżółeczka or Chrzęszczykiewicz!!!!!
Polonius3   
17 Apr 2008
Genealogy / POLISH IMMIGRANT NAME-CHANGING [10]

A FEW REMARKS ON IMMIGRANT NAME-CHANGING
POLISH ACCENT MARKS:
Although all those dots, bars squiggles and acute accents may mean little more than fly specks to the average American, in Polish they can make all the difference, even changing a word’s meaning. Example: “los” means fate or destiny in Polish, while “łoś” is an elk (US/Canada: moose). If available, check the immigrant ancestor’s Old World documents (baptismal/birth certificate, passport, steamship-ticket stubs, etc.) for the pre-arrival spelling of his name. Naturalization papers are not good, because they show the post-arrival state of the name which may have shortened, respelled or otherwise modified.

NASAL VOWELS:
Since the nasalizing little squiggles beneath the vowels “ą” and “ę” got lost and were meaningless in America, many Polish immigrants respelled their surnames to retain the original pronunciation. For instance, if left as it was, Dębkowski (something like Oakton or Oakwood in meaning) would end up being pronoucned by rank and file Americans as deb-COW-ski. But if respelled Dembkoski, it retained its perfect pronunciation. The same thing occurred when Bąkowski was respelled Bonkoski (dropping out the “w” gets rid of the “cow”!).

PHONETIC RESPELLINGS:
At times, Polish surnames were respelled in America to make them more pronounceable, and this one is a good example. For instance, since the letters “j”, “w”, “ch”, “cz”, “sz” and others were pronounced differently in Polish and English names such as Jabłoński, Nowak, Chomiński, Czajka and Szymański were respelled as Yablonski, Novak, Hominski, Chayka, and Shymanski. OTHER CHANGES:

Sometiems long names were shortened wtihout losing their Polish idnetity, eg Kołodziejczak > Kołodziej, Chrzanowski > Chrzan, Jeleniewicz > Jeleń or Tomaszewski > Tomasz. Still others were translated adn that usually obliterated the name's ethnic origin; eg Janowicz > Johnson, Bednarski > Cooper, Zima > Winters.

HOW AND WHY?:
Many of the late 19th/early-20th-century immuirgatns were illiterate and unwillingly had their names Anglo-mangled at Ellis Island or other ports of entry. Some were pressured by bosses, teachers or naturalization-class instructors into changing their names or did so voluntarily for the sake of convenience, for business reasons or to avoid ridicule. No-one can be crueller than schoolchildren, and in a N. American school someone named Dombkowski could invariabnbly expect to be taunted with 'Does your DUMB COW SKI?'
Polonius3   
17 Apr 2008
Genealogy / Searching info about Polish relative Poet Leon Pasternak [10]

Leon Pasternak, whose surname means parsnip (a root vegetable), was born in Austrian-occupied Lwów in 1910. A Jewish communist writer, during the inter-war period he belonged to Poland's outlawed Soviet-controlled communist party for which he did time on charges of subversive activities. After Stalin annexed half of Poland in collusion with Hitler in Sept. 1939, Pasternak collaborated with the Soviet occupation forces. A writer, poet and satirist, he used his pen to promte pro-Soviet communist propaganda, unlike his Russian cousin Boris Pasternak (of 'Dr Zhivago' fame), who became disissluioned with communism.
Polonius3   
16 Apr 2008
Genealogy / Looking for the Klarnett Family [13]

We are talking about the possible origin of the surname Klarnet (in whatever spelling), and that has no conection to your ancestor's practiced profession. By then Klarnet was probably already fuicntioning as an inherited surname, so he did not take on the name Schneider (Tailor), as people of earlier centuries would have done. Just as people today named Piekarz (Polish), Becker (German/Yiddish) or Baker do not necesdsarily bake bread for a living. Schwarz or Schwartz is German/Yiddish for black. The original bearer may have ineed been dark-complected with raven hair, but again that does not mean someone several generations on looked exactly ther same. Or he may have been called that for toponymic reasons, ie he hailed from Schwarzfeld or Schwarzdorf (Blackfield or Blackville).
Polonius3   
16 Apr 2008
Genealogy / Looking for Kozakiewicz (and various spellings), Lugowski/ska and Dunajko [3]

There are nearly 5,500 Kozakiewiczes in today's Poland, many living in the so-called recovered territories, assigned to Poland by the WW2 Big Three and populated largely by repatriates from the Soviet-annexed east and their descendants. The name is a patronymic meaning "son of the Cossack".

£ugowski started out as a toponymic nickname to mean "the bloke from Lyeville" and is shared by 3,900. Dunajko is on the rare side (only 204 users) and probably was originally used to identify someone hailing from the River Danube area.

For more information contact research60@gmail
Polonius3   
15 Apr 2008
Genealogy / Kochan and Mokowo, Poland [14]

Try Kochany (as a place-name) and Kochan as a surnmame. Kohan is a phonetic respelling designed to retain the proper procnunciaton. Otherwise English speakers would Anglo-mangle it into something like Cutchen.
Polonius3   
15 Apr 2008
Genealogy / RELEWICZ surname. Can you help me? [6]

Indeed, 88 of Poland's 122 Relewiczes hail from the Poznań area, apparently the name's ancestral stronghold.
Polonius3   
15 Apr 2008
Genealogy / Kaninski [12]

There are only 5 peopel named Kaniński in Poland and all must be loners, widows, widowers, old maids or bachelors, because they live in 5 different cities acorss Poland.

By comparison there are nearly 88,000 Kamińskis.
Polonius3   
15 Apr 2008
Genealogy / Bula surname [4]

It might be Buła (with a barred £) which in Polish would mean a large bun, loaf or by extension any large bulge. It can alłso mean an uncouth clod or bumpkin (redneck in Americanese). Entirely by coincidence the term is also used as a translation of bull (papal bull), meaning an authoritative document issued by the Supreme Pontiff. That latter seems the least likely soruce of your name.