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Consider going back to Poland?


Rakky 9 | 217  
11 Dec 2009 /  #31
This is an interesting thread. Thanks.
My cousin is now in her 60s - she moved from Poland to US 14 years ago. She barely speaks any english, watches polish movies and ready polish newspapers. I don't think she's particularly enamored of the place. I suspect she drinks at home and regrets being here, but is not planning on returning. I wonder why? She's obviously not happy here. Maybe things were worse back home?

I've only been there once, and only for a week, but part of me considers that part of Poland home.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
11 Dec 2009 /  #32
You can always save up and come back, Davey. Poland hasn't introduced the 'no entrance for drunken Brits' stamp yet ;) ;)
bolek 6 | 330  
11 Dec 2009 /  #33
The rule of thumb when moving to a different country ( I don't mean does of no means seeking their fortunes abroad) is ensuring you standard of living is equal or better to what you have used to.

Secondly there must be something of particular interest in the place you are intending to relocate, this may be family, sporting or hobby.

Thirdly don't even thinking about it if you have close ties to family in particular your own children.

Fourthly remember home is where you were born, and not being there will haunt you till you die, unless you were born in some third world country.

Fifly the people in the place you intend to relocate will only be as friendly as you are to them.

Sixly If you yearn for a change and don't give it a chance, you will have regrets till you die.
TheOther 6 | 3,692  
11 Dec 2009 /  #34
bolek

Nice post, Bolek, although I cannot confirm this part for me personally:

and not being there will haunt you till you die

I think of home occasionally, but it's not that I long to be there all the time.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808  
12 Dec 2009 /  #35
I love Ireland and it is always there for me.
I don't feel I have to live there though.

When I was nine years old I was convinced I was going to die, still to this day I do not know why, as nobody I knew was dead.

So with this daunting information, I looked where most people look, to religion.
There were wars about this and that religion, I was in Ireland and I had just come back from Jerusalem.
There were many weird and wonderful religions, non of which everyone agreed upon. They just competed or carried on, with some words of wisdom and a whole load of other stuff that I still find unnecessary.

So I looked to philosophy and politics, again noone had the answer, nobody agreed.
It seemed like people hadn't figured it out yet (still seems like it).
So I thought to myself what do we know for sure or at least agree on.
We live this life, this one life, just once (other lives not included), so I decided I wanted to take a look around the planet before I die.

A good few years ago, I left Ireland for good, to return only for holidays.
I met plenty of people who left their native lands and it seemed that many were always living a second best life in their adopted country.

As they were comparing the negative contrasts of the new country to their native country.
It almost seemed to me that they were sabotaging their happiness and living in the shadow of where they wanted to be, so to negate all that I decided not go back.

This is the type of thing I can not explain well but if you knew me, you'd understand.

I also thought about being Irish and what that means and after how long would I still be able to call myself 'Irish' but then I remembered that there are more Irish people outside the country than in Ireland and that in fact by not living in Ireland, I am by definition, a typical Paddy :)

I came here to Poland about 8 years ago for two years and then I moved to another country and then to another, I am back in Poland about 2 years now.

What can I say, Poland has been good to me.
If I had been in a most of the other countries I have lived, I would be facing terrible loses due to the financial crises.

But it is much more than just the money, I have met and keep in contact with great people here and I really enjoy the mountains and wildlife (bet you would never have guessed by the nature of my threads :)

Do I get home sick? No but I will always visit.
Will I stay in Poland? No but I will always visit.
Will I go back to Ireland? No but I will always visit.

I don't know if any of this will make sense to any of you but there you go anyway.
espana 17 | 932  
12 Dec 2009 /  #36
SeanBM
thank you for sharing ,,,,,,,anybody else drinking vodka ?
:)
derek trotter 10 | 203  
12 Dec 2009 /  #37
I have to say that my adopted country treated me not too well, maybe because this is NI ( probably not the best choice for foreigners ), dont really know. Finally after 5 years I am heading home in Dec, so wish me luck.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
12 Dec 2009 /  #38
NI is officially one of the most racist countries out there, trotter. You chose badly! Plus, the football didn't help.

As long as Poles don't romanticise their country too much, life is hard here for many.
krysia 23 | 3,058  
12 Dec 2009 /  #39
I miss Poland terribly. I even miss the dirty winter streets, with mud from under the buses spraying on my coat. It's that bad.

Then go back. Why you sitting in UK?
derek trotter 10 | 203  
12 Dec 2009 /  #40
Seanus
I ve been doing some research here as a socio logist freak, even decided to be arrested (for fun/experience ) to see how they treat foreigners/EE migrants. You couldn't believe what happened to me.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
12 Dec 2009 /  #41
I could. I know what they are like. Spill the beans!
derek trotter 10 | 203  
12 Dec 2009 /  #42
have you ever been treated like second-class citizen?
SeanBM 35 | 5,808  
12 Dec 2009 /  #43
Ah come on, we want all the gory details :)
Start at the beginning, what did you get arrested for?

And best of luck on your return to Poland.
bolek 6 | 330  
12 Dec 2009 /  #44
thank you for sharing ,,,,,,,anybody else drinking vodka ?

Cheers old boy, your a good man, love Poland as Poland loves your..
scrappleton - | 829  
12 Dec 2009 /  #45
NI is bad enough for people living there let alone an immigrant .. sorry for your troubles.
derek trotter 10 | 203  
12 Dec 2009 /  #46
sorry Sean, I dont want go to details here, that was interesting experience for me and thats it
SeanBM 35 | 5,808  
12 Dec 2009 /  #47
Okay.
I had to ask.
KLove 1 | 8  
12 Dec 2009 /  #48
Im moving to Poland with the wife next summer... she is from Silesia... Im as American as they come, no Polish roots whatsoever. Ive been there a maybe 5 or 6 times and thoroughly enjoyed it...

I dont hate where Im from, I love my friends and family, and always will... they've all had mixed reactions about my decision to move there, some supportive... and some think Im crazy or being manipulated by my wife...

So Ive had to ask my self this question lately... what is 'home'? Cheesy sayings like "home is where the heart is" come to mind.. but really I think 'home' is wherever one decides to make it.

To put it in the most convenient definitions for everyone... I said simply this - "I have an opportunity to have a different kind of life than I possibly could have here... and Im gonna take that opportunity. It might make me crazy or miserable or divorced... and its a whole lot easier said than done... but I think its easier done than regretted."

I hope so anyway...
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,161  
12 Dec 2009 /  #49
Stop thrusting your ideas too much and try to accommodate others. You are in the EU now so you have to be flexible and take the bad with the good.

LOL ! Sheep, you seriously want us to change our own country just to make you feel more welcomed ? You've got to be kidding me... get the hell out If you don't like It.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
12 Dec 2009 /  #50
Personally, I have been made to feel welcome by many, Greg. That's just my way, I put out good energy and I tend to get received favourably. I wasn't talking about me. I was talking about others who tend to find that some Poles can be resistant and unaccommodating. I am lucky to find helpful folks here.

You have just shown your mentality, though. Thanks for confirming it ;)

Yes, you are in the EU so with rights comes responsibilities, true?
southern 75 | 7,096  
12 Dec 2009 /  #51
In order to be accepted in Poland you must
1.be catholic
2.speak perfect polish
3.have ability to stand prolonged vodka drinking
4.pay.Always pay here and there
5...

I think it is almost impossible for the common foreigner.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
12 Dec 2009 /  #52
I have none of the above but am accepted, southern. Care to explain that one?
southern 75 | 7,096  
12 Dec 2009 /  #53
You think you are accepted.You are not fully integrated.
lowfunk99 10 | 397  
12 Dec 2009 /  #54
In order to be accepted in Poland you must

That's a bunch of BS. I always felt accepted and I only have one of the above.
bolek 6 | 330  
13 Dec 2009 /  #55
I think it is almost impossible for the common foreigner.

Understand where your coming from, can relate to 2/3/4. Poles don't generally accept people who cannot speak proper Polish, Poles have a silly fixation that if your from the west you must be loaded with money, they always say to you that food and drink is cheap for you compared to where you came from, and then compare what they earn and what you earn. I must say things are getting better in this regard.
omalley 2 | 27  
13 Dec 2009 /  #56
People, people, people, share your home, share your street, share your village, your town, your city. Share your county, share your country share your continent, share your world, your planet. Because at the end of the day it’s all the same, we are all brothers and sisters. If you see a stranger or tourist or hear someone speaking a different language, just go over and give them a big hug and say ‘WELCOME’
time means 5 | 1,309  
13 Dec 2009 /  #57
People, people, people, share your home, share your street, share your village, your town, your city

Coming from someone who posted about the "Brits are coming" and hopes they stay away from Gydinia.

Practice what you preach!
ShawnH 8 | 1,507  
13 Dec 2009 /  #58
If you see a stranger or tourist or hear someone speaking a different language, just go over and give them a big hug and say 'WELCOME'

I think you found Lodz-the-Boat's Stash, haven't you?

8-)
McCoy 27 | 1,269  
13 Dec 2009 /  #59
2.speak perfect polish

ww6.tvp.pl/7478,20091125944709.strona

their polish is great. almost no mistakes.
polishcanuck 7 | 462  
14 Dec 2009 /  #60
I must say, everytime i hear a brit say that he/she finds poland a better place to live than the UK, i think to myself, "WTF is wrong with that island?" Having lived in canada nearly my whole life, I couldn't imagine moving to poland. Life in poland seems to me like it is much more difficult that here. I love visiting PL though.

1.be catholic
2.speak perfect polish
3.have ability to stand prolonged vodka drinking
4.pay.Always pay here and there

All this coming from a turk in poland who regularly visits brothels.

I know a lot of Poles in Canada who should have never left Poland. Although they physically live in Canada, in spirit they are in Poland; they watch only TV Polonia, read only Polish magazines, are interested only in Polish matters and are not interested and/or aware of what's going on in Canada.

My cousin is now in her 60s - she moved from Poland to US 14 years ago. She barely speaks any english, watches polish movies and ready polish newspapers.

I hear ya. I stay away from these poles. Generally speaking, i think many 1st gen poles in can/usa are like this because they have been unable to find success in their new homelands. But some genuinely do miss family back in poland.

But i have to say, the children of these polish immigrants are 100% canadian.

From what i see, chinese immigrants in canada are the worst when it comes to integration. Many 2nd generation chinese continue living in china town and simply refuse to learn english/french. F'n disgraceful.

Getting started up in the job market in Aberdeen would be a lesson in futility. It suits a certain kind of skilled worker and I wouldn't be interested in the naff jobs they have.

Seanus, what about working elsewhere in scotland/uk? Do you think you could find a decent job?

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