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What Polish foods do foreigners generally not take to?


OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
19 May 2017 #61
often overcooked?

Never took a survey, but I personally never experienced any being overcooked. Some added a bit of cornflower to the grated-potato mixture which give them a kind of rubbery bounciness. In general however Poles do not fancy al dente pasta and like it to be tender, but not overcooked.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
19 May 2017 #62
quite the delicacy in 19th century Poland

To this day czernina is best known in Wielkopolska, and Poznań alone has seversal restruants specialising in duck soup (including: hacjenda.poznan.pl/
The reason for its popularity in Polonia is that the first wave of Polish immirgants to America (starting around 1850) came mainly from hte Prussian occupation zone and brought their culinary habits with them. The Kongresiarze and Galony (Galicjoki) followed, as those from Russian and Austrian-ruled Poladn were popularly referred to.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
19 May 2017 #63
puts me off a bi

What about kaszanka, Blutwurst, boudin, black pudding, etc. Don't they all contain blood?
DominicB - | 2,709
19 May 2017 #64
The reason for its popularity in Polonia is that the first wave of Polish immirgants to America (starting around 1850) came mainly from hte Prussian occupation zone

Not a one of which was to be found anywhere near where I grew up, which was populated by people from the Suwalszczyna and Galicja, and who had little or no contact with Poles from the Prussian partition.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
19 May 2017 #65
Suwalszczyna and Galicja

My grandmother was from the Lublin region (Kongresówka) but because of cultural sharing learnt to cook czernina in America from Wielkapolska-born neighbour ladies.
DominicB - | 2,709
19 May 2017 #66
@Polonius3

That wasn't the case with my grandparents, or anyone else from my area.
gregy741 4 | 1,204
19 May 2017 #67
My grandmother was from the Lublin region

i was born and grow in ;Lublin area..this duck soup i never heard of ,when i was living there.certainly it is not popular in that region.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
19 May 2017 #68
duck soup

Read up on czernina on wikipedia

czernina
jon357 67 | 16,655
20 May 2017 #69
I had some czernina today in Płock. It was probably the worst czernina I'd had - really acidic as if they'd emptied half a bottle of vinegar in. No dried fruit either, something that good czernina usually has. I've had middling czernina before (some restaurants add ground liver to get away with using less duck's blood) but never as bad as this.

If a visitor had it for the first time at that restaurant, they'd be put off it.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
21 May 2017 #70
never a hit

Have we mentioned salceson, simialr to brawn or American headcheese? It's like galareta (zimne nogi) but contains more meat and offal and less gealtin encasement. At delis it gets machine-sliced so it's more of a cold cut than a classic aspic. Do you regard it as a delicacy or turn-off?
jon357 67 | 16,655
21 May 2017 #71
That exists in one way or another in many places, Po. One of those things that tastes ok providing you don't think too much about what's in it.

Calling it 'head cheese' isn't likely to attract many takers. Brawn will do.
mafketis 25 | 9,316
21 May 2017 #72
alceson, simialr to brawn or American headcheese?

I knew headcheese form the states (along with souse, headcheese made with vinegar, and pickeld pigs feet) so those weren't too unusual.

Does anywhere in Poland make anything like utopenec (pl utopenci) which are pickled bratwurst? Quite tasty when done well but I've never seen anything like it in Poland.... (pyzy from wielkopolska are very similar to Czech knedliky).
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
21 May 2017 #73
head cheese

That's how it's generally known in Americanese. And rightly do, because it mostly contains cut-up morsels of cooked head meat: snout, cheeks, jowls, ears, lips and tongue. (The "cheese" part is similar in word-formation custom to apple butter which contains no butter.) Brawn in common US parlance refers only to a man's (maybe some feminists'?) physical robustness, beefiness, etc. Sometimes contrasted as in "all brawn and no brains". Funny thing, today's yuck generation are turned off by many of the foods discussed here but scarf down hot dogs as if they were going out of style with no thought of what goes into them.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
21 May 2017 #74
And rightly do

TYPO -- should read: And rightly so.
Chemikiem
22 May 2017 #75
What about kaszanka, Blutwurst, boudin, black pudding, etc. Don't they all contain blood?

They do, and I wouldn't touch any of them.

it mostly contains cut-up morsels of cooked head meat: snout, cheeks, jowls, ears, lips and tongue.

Vile. I had brawn as a child and it was disgusting. Never heard it referred to as head cheese though.
jon357 67 | 16,655
22 May 2017 #76
"all brawn and no brains"

People say similar things in Britain.

Vile. I had brawn as a child and it was disgusting

Horrible, isn't it. Better to use that part of the pig for pet food.

I was at a buffet here a while ago where there were chicken hearts wrapped in boczek and chicken stomachs. Not very nice at all and offputting to many. No real need to eat that stuff nowadays.
Chemikiem
22 May 2017 #77
chicken hearts wrapped in boczek and chicken stomachs

That sounds horrible :-( Can't imagine why anyone would want to serve those at a buffet, not exactly appetising.

No real need to eat that stuff nowadays.

Harks back to when food was in short supply and people had to make do with what they had. Same as in the UK. I doubt anyone would buy tripe these days unless it was for a pet, but commonly eaten at one time. Still very popular in Poland though. I don't think brawn is too popular in the UK these days either, haven't seen it for years now.
jon357 67 | 16,655
22 May 2017 #78
Pig's liver too. Lamb's liver is great, as is cow's liver when it's cooked nicely. Chicken liver is a classic (as long as it isn't over cooked and crispy as it often is here) Pig's liver is more a pet food thing, however I've seen it served here a few times.
Chemikiem
23 May 2017 #79
Chicken liver is a classic

I've never tried it as a dish, only in pate when Polish friends have made it. Can't say I'm overfond of internal organs at all tbh! I would eat lamb's liver if it was offered and cooked properly, not half cremated, but I wouldn't order it in a restaurant. Far nicer dishes than offal based ones!
Wincig 2 | 220
11 Sep 2019 #80
That's how it's generally known in Americanese

Not only in America, it is called fromage de tête in France

chicken stomachs. Not very nice at all and offputting to many. No real need to eat that stuff nowadays.

What about haggis?? And anyway eating is about pleasure not need, at least for most people in developed countries

What about kaszanka, Blutwurst, boudin, black pudding, etc.

Love it! One of my favourite treats is speading marrow from the bone on a toast with a sprinkle of salt.
Miloslaw 9 | 2,922
11 Sep 2019 #81
Not only in America, it is called fromage de tête in France

And Brawn in England :-)

I too like many of these offal based dishes,Polish Salceson and Galareta and French Andouille too.

My Mum used to make Galareta from a whole pigs head, seasoned with salt, pepper and vinegar and served with some good quality bread it was a meal on it's own.
pawian 178 | 15,517
4 Jan 2021 #82
Just the thought makes my stomach heave.

You will change your mind if you know that king Jagiełło, the one who defeated Teutonic Knights at Grunwald in 1410 and who Poles are so proud of, was an enthusiastic fan of tripe dish.

It is interesting to know that those little strips in the tripe dish are cut out of large sheets of bowine stomach which consists of several parts.

So, when will you try this royal dish?





Dave Peter Polski
5 Jan 2021 #83
All of it. It's rubbish. The only thing worse is British food!
pawian 178 | 15,517
5 Jan 2021 #84
All of it. It's rubbish

You say so coz you are too cowardly to try soup designed for real macho males - black soup! With duck blood in it! Ha!



jon357 67 | 16,655
5 Jan 2021 #85
black soup! With duck blood in it!

Delicious if it's the real thing. In some places that sell it, it's mostly liver though.
pawian 178 | 15,517
5 Jan 2021 #86
it's mostly liver though.

Then it`s mock duck blood soup. Bloody forgers.
jon357 67 | 16,655
5 Jan 2021 #87
That's what I felt when I last had one like that. The place advertised it as a speciality too.

It's fine to use a bit of liver, however this was just liver soup; it hadn't sen even a corpuscle of duck's blood.

No dried fruit in it either...
Chemikiem
6 Jan 2021 #88
when will you try this royal dish?

Now you know that I loathe flaki, so trying to sell it to me from a royalty angle isn't going to work I'm afraid!

black soup! With duck blood

Czernina I think. Looks nice, I would like to try it. Might be hard to find the real thing though if it's often substituted with liver.
Zlatko
6 Jan 2021 #89
I don't know if Poles have that but I'd hate some kinds of aged smelly fish. Also, red barszcz is boring, mostly veggies and wated and I get hungry after a while. Gimme a thickened white version with some nice kielbasa instead! ;)

@Dave Peter.Polski
bs British food is better than Dutch and Polish is better than both and also better than German and Austrian one. Makowiec (sp?) looks lovely. I bet in the beautiful South of Poland they have some nice cheeses.
gumishu 11 | 5,681
7 Jan 2021 #90
Gimme a thickened white version with some nice kielbasa instead! ;)

many people put kielbasa (and/or a chunk of bacon) into barszcz - my mom used to do it often


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