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World War II - a tragic story for Poland and the World


Harry  
2 Jul 2009 /  #481
Just because he left the party later doesn't sbsolve him

But just because you were ready to drop bombs on Poland anytime your American paymasters told you to does make you a traitor.

I don't have to take anything up with wiki on this point because they correctly identify this camp as an internment camp.

An un-named, unpaid, unknown contributor to wikipedia calls BK an internment camp (according to you anyway: the page itself is titled "Bereza Kartuska prison", apparently even you know that calling it a prison won't fly). Well-known, big-name, well-paid professional historians such as Yale University professor Timothy Snyder, the Polish Nobel prize-winning author Czesław Miłosz, Ukrainian historians Kubijovych and Idzio, Polish-British historian Tadeusz Piotrowski and British historian Norman Davies call it a concentration camp. Who should be belive?!

Still waiting for you to name those 693 historians who who use “detention camp or prison”. Or shall we accept your silence as confirmation that you know you've been caught lying yet again?
sjam 2 | 541  
2 Jul 2009 /  #482
I wonder if Polish-American servicemen like 1jola really would have bombed Poland during the Cold War if ordered to by their commander-in-chief or would they have refused the order?

Guess my late father would have faced the same possibility whilst serving in the British Army, although he might have considered all Poles in Poland commies and hit the button, so to speak.
1jola 14 | 1876  
2 Jul 2009 /  #483
Guess my late father would have faced the same possibility whilst serving in the British Army, although he might have considered all Poles in Poland commies and hit the button, so to speak.

According to Harry, your father was a traitor. How do you feel about that?
sjam 2 | 541  
2 Jul 2009 /  #484
Who should be belive?!

A Noble Prize idiot :-)) Now who could that be?

According to Harry, your father was a traitor. How do you feel about that?

According to Harry that would be so and I understand why Harry would think so. But I don't personally think of my father as a traitor; although to the Warsaw government in 1945 he was, as were all those in the Polish Second Corps.

You said that you were a Polish-American serviceman therefore would you have bombed Poland during the Cold War if ordered to by your commander-in-chief or would you have refused the order for fear of killing any of your family in Poland?
1jola 14 | 1876  
2 Jul 2009 /  #485
According to Harry that would be so and I understand why Harry would think so. But I don't personally think of my father as a traitor;

Explain it to your dimwit friend then.

therefore would you have bombed Poland

I doubt I want to talk to you about what I did in the service.
sjam 2 | 541  
2 Jul 2009 /  #486
I doubt I want to talk to you about what I did in the service.

No doubt, but I am not asking what you did in the service but what would you have done given:

As a Polish-American servicemen would you have bombed Poland during the Cold War if ordered to by the President and thus potentially kill members of your own family?

At times during the cold war this was a very real possibilty so you must have thought about it? No?

Maybe there are other former Polish-American servicemen on this forum who might have been faced with the same order... so lets open it out.
1jola 14 | 1876  
2 Jul 2009 /  #487
This type of question was discussed within American forces as there were many soldiers facing such dilemma. That's why we have security clearances so we don't yak about it publicly, and especially with people like Harry.

Interesting discussion, but this is not the place.

Harry thinks that he can insult me over and over, and I will not react. Stupidity of some people amazes.

chose to fight for a foreign power.

Sjams father chose to fight for a foreign power also. In your twisted mind that makes him a traitor.
sjam 2 | 541  
2 Jul 2009 /  #488
That's why we have security clearances so we don't yak about it publicly,

I think you are using this joke excuse to evade answering rather than anything else; the Cold War ended more than twenty years ago; and I am asking for your personal opinion about an issue which you must have thought about before enlisting or during service in the Cold War?

Do you think the Polish forces of the Warsaw Pact would have opened fire on Polish-Americans if they were identifiable?

Sjams father chose to fight for a foreign power also.

I can confirm that he did and he did it well :-)) Having been decorated for killing communist insurgents in Kuwait, Yemen and Oman... oh... and Malaya ;-))

At the time my father was considered a traitor to Poland by the communist Warsaw government in 1945 for having sworn allegiance to the Polish-government-in-exile that was based in London. That was the position of the Warsaw government with Gen. Anders also.

Some posts have been removed from this thread, because they have included personal attacks on other members. A reminder to keep on topic and no insults to other members please.
Harry  
2 Jul 2009 /  #489
Back on topic, 1jola please provide the names of the 693 historians who who use “detention camp or prison”. You claim that 99.9% of historians use that phrase. I have named seven who use the phrase "concentration camp", you should have no problem naming your 99.9% of historians.

If you would like to name the 693 historians in person, I've mentioned before where I'll be this Saturday. Do feel free to drop by.

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