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How to sour/clabber homogenised store-bought milk


Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446  
18 Apr 2008 /  #1
Have any of you ever tried to sour (clabber) the homogenised milk sold ij N.America and the UK to use as cold sour milk or to make curd cheese? Due to the spoilage retardants added to homo milk, if set out to clabber it turns extremely bitter. A common practice is to add a cup of dairy sour cream to a gallon (8 pints) of homogenised milk which soemhow neutralises the undesirable bitter-tasting edge. American recipes on the net call for lemon juice when souring milk for farmer cheese. Any ideas on this?
ArcticPaul 38 | 233  
18 Apr 2008 /  #2
You should sell it. You have spotted a gap in the market for 'retards homo milk'.

Seriously...would the UHT sterilised stuff favoured in France/Germany/BeNeLux be any better for this kind of thing?
Or does one need 'traditional' straight from the cow type stuff?
miranda  
18 Apr 2008 /  #3
You should sell it. You have spotted a gap in the market for 'retards homo milk'.

this is why I love PF;D
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
18 Apr 2008 /  #4
Have any of you ever tried to sour (clabber) the homogenised milk sold ij N.America and the UK to use as cold sour milk or to make curd cheese?

Put it in the oven on low (60 to 70 Deg. Celsius). It'll take about a day for the milk to get where you want to it.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446  
18 Apr 2008 /  #5
It is marketed in Polish groceries and delis in N. America as zsiadłe mleko alongside the kefir, maślanka (buttermilk) and jogurt (yoghurt).
Dice 15 | 452  
18 Apr 2008 /  #6
You need to boil the milk first; this will take care of the homogenization. But be careful - you want to stir it with a whisk while heating it to avoid boiling over. You could land up with a big mess in your kitchen. Maybe that's why the online recipes call for putting the milk into the oven. Later, you need to add some yogurt or sour cream to start the cultivation of needed enzymes. I made some white farmer's cheese this way once - it was pretty good :)
Piorun - | 658  
18 Apr 2008 /  #7
You need to boil the milk first

You don’t need to boil it. Freshly purchased milk from the store is already sterilized. Heating process is only for texture so it comes out grainy not stringy. This is how I make it.

Homemade “twaróg” white farmers cheese

1 Gallon of milk
1 Pint of Buttermilk
12 Oz Sour Cream

Combine all ingredients in a large pot, Mix gently to distribute culture throughout the milk. cover with cheese cloth set aside at room temperature for 1 to 3 days depending on the condition. Important do not stir during this stage just let it sit there for 1 to 3 days. This stage will usually take anywhere from 1.5 to 2 days.

Heat the coagulated milk over low fire stirring it from time to time, DO NOT LET IT BOIL. Separate cheese from whey by straining it through cheesecloth. Hang the cheese in cheesecloth over the pot to drain access whey. I usually do it for 7 hours otherwise it’s too moist. Transfer the cheese from the cloth into a small container. Keep refrigerated until consumption.

If you like you can keep the byproduct “Whey” for other purposes by keeping it refrigerated.
ArcticPaul 38 | 233  
19 Apr 2008 /  #8
Twarog !!!
I used to work with a kid called Magik Twarog.

I'm not making this up.
Is it a known Polish name?
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446  
19 Apr 2008 /  #9
WHEY (serwatka) is among the traditonal Polish hangover remedies. Others include:
-- the juice from brined cucumbers (ogórki kiszone/kwaszone), either straight or mixed 50-50 with cold fizzy mineral water
--sauerkraut juice mixed 50-50 with cold fizzy mineral water
-- cold sour milk (zsziadłe mleko)
-- cold kefir or buttermilk
-- cold fizzy mienral water with lemon
-- cold beer (not good!); it quenches the sufferer's thrist, as do all liquids, and gives a brief sense of relief, but ultimately adds to the hangover which does not end until all the alcohol has been flushed out of the system). Since alcohol drinking leads to dehydration, the lost liquid must be replaced. The above (except for the mienral water which cotnaisn no Vitamin b) also replace the B vitamins and other mineral salts flushed out of the system by the excessive urination which follows alcohol consumption.
grethomory 1 | 154  
19 Apr 2008 /  #10
Why not buy butter milk? It is already sour and clabbored
miranda  
19 Apr 2008 /  #11
it is not the same. Butter milk is left over form butter making process or a tleast it used to be. It has a different taste and different consistency.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446  
20 Apr 2008 /  #12
One more Polish hangover remedy is what could be called "POLISH ALKA-SELTZER":
DISSOLVE 1 TEASPOON BAKING SODA IN A GLASS OF COLD WATER, STIR IN A TEASPOON OF WHITE DISTILELD VINEGAR AND DRINK DOWN WHILE IT TURBULENTLY FIZZES.
grethomory 1 | 154  
26 Apr 2008 /  #13
Wouldn't this be the same as buttermilk? You can buy it in the stores.
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
26 Apr 2008 /  #14
One more Polish hangover remedy is what could be called "POLISH ALKA-SELTZER":

None of the "remedies" described here is effective. At least not after hard liquor.

What will be effective is anything containing a good doze of fat. Hot/warm chicken soup is probably the easiest to get and use. Milk based drinks will be OK the morning after if there was too much wine, since milk is a decent antidote to the acidity of wine.

It's grade 7 chemistry, dear children, second semester - organic chemistry. Or at least used to be when I was 13. Yup, they gave us all the hints they could :))
F15guy 1 | 160  
27 Apr 2008 /  #15
Have any of you ever tried to sour (clabber) the homogenised milk

Polonius3: Vinegar works well to sour the milk. My grandmother's banana bread recipe calls for sour milk which she always made by adding a little vinegar to regular homogenized milk. (You had the answer already.)
plk123 8 | 4,148  
22 Feb 2009 /  #16
Freshly purchased milk from the store is already sterilized.

is it pasteurized?
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446  
1 Mar 2009 /  #17
Twaróg (curd cheese or pot cheese) is a common Polish surname. By Magic you probably meant Maciek, short for Maciej (Matthias).

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