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Posts by kaznoad  

Joined: 31 Oct 2010 / Male ♂
Last Post: 8 Nov 2010
Threads: -
Posts: 30
From: Poland, Warsaw
Speaks Polish?: yes

Displayed posts: 30
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kaznoad   
8 Nov 2010
UK, Ireland / The more subtle differences: Ireland/Britain v Poland [310]

Just a fact. English food IS bad.

Your opinion. - hardly fact.

You're becoming a little boring ;-)

You are good at it too it seems.

Look closer. I'm fine. Thank's.

I'd rather not thank you.

Your simply not an agricultural country.

And that is supposed to mean what exactly?

Thank's, but I enjoy Germany.

Good for you. Do you want a medal?

Nothing special, if you don't consider more differentiation and other experiences like that.

I talk from actual experience. You speculate and have a creative imagination.

Funny clip, but lousy quality. Nothing special. What about 'your' guys in Spain? Nice. 5.000 drunken Brits in a resort. That's cultural exchange.

Ever been to Italy and enjoyed the "company" of Poles. Better still - go to a Polish "football match" - that's if you are brave enough.

Are you projecting??

Just an observation. Is there a problem?

Thank you, again.

About one million Poles can't be wrong I suppose. What's your excuse? As I said if you like Poland so much and think you know it so well - why don't you live there? It's a rhetorical question as I can already guess the answer LOL!
kaznoad   
7 Nov 2010
UK, Ireland / The more subtle differences: Ireland/Britain v Poland [310]

I'm not insulting anybody. Simplification just su**s.

You mean like your simplification that English food is bad?

I guess not ;-) He's too obsessed.

With what exactly?

Playing 'ping-pong'?

I repeat. Your ignorance is breathtaking.

I'm fine. Thank's for asking.

Just an observation. I imagine I am probably not the first.

Thank's again for your concern, but no, I did not need any diet when returning. I'm 2,00m tall by 95kg, still.

I thought you lived in the UK - so how could that be? I think you should know you that I am the Pope.

Never said that. I'm sure there is also lousy food, but to take Brits food for comparison which has almost nothing good, beside meat, that's annoying. Your simply not an agricultural country. Not known for it.

You certainly suggested it. In fact you repeat it agin in this post. Do you make a habit of contradicting yourself? Your last sentence neither makes sense nor is it correct English.

'Nice' stereotypes in direction of the 'poor' Polish people. Sorry, but did you have 'bad' experiences? Did someone use or abuse you?

After 20 years of living there I can say I have had bad and good. I just pointed out an unfortunate reality. You wouldn't know about such things preseumably as you only visit the country for short periods.

They surely have a problem then. Cannot see one good reason why that choice. Send the polish women to the Balkans...

Well you can't see a lot of things from what I can gather from your posts. Perhaps it is you with the problem?

Brits not? They are even 'gentlemen' while filling themselves up? Man, you see the world just in black and white. So full of stereotypes, prejudices about Polish people. Why do you live there at all?

I suppose your impressions must have been gained from the company you like to keep. Time for a change perhaps? Prom your posts it seems to me that it is you with the stereotype and prejudiced views. There is nothing like pontificating about life in Poland when you don't actually live there. I invite you to broaden your mind a little. Come to think of it, if the country is so wonderful why don't you live there and why have so many well educated, skilled and decent Poles left the place to go an live in....England?

I thought that nickname is already given to the Brits=Islandmonkeys...

Sascha. I invite you to broaden your narrow mind and enjoy some Polish "cultural" entertainment! Enjoy also the "sophisticated" language whilst you are at it.

youtube.com/watch?v=cuRIMBCLZ1Q
kaznoad   
7 Nov 2010
UK, Ireland / The more subtle differences: Ireland/Britain v Poland [310]

I thought it was budyn

They use both terms. The Poles make this gue that they call "budyn" as you say, but it is not really custard. Anyway they serve it cold - ugggghhhhh!
kaznoad   
7 Nov 2010
UK, Ireland / The more subtle differences: Ireland/Britain v Poland [310]

And do you do that every time you wash your hands?
I didn't.

No, but then it depends what you are washing I suppose, as well as how dirty it is. If you look at my previous post what the Poles actually do is have the mixer permanently on hot. So the effect is just the sam as using a hot tap. Now does that sound sensible to you?

Naw, I think two taps are ridiculous not me :)

I am not saying they are better than a mixer. I prefer mixers. Each to his own I suppose.
kaznoad   
7 Nov 2010
UK, Ireland / The more subtle differences: Ireland/Britain v Poland [310]

The general idea is to fill the wash basin with water and to wash in that when it is the right temperature. Filling any basin with water is something the Poles are not used to. They prefer to wash under the stream of water whilst it runs straight down the drain. Either system has its faults and merits. The problem is with the user, not the system.
kaznoad   
7 Nov 2010
UK, Ireland / The more subtle differences: Ireland/Britain v Poland [310]

Poles eat custard cold - that is correct, although they call it "sos". In any case it is a rarity as is any desert.

As for washing up - you have a point. The fact is normally they do not actually use a sink as a wash basin. They simply run the water and wash everything under the stream. They do not plug up the sink or use a separate sink for rinsing.

When Poles used to visit me in the UK they used to laugh at the separate hot and cold water taps we have. However, in truth when Poles use their mixer taps they have them switched permanently on hot - so the whole point of using a mixer tap to obtain the optimum temperature is ignored.
kaznoad   
7 Nov 2010
UK, Ireland / The more subtle differences: Ireland/Britain v Poland [310]

I say your stupidity stinks..

Your igorance of the subject is breathtaking.

What makes you say that? Not at all.

You mean this is your "natural" state?

Got your point, but I traveled a lot in Poland and never was disappointed in their food and actually what you offer as a comparison is a farce.

Travelling around the country and living there are two different things. If you have "never been disappointed in their food" then lucky for you. I suggest you try one of those revolting jelly covered dishes - or tripe.

Perhaps you had the advantage of being able to return to your normal diet when you returned to your home. I am not saying Polish food is all bad - far from it. I like a lot of it. However, to suggest it is all good is total nonsense. In fact that is as much nonsense as your suggestion that all English food is bad. The truth is that real traditional English food is simply unkown to most Poles and your comment that it is not good food reflects as much your ignorance as it does theirs.

I know a lot. Still have friends there.

Don't kid yourself. If you actually lived in Poland you would soon find out what sort of real "friends" they are. Many Poles simply want to have some connection with somebody from the West because they may benefit from it. It's an unpleasant, but very real phenomenon.

Your mechanism of seeing Polish and British drinking habits is called splitting. All you do is demonizing it. It seems you dislike your Polish half.
What about the vomiting and stumbling Brits coming out of 'the pub' not knowing where they are...?

I was perfectly serious. It shows again your ignorance of the reality of contemporary Poland. Polish men drink to get drunk. They do not drink to spend a pleasant evening over a drink. Yes there are plenty of English drunks - just take a look on any English high street on a Friday or Saturday night. I find it disgusting personally. However, have you seen what happens when Polish men have "a drink"? I doubt it. They drink until they are unconcious. Before they pass out (anywhere - ditches, park benches, stairways, on busses etc..) they engage is loud swearing matches, fights, urinating almost anywhere they can find a spot - the more public the better. The sight is truly obnoxious. I can well understand why Polish women prefer English men - they seem cultured in comparison to the usual apes available t them.

Some kind of 'Western world' phenomenon. In Germany f.e. you can experience the same. What is your point?

My point was very clear. Poles do not drink for pleasure. They drink to get drunk. Read my post again.
kaznoad   
7 Nov 2010
UK, Ireland / The more subtle differences: Ireland/Britain v Poland [310]

I know that the truth hurts. Sorry man.
Btw, I am not Polish.

Truth? What is your point exactly?

Good for them.

They say ignorance is bliss.

Man! Desserts. How can you praise desserts. Pies? Muss brechen. What is that at all? That's what you offer is pathetic.

You sound a very bitter person. My point was that Polish cooking has nothing to offer in comparison which is as remotely enjoyable.

No, but the Poles I met during vacation were slim, whereas the UK imports had the weights ;-)
The last statistics I read on the German health institute did not mention fat Poles but fat UKers, yes. On pole position.
Alcohol? What about your pubers? Too much black and white, man.
Read in some yellow press magazine that some 17 year old teenage girl has/had 20ltrs. of vine per week. Not bad. Keep the spirit. ;-)

You clearly don't know much about the Poles. I have lived in the country for 20 years and am of English/Polish origin. Polish men as a rule are unfit, uncouth and have no sense of style whatsoever, quite in contrast to Polish women. They have no sense of humour, an over inflated opinion of themselves and their place in the world. They love junk food and above all - strong alcohol in large amounts. Sure there are plenty of Brits who like to drink - but must drink for pleasure and not with the aim of getting drunk. That's why British pubs are such a great institution - they are a place for socialising whilst having a drink or two. Your average Polish man does not drink for pleasure as such, but to "impress" his colleagues through outdrinking them and getting themselves paralytic as fast as possible. It's quite educating watching them at it. I invite you to visit Poland and enjoy the real Polish drinking "experience".
kaznoad   
6 Nov 2010
News / Polish Lithuanian Diplomatic War? At last. [418]

Why should there be an issue at all? I remember when the law was introduced about 10 years ago. It was dreamt up by ultra nationalists (and by now way does that exclude the left in Polish politics) as a reaction to their impression of increasing use of English in the country for names and business etc. The fact is that it is simply an unacceptable practice.
kaznoad   
6 Nov 2010
News / Polish Lithuanian Diplomatic War? At last. [418]

Then why has Poland introduced laws which forbid the registration of names it deems as being non Polish? An English friend of mine with a Polish wife and living in the country tried to register their newly born baby with a purely English (well Welsh actually) Christian name. The registration was refused. In the end not to be undone he went with his wife and registered the birth in the UK. They then presented the "de-facto" name to the Poles. Does this sound like civilised behaviour on the part of the Poles?
kaznoad   
6 Nov 2010
UK, Ireland / The more subtle differences: Ireland/Britain v Poland [310]

Indeed. When it comes to women it is the other way round with the English tending to be fat and the Poles being slim - at least until they are about 35 or so. So the ideal combination is an English youg man and a Polish young girl. Sounds like heaven eh?

Next differnece polish people like to judge people even if they don'y know facts.

It's a national pastime.
kaznoad   
6 Nov 2010
UK, Ireland / The more subtle differences: Ireland/Britain v Poland [310]

Your opinion reflects the average, ignorant version the Poles put out. However, the simple truth is most Poles have never tasted any real traditional English food. It simply is nowadays in the UK quite a rarity which is rather sad. For example English deserts (i.e. various pies, trifles and crumbles) are wonderful. When Poles do have deserts (which is almost never) what they offer up is pathetic. I will hand it to them with the soups though. They make much better ones than the English soups I used to eat.

As for the English being fat - have you actually travelled around Poland recently? It's an eye opener. Polish men are fatter than most English men - by a long way. Too often they are a lot more drunk as well. I suppose that comes with the monotonous diet of fat filled sausage, oil fried meat and high cholesterol foods they seem to adore.
kaznoad   
6 Nov 2010
UK, Ireland / The more subtle differences: Ireland/Britain v Poland [310]

And Polish "breakfasts" are a joke. The same boring and pretty tasteless stuff (tasteless rubbery cheese and the same cold ham and sausage) shoved under your nose every day - of course cold. Perhaps Polish breakfasts are more suited to the summer, but definately not the winter. Give me a traditional fried British breakfast anyday - it knocks the socks of what the Poles have to eat each morning. Generally I like Polish food - but Polish breakfasts simply don't cut any ice with me. No competition at all I am afraid - with or without baked beans.
kaznoad   
4 Nov 2010
News / "Letter from Poland" (List z Polski) by the Netherlands TV - [9]

The film does not represent the views of many - if not most Poles. It represents the views of a paranoid minority for whom conspiracy theories are the food of life. The last thing that enters the narrow minds of such people is that their own countrymen can behave in such an irresponsible and wreckless manner by trying to land a plane in thick fog and without suitable equipment either at the airport or on board the plane, against the explicit advise of the air port controllers. The unfortunate reality of the crash in Smolensk is that it was almost certainly entirely avoidable, but due to criminal wrecklessness on the part of some of those on board (and the black box cock pit voice recordings seem to confirm this probability), the pilots were instructed or pursuaded to land (by a person or persons on board the plane) against their will and despite being advised several times not to land.

Instead of looking for scape goats to blame for the accident such people as the narrator in this documentary would do well to investigate how to prevent such an accident ever happening again. It seems that if there were any procedures in place they certainly were not followed. Specifically they should concentrate on ensuring that new procedures are put in place and enforced preventing the President and chiefs of the armed forces from ever travelling together on the same plane again, and that the pilot has the final decision (free from any threat of subsequent disciplinary action) when it comes to the saftey of the plane and its passengers. It astounds me that even now, and despite all that has happened, this issue has hardly been discussed at all in Poland.
kaznoad   
3 Nov 2010
News / Polish Lithuanian Diplomatic War? At last. [418]

Poland will not use them when registering anyone officially - they'll just use the nearest comparable Latin letter. So - if Poles want to register their names using Polish letters, then they have to allow everyone else to use their letters, too. Can't see that happening, somehow.

If that is the case then so be it. I have no issue with this.

I have never seen her documents. However, I have noticed at every official event (in Poland or elsewhere) her name was always spelt using the German "u"

Well, in the UK, you won't catch people using ł, ś, ć, ó, ą, etc in official documents. Even things such as the EEA residency permit and driving licences will be in "plain" Latin letters. Likewise in most of Europe - the unique letters simply aren't recognised.

.
I agree - not usually in official documents. Nevertheless one reason for this is historical as it is related to the fact that until recently only English letters were available on typewriters in the UK. Foreigners in the UK commonly use their own spellings for most purposes and this does not cause either insult or any problem. For instance many French and Spanish names in the UK continue to be spelt with their unique linguistic letters. In fact the use of the female version of Polish names (i.e. ending in "ska") is increasingly common also in the UK, even if most English people do not understand its significance.
kaznoad   
3 Nov 2010
News / Polish Lithuanian Diplomatic War? At last. [418]

Would this be like how Poland refuses to allow the registration of RHD cars?

Well if you what to make such a ridiculous connection then it is clear who is being unreasonable in this case. I fail to understand your problem with the use of unique Polish letters. Poland's EU Commissioner until recently was Danuta Hubner. I can't write the correct spelling here but she used the German "u" or "umlout" in here name. Obviously this never caused the Poles any difficult so why would using Polish letters for Polish names create such a "difficult" problem in Lithuania. Incidently I would expect the Poles to be equally tollerant towards the Lithuanian minority in North Eastern Poland. Frankly speaking I think your position is childish.
kaznoad   
3 Nov 2010
News / Polish Lithuanian Diplomatic War? At last. [418]

So? Doesn't matter what it used to be like, all that matters is the here and now. And right now, Vilnius is Lithuanian.

I was not suggesting that Vilnius is Polish. However, there is still a sizeable Polish minority in the city and in some districts Poles actually are still in the majority. In such cases it seems only reasonable to recognise the actual situation. It is not just reasonable, but it is also required according to EU rules. I see no good reason why this should be so difficult to accept when in Poland the German minority has been given similar rights and privilages.
kaznoad   
3 Nov 2010
News / Upping the speed limit in Poland [92]

Some of them are new, but they only have two lanes on which lorries can - and do - overtake at will and without warning. The current speed limit in Poland is already higher than in many, if not most, EU countries, but the traffic saftey and management record in the country is attrocious. It is ludicrous to suggest raising the speed limit in a country which has just about the highest number of road deaths in Europe. What Poland really needs is better roads, more motorways - ideally 3 lane with an additional emergency lane - and more observance of the traffic laws. Only then could one seriously consider raising the speed limit. Much of the A4 motorway in southern Poland for instance does not even have an emergency lane with the obvious consequences. Anyway most of the time on Polish motorways it is impossible to even keep an average speed of over 100 km because of lorries constantly overtaking and blocking the "fast lane". In addition you have some car drivers who sit in the "fast lane" regardless of their own speed and how many cars they are holding up behind them. There is no concept here of using the "fast lane" primarily for overtaking. Cars overtake on either side of you at will and at crazy speeds. The result is that the "fast lane" moves for much of the time only slightly faster than the "slow lane". Does it make sense therefore to increase an already only theoretical speed limit?
kaznoad   
3 Nov 2010
News / Polish Lithuanian Diplomatic War? At last. [418]

So if Poles are the majority in a part of London (for example) should London change it's street names to Polish?
and should the same apply to the Russians who live in Lithuania and London?

As far as I am aware London was never part of Polish territory. Much or Lithuania and all of Vilnius used to be in Poland. Perhaps you should read some history before making a fool out of yourself again.
kaznoad   
2 Nov 2010
News / Upping the speed limit in Poland [92]

"Only driving faster when conditions dictate it is safe to do so". Well that then rules out 99% of all Polish roads - including most of the motorways. Have you ever driven on Polish roads?
kaznoad   
2 Nov 2010
News / Upping the speed limit in Poland [92]

The motorway section you refer to is not empty at all. It has a continual stream of lorries on it which overtake without any notice forcing car drivers to brake hard. I travel on this motorway frequently. Increasing the speed limit will only invite more accidents. It is dangerous enough to drive on already. The proposal to increase the speed limits on Polish roads is ludicrous in the context of the high death toll. Before encouraging even more wreckless, aggressive and inconsiderate Polish drivers to drive even faster than they do now perhaps thought should be given to encouraging safer driving and the observance of the traffic laws.
kaznoad   
2 Nov 2010
Law / UK driving license mess in Poland [69]

Number 2 without a doubt. Of course you will actually need to still have some sort of UK address. If not use the address of any other family member - of course with their knowledge.
kaznoad   
2 Nov 2010
News / Upping the speed limit in Poland [92]

What expressways and motorways? There are hardly any in the country. As I said before the exisiting speed limits are totally ignored by drivers and the Police do not patrol these roads. The proposals sound a recipe for further carnage on Poland's roads. Isn't there enough carnage already?
kaznoad   
2 Nov 2010
Law / Polish Citizenship for a foreigner whose parents was born in Poland [174]

It may come as a shock but you already have Polish nationality. Any child of a Polish citizen automatically has Polish nationality whether he/she applies for it or not. That is the way Polish law works. However, in order to obtain a Polish passport you will need to supply proof that at least one of your parents was Polish e.g. birth certificate, passport etc. Provided you can do this then obtaining a passport is just a formality. A word of caution though before you leap into action. The Polish authorities apply their nationality law in a strange way. According to the law when a Polish national is present in the territory of the Polish Republic no other nationality held by that person has any legal bearing. In other words according to Polish law once you step foot in Poland (and have Polish nationality), whatever other nationality/ies you have ceases to have any legal meaning or weight. You are treated exclusively as a Pole regardless of where you were born, whether you can speak Polish, or whether you have ever either considered yourself to be Polish.

I can vouch for the above information as I obtained a Polish passport 20 years ago on the basis of the fact that my father was Polish. The process did not take long and it was useful to me then as at that time I needed to obtain a visa to visit Poland. 10 years later I renounced my Polish nationality due to the selective application of the above interpretation regarding my nationality of birth. In my experience in the longer term the obtaining of a Polish passport caused me far more problems than it was worth.
kaznoad   
2 Nov 2010
News / Upping the speed limit in Poland [92]

Increasing the speed limit is pointless in my opinion. Whatever "limit" is set will be as equally ignored by the majority of Polish drivers as the current ones. How about actually enforcing the laws that do exist rather than relaxing them because there is no capacity or will power to enforce them? The numbers of deaths on Polish roads is a national disgrace and encouraging people to drive even faster on the existing poor roads will only create an even worse situation.
kaznoad   
2 Nov 2010
News / RHD cars in Poland - my campaign to change the rules in Poland [128]

Hello Charles,
I read your posts with great interest about trying to register a RHD car in Poland. I am in the same situation as you as I also have a specially adapted RHD (British) car which my wife and I use to transport our disabled son around. I would like to know if you got anywhere with your attempts to have your car registered in Poland. I spoke today with somebody in the Ministry of Transport who confirmed that, whilst in theory it was possible to register a RHD car in Poland on the basis of special permission from the Ministry, in practice no private individual has been able to do this. The only RHD vehicles that were allowed to be registered were RHD road cleaning machines. Furthermore the person said that the Ministry had no plans to change the current restrictive. The person I spoke to suggested that despite the poor track record I make a formal application to register my car if only to prove that the process is not worth a fig. I intend to do this and send a copy of my application (and any further correspondence with the Ministry of Transport) to the European Ombudsman to demonstrate that the Polish government is flouting EU law. Perhaps then the EU will finally force Poland to fall into line with the rest of the EU. The Polish government's stance with regard to this issue is totally unacceptable.

Regards,

Adam Kaznowski