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Posts by Polonius3  

Joined: 11 Apr 2008 / Male ♂
Warnings: 2 - QQ
Last Post: 9 Apr 2018
Threads: Total: 983 / In This Archive: 289
Posts: Total: 12,333 / In This Archive: 906
From: US Sterling Heigths, MI
Speaks Polish?: yes
Interests: Polish history, genealogy

Displayed posts: 1195 / page 2 of 40
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Polonius3   
6 Nov 2009
USA, Canada / Polish and Ukrainian image in Canada? [4]

It has sometimes been said that the reason for 'Pollack' jokes in the US was because Poles were accoutend for the largest group of immigrants from backward East Europe. In Canada however that biggest group are Ukrainians. My question in what is the prevalent image of and general Canadian attitudes towards Poles and Ukrainians? Are they the same of do they differ? Was there ever a wave of Ukie jokes similar to US Pollack jokes which were actualy re-makes of moron jokes?
Polonius3   
6 Nov 2009
Genealogy / What nationality is Slavic? [23]

Hey Guys -- Mea maxima culpa. It was a slip of the finger. what I had heard was: "He's Jewish (not Polish Jewish) but his wife is Slavisch." Sorry for the confusion. The word 'Polish' did not enter the picture.
Polonius3   
6 Nov 2009
Food / Favorite Pierogi? [56]

What happened to savory cheese pieorgi in Poland? In Hamtramck that was the only kind of just cheese pierogi our little ol' babcias (God rest theri soul!) used to make. There were of course cheese & potato versions (known as ruskie in Poland). But in Poland if you ask for pieiogi z serem you get this God-awful, sickening-sweet cheese filling usually 'overperfumed' with synthetic vanilla flavouring (vanillin or wanilina in Polish).

The cheese pierogi I like are flavoured with only a touch a lemon juice, salt and perhaps only one teasspoon of sugar to break the blandness.

Personally, I find the vanillin-flavoured type to be quite a turn-off, but.....à chacun son goût!
Polonius3   
6 Nov 2009
Food / Kołacz - POLISH CHEESE/WHEEL CAKE [12]

Kołacz - Polish wheel cake

Long before the mutli-tiered wedding cake made the scene in Poland, there was the kołacz weselny, a round yeast-raised cake or bread usually with a sweet cheese filling in its central indentation.

Here is some info for those interested:

easteuropeanfood.about.com/od/polishdesserts/r/cheesekolacz2.htm
Polonius3   
6 Nov 2009
Genealogy / What nationality is Slavic? [23]

I kind of suspected that, but if the wife were just Russian or just Czech, would Slavic still be used, or does it apply only to Polish nationality?
Polonius3   
6 Nov 2009
Genealogy / What nationality is Slavic? [23]

Before someone starts enumerating East SLavs, West Slavs and South Slavs...let me explain what I meant. Over the years I haev occasioanlly heard things like "He's Jewish Polish but his wife is Slavic." Or (presumably a German or Yiddish version) "Slavisch". It was usually in passing or when I didn't feel like delving into it, so I still don't know what that means. Slovak, Slovenian or what? Has any of you heard the term Slavic in reference to a specific ethnic group rather than a whole Slavonic ethno-linguistic family? Incidentally, I have heard this only from people from NY, so maybe it's a NY thing.

A PF-er nicknamed Krystal recently mentioned his ethnic roots included (sic!) Slovina. Maybe he meant Slovenian?
Polonius3   
6 Nov 2009
Life / Polish background music for presentation [3]

Chopin is indeed the best single choice. For multiple choices, also consider Moniuszko. There is a good all-instrumental album, a cross-section of the best-known Polish light classical and traditonal music called Echa Ojczyzny (Echoes of the Homeland). Dunno it it's still available.
Polonius3   
5 Nov 2009
Food / Sour cream use in Pierogi dough? [11]

Yes, this makes the tenderest pierogi dough known: 2 cups flour, 1 cup sour cream and 1 small egg. That's all there's to it! Also 1/2 teaspoon of salt.
Polonius3   
4 Nov 2009
Food / Zaplaska (?) soup [6]

Maybe that is how you heard zaprażka said. In some dialects that is the word for roux (simmered fat & flour soup thickener).
Polonius3   
4 Nov 2009
Genealogy / surname Czworka [8]

I'm a US-born 100% Polish American with four Polish-born grandparents who came from the Konin (paternal) and Lublin (maternal) areas. I was raised in the once predominantly Polish enclave-suburb (you had to drive through some part of Detroit to leave it!) of Hamtramck, Michigan -- home of Kowalski Sausage Co., Dodge Main and Chevrolet Gear & Axle. I have lived in Wisconsin and Michigan, travelled to Poland many times and spent a few years in Warsaw. I am interested in onomastics (name research) and most every other aspect of Polish and Polonian history, sociology, language, cuisine, ethnography, etc.
Polonius3   
4 Nov 2009
Genealogy / surname Czworka [8]

Only 3 people in Poland named Cwórka and they live in £ódź or vicinity (presumably one family). The name means quartet or foursome.
Polonius3   
4 Nov 2009
Genealogy / Father born in Wieruszow - Amrozynska, Knop [6]

Most Every name, from Margolis, Szapiro, Blumental, Lubartower, Gryn, Wajs, Apfel, Szwarc, Rosenzweig, Birnbaum or Birnbojm (Yiddish) to Nowak, Kowalski, Lewandowski, Wójcik, Zieliński, Szymański and Antonowicz can be a Jewish name.
Polonius3   
4 Nov 2009
Food / Czernina not with chicken blood?! [3]

In my family czernina has been traditionally made only with duck or goose blood -- both very good. However, I have heard that in a pinch pork or rabbit blood may be used, but NEVER chicken blood! I have always wondered why, but never decided to actually try it. Why spoil a whole pot of soup just to prove a point, eh?!
Polonius3   
4 Nov 2009
Food / Which brand of sauerkraut do you prefer? [10]

The acidity of sauerkraut available in the US varies considerbaly. The highly popular Silver Floss brand is quite sour and needs tro be rinsed. Some of the Polish brands eg Krakus can be used straight from the jar after draining (without rinsing). Aniotehr popular brand in michigna is Vlasic sauerkraut. There are also many own brands of supermarket chains and different ways of packing it: jar, tin, plastic bag or straight from the barrel at some Old World style markets in big cities.

Do you think some of the companies cheat by adding vinegar to their kraut which is much quicker than slowly brine-curing it?
So which brand of sauerkraut do you prefer and why?
Polonius3   
3 Nov 2009
Language / Polish vs. Romanian [21]

Since most everyone knows the Lord's Prayer, it is a good way to compare different langauges. The Romanian is interesting in that one can detect elements of different languages. Instead of some Latin sanct- root for 'hallowed (be Thy name)', we have a word defintiely borrowed from Slavdom: sfinţească-se. 'greşelile' is clearly taken from 'grzech' or its Russo-Bulgarian equivalent. And, I may be wrong, but in 'For thine is the power...' we have 'Că a Ta' which reminds me of French 'car a Toi...'

If I only knew how to pronounce this text! I wonder if someone might care to phonetically transcribe it into Polish?

Tatăl nostru care eşti în ceruri,
sfinţească-se numele Tău,
vie împărăţia Ta,
facă-se voia Ta, precum în cer aşa şi pe pământ.
Pâinea noastră cea de toate zilele
dă-ne-o nouă astăzi
şi ne iartă nouă greşelile noastre
precum şi noi iertăm greşiţilor noştri.
Şi nu ne duce pe noi în ispită,
ci ne izbǎveşte de cel rău.
[Că a Ta este împărăţia şi puterea şi mărirea,
acum şi pururea şi în vecii vecilor. Amin.
Polonius3   
3 Nov 2009
Genealogy / Father born in Wieruszow - Amrozynska, Knop [6]

Knop was probably originally derived from German "Knopf" (button, knob, pommel of a sword, etc.) The original Knopf may have been a button-maker or seller or hailed from some such locality as Knopfendorf, Knopfenwald, Knopfenfeld, etc.
Polonius3   
3 Nov 2009
Genealogy / Antoni Uszylo - surname and place [6]

You can also contact the Koszalin district authorities and ask them for the Dział Ewidencji Ludności (population records dept):
Województwo: Zachodniopomorskie
Powiat: Powiat m. Koszalin
Gmina: M. Koszalin
Poczta: Koszalin
telefon: 0-94 342-27-11
faks: 0-94 346-22-61
Adres e-mail
poczta@powiat.koszalin.pl

Tell them you are searching for long-lost relations and ask them if there are any Uszyłos on record and, if so, could they provide you with soem addresses.

You may run into the privacy-protection nonsense that oppresses us these days at every turn of the way. Naturally, yo'll have to to all this in Polish. If not fluent in the lingo, find someone who is.

Good luck!
Polonius3   
3 Nov 2009
Language / Jennifer - will people be able to pronounce it properly? [11]

Jennifer is nothing mroe than one of the English equivalents of Genowefa. And the short form of that in Polish is Gienia - something every Pole can pronounce.

Genevieve also exists in English. The origin of this dithematic first name was Geno (a Roman clan) and the Germanic wifa (woman, wife).
Polonius3   
3 Nov 2009
Food / Recipes for a Polish dish [9]

Suggestions for some dishes like babcia used to make:

zrazy wołowe zawijane z kaszą gryczaną i buraczkami
(Beef roll-ups with buckwheat groats and braised beetroot.)

kurczak nadziewnay po polsku z kartofelkami i mizerią
(roast chikcen with dill-flavoured bread, liver & meat stuffing with boiledpotatoes and sliced cucumbers with sour cream.)

kotlet schabowy z tłuczonymi kartoflami i kapustą duszoną
(pounded, breaded pork cutlet with mashed potatoes and stewed cabbage or sauerkraut.)

For dessert: a big (non-grandmotherly) kiss!
Polonius3   
3 Nov 2009
Genealogy / Antoni Uszylo - surname and place [6]

There are only 14 people in Poland sharing the Uszyło surname, and all of them live in the Koszalin region (formerly German Köslin). That suggests that they are all memebrs of the same family and that after the war they were amongst the Polish repatriates transplanted from the one-half of pre-war Poland annexed by Stalin and never returned. The name itself is one of many verb-derived surnames which include Przybył, Biegała, Świtało, etc. Its root is the verb "szyć" (to sew) and l literally means "it has sewn".

Could the locality you mentioned be today's Bertuliai (in Lithuanian) which is now in Lithuania?
Polonius3   
2 Nov 2009
Language / Pronouncing final -ą as -oł (Czech infleunce?) [14]

But the ą in łące is not nasal but a plain on (łonce) sound. Correct me if I'm wrong, but the only true remaining nasal in Polish is the final -ą.
Polonius3   
2 Nov 2009
Language / "Mieć doła" - moron speech? [6]

Why would anyone in their right mind say "mam doła"?! Dół is masc. inanimate so nominative = accusative. Only an uneducated retard would say things like "Felek, daj młotka", and the "doła" business sounds about the same.

Besides isn't the expression "być w dołku" (to feel depressed) in the first place?
Polonius3   
2 Nov 2009
Life / BEING POLISH MEANS....? [18]

Being Polish means loving, respecting and protecting the three things Poles have traditonally cherished: God, homeland and family. It means the knightly ethos of helping those in need as well as overflowing hosptiality extended to all and sundry. It means idealism and romanticism in the Mickiewiczian (rather than the Harlequin romance) sense of the term. Do all Poles fit the bill? Of course not, but as in archery, you have to aim above the mark to hit your target.
Polonius3   
1 Nov 2009
Language / Pronouncing final -ą as -oł (Czech infleunce?) [14]

Well, isn't the first syllable stress in Góral speech not influenced by Czech and Slovak? As in 'My ZObocyli' (upper case indicates stress), uon dobry POcynstunek PRZYgotowoł...etc.
Polonius3   
1 Nov 2009
Life / Why is Polka music played in Poland so much different than in the USA? [36]

Surpisingly most Poles in Poland do not realise that the polka music industry is quite big in America.The Polish polka alone (as it is called) is divded into the Chicago and the east coast sound, and there are also Slovenian, Slovak, Czech, German, Lithuanian and (esp. in Canada) Ukrainian polkas. Included in the notion of polka music are also obereks and waltzes. There are polka music programmes on radio stations across america. And even snooty Poles (liek the disco/polo/bashers!!) from Poland agree (after the 5th or 6th round of drinks) that polkas are an integral part of the fun festivites at a traditonal Pol-Am wedding.

Incidentally, a polka category was introduced into the Grammy Awards a few years ago. One of the best-known and, I believe, Grammy-awarded polka musicians is an Irish American whose name at the moment escapes me. Maybe someone on PF knows.

For those seeking additional enlightenment:
pbs.org/riverofsong/music/e1-polka.html