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What nationality is Slavic?


Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448  
6 Nov 2009 /  #1
Before someone starts enumerating East SLavs, West Slavs and South Slavs...let me explain what I meant. Over the years I haev occasioanlly heard things like "He's Jewish Polish but his wife is Slavic." Or (presumably a German or Yiddish version) "Slavisch". It was usually in passing or when I didn't feel like delving into it, so I still don't know what that means. Slovak, Slovenian or what? Has any of you heard the term Slavic in reference to a specific ethnic group rather than a whole Slavonic ethno-linguistic family? Incidentally, I have heard this only from people from NY, so maybe it's a NY thing.

A PF-er nicknamed Krystal recently mentioned his ethnic roots included (sic!) Slovina. Maybe he meant Slovenian?
Polson 5 | 1,771  
6 Nov 2009 /  #2
He's Jewish Polish but his wife is Slavic

Maybe Slavic in opposition to Jewish, as an ethnic group.
So you should read this: He's Jewish Polish but his wife is (just) Polish ;)
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448  
6 Nov 2009 /  #3
I kind of suspected that, but if the wife were just Russian or just Czech, would Slavic still be used, or does it apply only to Polish nationality?
southern 75 | 7,096  
6 Nov 2009 /  #4
All Poles are Slavs.Not every Slav is a Pole.This is the answer.
Bratwurst Boy 6 | 10,527  
6 Nov 2009 /  #5
All Poles are Slavs....

65% Max
mafketis 23 | 8,136  
6 Nov 2009 /  #6
"He's Jewish Polish but his wife is Slavic."

I've never heard this before, but I would assume that the pattern goes.

"He's Jewish Polish but his wife is Slavic." (means, she's Polish)

"He's Jewish Polish but his wife is Czech."

"He's Jewish Russian but his wife is Slavic." (she's Russian)*

"He's Jewish Polish but his wife is Polish."

*conceivably Ukrainian or Belarussian (which with Russian make up the three Soviet slavic groups) but not Polish or Slovak or Croatian

That is, Slavic hear is a shorthand way of referring back to the previously mentioned Slavic group.

On the other hand, I find that absent any open religious differences, the distinction between Jews and Slavs (and endless pointless arguments about who is and isn't Jewish) to be about as entertaining as scraping my teeth against the sidewalk....
MareGaea 29 | 2,752  
6 Nov 2009 /  #7
"He's Jewish Polish but his wife is Slavic."

Translation: He is a Pole of the Jewish faith and she is a Pole of the Catholic faith.

Easy peasy.

mafketis

What is generally called a "Jew" is a Pole who adheres to the Jewish faith. But still he is a Pole. And nothing but a Pole. The Jewish minority in PL has lived there for about 1000 years, they should be called Poles, just like every other person born and bred there.

>^..^<

M-G (life can be so simple sometimes)
mafketis 23 | 8,136  
6 Nov 2009 /  #8
Mare Gaea,

I agree, but there's also a significant (and tiresome) minority in Poland (and Polish communities abroad) that spends a lot of time saying, for example, that "X is a Jew!" (meaning a person who's entirely Polish in language and upbringing, and maybe even a practicing Catholic) has some Jewish ancestory.
Piorun - | 658  
6 Nov 2009 /  #9
Easy peasy.

This has to be Jewish logic; most of Slavs are in fact not of the Catholic faith. Are you telling me that when you say Slavic you mean Polish but you just can’t bring yourself to say Polish because of your hate for Poland and all that’s Polish? Make it simple and say it like we do (ona Polka, on Żyd.)

Easy peasy.
MareGaea 29 | 2,752  
6 Nov 2009 /  #10
Piorun

Are you saying that somebody who is born and raised in Poland and lived there all his life is not a Pole? Because that was what this was all about. My supposed "hate" for PL is just something you make of it. And, I believe that the vast majority of Poles are in fact Catholic. And since the example was about Poles, I just took the example. But to say "he is a Pole or any other nationality of the Jewish faith and she is a Pole or any other nationality of the non-Jewish faith" would be a bit ridiculous now, wouldn't it? That would be a Jewish statement.

Again, trying to flame me has no use, I don't give a sh*t if you try to do that. And that I hate Poles, well, that's all in your head.

>^..^<

M-G (très facile)
Piorun - | 658  
6 Nov 2009 /  #11
Again, trying to flame me has no use, I don't give a sh*t if you try to do that. And that I hate Poles, well, that's all in your head.

Relax will you, it’s your people that make that distinction emphasizing Jewish whenever possible. Besides didn’t you argue that Jewish is used only for the religion, if so there’s no need to substitute Polish for Slavic when describing a wife of a Jew who is a Catholic Pole, after all to most foreigners Polish = Catholic, where Slavic dose not.
MareGaea 29 | 2,752  
6 Nov 2009 /  #12
Piorun

Oh I am totally relaxed, in fact I look forward to my Friday afternoon pint :)

>^..^<

M-G (in my country Jews are just Dutch ppl who adhere to the Jewish faith)
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448  
6 Nov 2009 /  #13
Hey Guys -- Mea maxima culpa. It was a slip of the finger. what I had heard was: "He's Jewish (not Polish Jewish) but his wife is Slavisch." Sorry for the confusion. The word 'Polish' did not enter the picture.
MareGaea 29 | 2,752  
6 Nov 2009 /  #14
Polonius3

Does he come from Israël originally? And she from a Slavic country?

mafketis

I noticed that. But I know that most Polish ppl are decent ppl that don't make a difference. I already told that story about my Polish friend's grandmother who pinpointed out Jews when they came on tv and so on...

>^..^<

M-G (curious)
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448  
6 Nov 2009 /  #15
As far as I know, all were US-born.
MareGaea 29 | 2,752  
7 Nov 2009 /  #16
Then they are all Americans. The rest is just rubbish. American rubbish. If you're born in the US, you're American, not Polish, not Jewish, just American.

The only feasible explanation there is would be: he is of Jewish descent, she is of Slavic descent. There is nothing more to add, that's just it.

>^..^<

M-G (tiens)
Mr Grunwald 19 | 1,542  
7 Nov 2009 /  #17
Are you saying that somebody who is born and raised in Poland and lived there all his life is not a Pole? Because that was what this was all about. My supposed "hate" for PL is just something you make of it. And, I believe that the vast majority of Poles are in fact Catholic. And since the example was about Poles, I just took the example. But to say "he is a Pole or any other nationality of the Jewish faith and she is a Pole or any other nationality of the non-Jewish faith" would be a bit ridiculous now, wouldn't it? That would be a Jewish statement.

Again, trying to flame me has no use, I don't give a sh*t if you try to do that. And that I hate Poles, well, that's all in your head.

There are many ideas of nationality and citizenship. Poland has allmost allways been a multicultural sociaty. That is why it has allways been important to separate one from each other so that you yourself know WHO YOU ARE. One goes more to the genes other more of the faith or of ideas, other just don't care. I for instance care for the faith and values, others may seem to think different.

So for me a Polish Jew = Polish beliving in the religion called Judaeism. Not one with Jewish ancestry unless he himself says it. Others saying it won't make me 100% sure on that person. While a German for instance is a different matter since they very clearly focus on the genes & language. If I knew perfect German most Germans (including BB^^) would assume I am German.

Wich I am not. Just German ancestry, nothing more.

And for the topic itself if he/she said the wife is slavic , for me it would been she had to be one of national connection to a Slavic linguilistic group, either Russian, Polish, Serbian, Croation or even Czech. It's just that this person don't really see any difference between slavic groups and puts them into one basket. Just like some people do with "Anglosaxons" or "Angole"

and I didn't notice "The word 'Polish' did not enter the picture." after third edit -.-
MareGaea 29 | 2,752  
7 Nov 2009 /  #18
Mr Grunwald

But that's what I have been saying all along. Polish was just mentioned as an example. This is a Polish forum, that's why ;)

I am Dutch, I consider myself Dutch. If I would be religious and would follow the Judaic laws of religious inheritence, I would have been a Dutch of the Judaic faith, however, I am first and foremost Dutch, you see?

>^..^<

M-G (good mooded and has arranged a marriage for Grunwald)
George8600 10 | 637  
8 Nov 2009 /  #19
What do you mean? By culture or genetics? By culture, Poles are themselves with their own culture and language, just like most slavic countries have their own. I have spoken to Ukrainians and Russians about Polish culture and they claim it to be very much different than their own.

As for genetics, not all Slavic nations have the same genetics, each one has a significant compose of it's own in haploids (genes used to determine ethnicity).

southern:
All Poles are Slavs....

65% Max

Bratwurst boy is very much correct here, almost all if not all genetic tests done on Polands ethnical haploids points out that two major haplogroups dominate Poland: The Slavic and Tartaric. It's around those numbers that Bratwurstboy mentioned.
Mr Grunwald 19 | 1,542  
8 Nov 2009 /  #20
good mooded and has arranged a marriage for Grunwald

I hope she is pretty ^^
Is she catholic? Or does she have anything against catholiscism atleast?
info!11234  
25 Nov 2009 /  #21
I'm pretty sure that almost all slavic people are the same whether it's western slavic (czech) or northern(polish), eastern(russian, ukrainian), or southern (yugoslavic[croats,serbs, bosnians]). slavics all originated as the same race, but made up different countries, but all the same people if you think about it.
Dice 15 | 452  
26 Nov 2009 /  #22
All Poles are Slavs.Not every Slav is a Pole.This is the answer.

Not exactly. There are German Poles, Jewish Poles, Dutch Poles, Prussian Poles, Mongolian Poles. Also, the Free City Of Gdansk Poles.

PS. There are also: electric poles, stripper poles, pre-election polls, marketing polls... :D

PS2. Also, there are Lithuanian Poles and Roma Poles (neither of them are Slavic).
osiol 55 | 3,922  
26 Nov 2009 /  #23
there are Lithuanian Poles and Roma Poles

Polish Lithuanians wouldn't be Slavic, but Lithuanian Poles would be. Roma Poles don't really exist, but Polish Romani do. It makes a different which word comes first.

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