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Comparing Educational Standards in Poland vs other countries


ArturSzastak 3 | 593  
8 Mar 2007 /  #61
Wish they taught it in the US. I can't imagine a person from the UK not being taught about the most famous Englishman to ever live.
Annia  
8 Mar 2007 /  #62
Its wonderful, I love it and never tire of reading going to watch his plays.
ArturSzastak 3 | 593  
8 Mar 2007 /  #63
I was Hamlet in the play at our school. Can you picture me in tights with a swashbuckler's sword? I do like to act to an extent. And it was rather fun seeing as I had to make an "old British" accent. :)
sapphire 22 | 1,241  
9 Mar 2007 /  #64
Miles out. Average student debt was £14K

education.guardian.co.uk/students/finance/story/0,,1845017,00.html

Doesn't anybody know how to use Google anymore. I don't know.

You clearly have too much time on your hands... or you are a statistic freak.
OP szarlotka 8 | 2,208  
9 Mar 2007 /  #65
Can anyone tell me roughly the cost of obtaining a degree in Poland (say he desparately trying to convince Admin that this thread is still on track)
hello 22 | 891  
9 Mar 2007 /  #66
the cost of obtaining a degree in Poland

If you are a good student, you won't have to pay anything (daily studies; not part-time).
OP szarlotka 8 | 2,208  
9 Mar 2007 /  #67
So it is free if you are good enough (bit like getting a scholarship in UK or US?). What about if you are not one of the top students?
Member 223  
9 Mar 2007 /  #68
What about if you are not one of the top students?

Still free
hello 22 | 891  
9 Mar 2007 /  #69
Basically good students study "daily and full-time". But in order to do that you have to have money for rent, food, books, etc. So daily studens of public universities don't pay tuition, but have to cover accomodation and living costs. Students of evening classes or part-time students have to pay quite a lot of money to get a degree.
WolfHound  
13 Mar 2007 /  #70
According to my international politics book. Poland's edcuation system is ranked slightly lower then the United States education system. And sadly the United States educations system is ranked as average. So Poland's education system is slightly below average.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,384  
13 Mar 2007 /  #71
WolfHound,

I imagine your book is out of print and out of date.
BubbaWoo 33 | 3,510  
13 Mar 2007 /  #72
it would be nice to have the book referenced
Annia  
13 Mar 2007 /  #73
It makes sense to me, since people in the states have to pay for their education I would imagine they work hard in order to get a return on it and are more likely to take subjects that will earn them a living e.g., doctors, lawers etc and not psychology which I am told is popular in Poland. IMHO.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,384  
13 Mar 2007 /  #74
Annia,

If you don't pass the annual exams you still get kicked out. Young people here are motivated enough to take extra lessons and pay for weekend courses.

In Wroclaw the main subjects are: medicine, law, economy and IT.
muzyka  
14 Mar 2007 /  #75
I have to disagree that Maths is a benchmark degree. Its to specialised.

Just correcting your English....many of you make this error : it should read "it's TOO specialised" the double "OO" gives the emphasis of excess, the other spelling TO means going to the movies, to the races, writing to my friend etc. etc.

happy to provide this FREE english editing service for you all :) :) :)
King Sobieski 2 | 716  
14 Mar 2007 /  #76
careful, i made mention of someones grammar and spelling and received the wrath for it.
muzyka  
14 Mar 2007 /  #77
wow, that is sad.
But, I've offered before (and was welcomed by others) to help improve english language skills....so I took a chance.....
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,161  
14 Mar 2007 /  #78
According to my international politics book. Poland's edcuation system is ranked slightly lower then the United States education system. And sadly the United States educations system is ranked as average. So Poland's education system is slightly below average.

Maybe, but I really doubt that...

and not psychology which I am told is popular in Poland.

Psychology gives a really good money here.
miranda  
14 Mar 2007 /  #79
Muzyka,
you can correct me anytine.
WolfHound  
14 Mar 2007 /  #80
WolfHound,

I imagine your book is out of print and out of date.

Nope the latest edition is for 2007. But I think its not the best since it also says Poland is a relatively poor country. Its a figure that shows the comparative achievement in mathematics, science, and reading. According to the 2004 statistics Poland has a achievement rank of 432. Average is 500. But that was 3 years ago. I'm sure the education system has gotten better in the last 3 years.
Varsovian 92 | 634  
16 Mar 2007 /  #81
... and I make money from correcting people!
Good line of business.
ajgraham  
18 Mar 2007 /  #82
In Poland we always were thinkink that universities here are on so high level, and studying here is so complicated. Now many Polish ppl studying here, because some of them find it easier and they want to come back with english diploma believing it will be more appreciate than Polish one, so they prefer easier and better

The usual predictable rant....the higher education system in the UK is one of the best in the world, thats why its popular with students from around the world. I don't think many people would want to go to Poland for a Degree!
Matyjasz 2 | 1,544  
19 Mar 2007 /  #83
I don't think many people would want to go to Poland for a Degree!

That actually has more to do with the prestige of western countries (= prestige of western universities) rather then with educational level displayed by them, or by their eastern equivalents.

-edit-
Yes, I know I have troubles with "than" and "then" Bubba. :)
OP szarlotka 8 | 2,208  
19 Mar 2007 /  #84
I don't think many people would want to go to Poland for a Degree

That actually has more to do with the prestige of western countries (= prestige of western universities) rather then with educational level displayed by them, or by their eastern equivalents.

I agree with Matyjasz.

There is also the language problem when choosing a university in a non-English speaking country.
BubbaWoo 33 | 3,510  
19 Mar 2007 /  #85
Yes, I know I have troubles with "than" and "then" Bubba.

comments werent aimed at you matyjasz... just a general observation :)
Matyjasz 2 | 1,544  
19 Mar 2007 /  #86
I know. It's just that I have read your post regarding the misusing "than" and "then" just after I wrote that post. Quite a timing, innit? :)

There is also the language problem when choosing a university in a non-English speaking country.

Yeah, that would be another problem.
peterweg 37 | 2,319  
19 Mar 2007 /  #87
I agree with Matyjasz.

There is also the language problem when choosing a university in a non-English speaking country.

Agreed getting taught English at the same time as getting your degree is a definite advantage. In Sweden ALL teaching is in English from an early age.
Varsovian 92 | 634  
20 Mar 2007 /  #88
I'm a proofreader!
But I'm not going to do it for free on the internet and have to double-check my own work for mistakes as well - just to avoid cheap quips at my expense.

Education, hmm.
I received a very good education at a private school in England, went to university and ended up as a French teacher in a state school.

It was a disaster zone created by the system and everybody either had to accept it or get out - teachers and students alike. However, statistically the place is a success thanks to the counting of courses called GNVQs - but I'm not going into that (too boring). I just wanted to start off by saying that educational statistics can be meaningless.

A very straightforward example of how the French verb content of the public exams at 16 has changed:

pre-1984 post-1984
present tense of a wide variety of verbs pres. tense, selected verbs
future, wide variety future, 2 or 3 verbs
imperfect, wide variety imperfect, 2 or 3 vbs
perfect tense, wide variety perfect, selected verbs
pluperfect, wide variety (simple after perfect tense) no pluperfect
conditional, wide variety conditional, 2 or 3 vbs
present subjunctive, 3 or 4 verbs no subjunctive

The result of this lack of knowledge is that children aged 16 are totally lacking the skills required to operate in French.
Now, this is not a defence of the old system - it did have serious faults - but the new system is 10 times worse and children end up utterly disillusioned.

Fortunately for my children, the new generation growing up with them at school in Poland is being taught with useless British methods and my kids will always have jobs correcting Poles with their English!

On the whole, the recent Polish education reforms are a massive step backwards and most people on this forum are probably unaware of them unless they have children of school age.

The pre-1984 and post-1984 comparison was swallowed up by the forum software - read it with imagination and you'll understand!

Try again

pre-1984 // post-1984
present tense of a wide variety of verbs //pres. tense, selected verbs
future, wide variety //future, 2 or 3 verbs
imperfect, wide variety // imperfect, 2 or 3 vbs
perfect tense, wide variety // perfect, selected verbs
pluperfect, wide variety (simple after perfect tense) // no pluperfect
conditional, wide variety // conditional, 2 or 3 vbs
present subjunctive, 3 or 4 verbs // no subjunctive

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