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Sensational : the biblical Philistines - were they Slavic people?

Ziemowit Activity: 6 / 2,222
Joined: 8 May 2009 ♂
 
15 Dec 2016  #1

Giancarlo T. Tomezzoli of Etno-Archaeological Observatory (Munich, Germany) and Reinhardt S. Stein of Universiteit Utrecht (Uithof, Holland) say in their paper* published this year that one inscription from an ostracon** made from local clay appears to have a specific meaning of: "People come in, we see" or in loose translation: "Come and see". Such a meaning has been revealed through the analysis of all the possible 27 spellings of the inscription of which one, compared with the present surviving Slavic languages, showed this specific meaning.

In conclusion, the authors of the paper say:

The inscription and the considerations developed in this article indicate that the Philistines of the ancient Ashkelon, or the Philistines in general, was a Proto-Slavic tribe or people which spoke a non-survived Proto-Slavic language, which settled in the south part of present Israel in the Iron Age, i.e. well before the VII century A.D. generally accepted period of the Slavs arrival in Eastern Europe.

The Philistines were an ancient people primarily known for their conflict with the Israelites described in the Bible. The origin and the nature of the Philistines is an enigma for the contemporary historical studies. They appear to have first settled the Aegean area and then, as a Sea People, around 1200 B.C. to have invaded and settled the south part of present Israel.

scirp.org/Journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=69428

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*) Tomezzoli, G. and Stein, R. (2016) The Philistine Inscription 4.5 from Ashkelon (Israel). Advances in Anthropology, 6, 45-50
**) ostracon is a piece of pottery, usually broken off from a vase or other earthenware vessel

OP Ziemowit Activity: 6 / 2,222
Joined: 8 May 2009 ♂
 
16 Dec 2016  #2

More details now on the deciphered ancient text:

It reads: [L]*IUDI PADI PA WEDIMI (* Possible lost letter on the right of the inscription)

LIUDI - Gsl. subst: people;
Bos. Люди-people; Cro. Ljudi-people; Mac. луѓе-people; Pol. Ludzie- people; Rus. Люди-people; Ser. Људи-people; Slo. Ljudj-people; Slov. „udia.-people; Cze. lidé- people; Ukr. Люди-people.

PADI - Gsl. verb in imp. tense: come!;
Cro. Došete-come; Mac. Oди-come; Slo. Pojdi-come; Rus. Поди- come; Ser. Дођи-come; Ukr. Піди-come.

PA - Gsl. pre.: on, in, at;
Bos. Po-in, on; Bul. По-in, on, at; Cro. Po-in, on; Lit. po-in, on, at; Pol. Po-in, on, at; Rus. По-in, on, at; Ser. По-in, on, at; Ukr. По-in, on.

WEDIMI - Gsl. v. pres. tense, 2nd plur. pers.: we see;
Mac. видиме-we see; Bul. ние виждаме-we see; Cro. Vidimo-we see; Rum.Vedem-we see; Rus.мы видим-we see; Ser. Видимо-we see; Slov. Vidimo-we see; Cze. Vidime-we see; Ukr. ми бачимо-we see.

From the above spelling and its interpretation, the consequent translation of the inscription is: People come in, we see, or in loose translation: Come and see. Probably, the inscription was an invitation to the public to dis-cover and/or to ta ste the content of the jar.

Abreviations: Bos. Bosnian; Bul. Bulgarian; Cro. Croatian; Cze. Czech; Gsl. Generally Slavic; imp. Imperative; Lit. Lithuanian; Mac. Macedonian; Pol. Polish; pre. Preposition; pres. Present; Rum. Rumanian; Rus. Russian; Ser. Serbian; Slo. Slovenian; Slov. Slovakian; Ukr. Ukrainian; v. Verb
gumishu Activity: 10 / 4,156
Joined: 6 Apr 2009 ♂
 
16 Dec 2016  #3

More details now on the deciphered ancient text:

you seriously believe this 'translation' - man Slavs have been non-entity before about 5th century AD
OP Ziemowit Activity: 6 / 2,222
Joined: 8 May 2009 ♂
 
16 Dec 2016  #4

man Slavs have been non-entity before about 5th century AD

They were a 'non-entity' in Central Europe according to one theory (allochtonic one). But even if they arrived and settled on the territory of the present-day Poland and Eastern Germany in that famous 6th century (500 - 600 AD), they must have come from somewhere. And they would have lived there and speak some language and thus they would have came along with this language which may be called the Proto-Slavic language today. And it is exactly this ancient language which the authors of the paper claim to be the language of that ancient Philistine inscription dating from the 12th century BC..

If that were true, it would be totally sensational from the Slavic point of view. The text could be the first ever known script of the Proto-Slavic language, but of course, more texts and among them longer ones is needed to confirm this intriguing discovery.
gumishu Activity: 10 / 4,156
Joined: 6 Apr 2009 ♂
 
16 Dec 2016  #5

The text could be the first ever known script of the Proto-Slavic language, but of course, more texts and among them longer ones is needed to confirm this intriguing discovery.

Ziemowit this 'translation' is simply rubbish - and if Slavs migrated into central Europe from somewhere it was from northern Ukraine (as proven by linguistic history of proto-Slavic language (borrowings from Gothic and East-Iranian (pontic) languages as well as affinity with Baltic languages)

Phillistine might have (which is rather unprobable) been an Indo-European language but definitely not Slavic



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Sensational : the biblical Philistines - were they Slavic people?
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