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Consider going back to Poland?


dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007  
10 Dec 2009 /  #1
Their seems to be plenty of ex-pats who are now living away from home in Poland, and quite a few Poles living in other countries.

So it is with this point that I just wondered how many of you would consider your adopted place as home? How many want to go back to where you came from? If you had to go back, what would it take for that to happen? And lastly If you dont want to go back why not?

I'm not talking about immigration or all that bull crap. I'll give my own experience as an example. I lived in Poland for almost 5 years, and in a blind moment I decided to come back to the UK for various reasons, but one reason was just out of curiosity to see whether or not I had that old feeling of being home again. Which in a very short time I realised that strangely enough, It felt nothing like home and in fact I now feel like I have left home.

So shout up guys and girls, what keeps you in the place you are in, and if you could, would you change it?
bolek 6 | 330  
10 Dec 2009 /  #2
It felt nothing like home and in fact I now feel like I have left home.

have you gone back to Poland?
derek trotter 10 | 203  
10 Dec 2009 /  #3
dtaylor5632
Consider this, people here are bunch of completely different people with their own needs and preferences. It seems nobody give a damn about your feelings. Most of them think - I am not interested. Its sad but it is true.
Juche 9 | 292  
10 Dec 2009 /  #4
how many of you would consider your adopted place as home?

home is a state of mind, friend. And just because you came to Poland four or five years ago whilst looking for some notion of home (because of Polish roots or whatever) doesn't mean the place won't drive you bananas after your sixth year. Just some personal perspective for you to mull over.
Ksysia 25 | 430  
10 Dec 2009 /  #5
I don't consider UK home, even though I like it in general. I miss Poland terribly. I even miss the dirty winter streets, with mud from under the buses spraying on my coat. It's that bad.
derek trotter 10 | 203  
10 Dec 2009 /  #6
He was living in Poland peacefully, met some people, not too many of them showed him bad attitude towards him, no any bad press about ex-pats

You are in UK, constantly hear crap about EE immigrants, steeling jobs, abusing benefit system, flood and so on.
Do you see the reason why he have different attitude towards host country than you?
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
10 Dec 2009 /  #7
What should they be doing, trotter? Trying to accommodate everyone? I don't consider Poland as home, no. However, I do have a family of sorts here and can converse with them quite freely.

Getting started up in the job market in Aberdeen would be a lesson in futility. It suits a certain kind of skilled worker and I wouldn't be interested in the naff jobs they have.
derek trotter 10 | 203  
10 Dec 2009 /  #8
I do have a family of sorts

ask your maiden lady what she think about what you just said
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
10 Dec 2009 /  #9
It's not my blood family, though is it? There's a difference. We've known each other for about 4 years. I've known my blood family for a heckuva lot longer.
stevepl 2 | 49  
10 Dec 2009 /  #10
I've been living in Poland for ten years now. I have a Polish wife and a young son. So I consider Poland my home at the moment. I really don't miss England very much ( apart from the lake district and the yorkshire dales, I was once a keen walker / climber / caver ).

Things aren't easy here but I've always had the impression that it can only get better. When I was in the UK I always had the impression that it was going to get worse.

The huge decline in UK industry, consumerism gone mad, and the glorification of the service / financial sector being my biggest gripes.

The only sad thing is, that I can see the same **** begining to happen over here. (In most small towns a huge amount of the commercial properties in the town squares have been taken over by banks etc). Crazy increases in property prices and the lambs being led to the slaughter of 'releasing the equity in their property '
OP dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007  
10 Dec 2009 /  #11
have you gone back to Poland?

Not yet, looking at heading back just before summer.

And just because you came to Poland four or five years ago whilst looking for some notion of home (because of Polish roots or whatever)

I think you miss understood. I didn't have any roots in Poland to start with.
Bzibzioh  
11 Dec 2009 /  #12
How many want to go back to where you came from?

I know a lot of Poles in Canada who should have never left Poland. Although they physically live in Canada, in spirit they are in Poland; they watch only TV Polonia, read only Polish magazines, are interested only in Polish matters and are not interested and/or aware of what's going on in Canada. To the point of total ridiculousness sometimes; once my kole┼╝anka called and she was surprised that stores were closed. I told her that today is Victoria's Day (holiday in Canada), she didn't know that. What I'm saying is some people are making a horrible mistake when leaving their country: made an impulsive or opportunistic decision without really thinking it through. They are just not an emigrant material.
scrappleton - | 829  
11 Dec 2009 /  #13
in spirit they are in Poland; they watch only TV Polonia, read only Polish magazines, are interested only in Polish matters and are not interested and/or aware of what's going on in Canada. To the point of total ridiculousness

Lol, sounds like NW Chicago.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
11 Dec 2009 /  #14
Bzibzioh, very good post! That's the way it is. They form enclaves in the UK too and band together as 'the misery bunch'. They are so similar to the Japanese in their level of insularity, it's staggering! They are like those detached from the Borg when they were the ultimate collective! They are surprised when I don't know a couple of Polish holidays, like Poland was the centre of the universe!

Many Brits are fed up with them trying to create a mini Poland in their domain. To me, it's diversity and Britain has flourished on it for years.
Bzibzioh  
11 Dec 2009 /  #15
They are like those detached from the Borg when they were the ultimate collective! They are surprised when I don't know a couple of Polish holidays, like Poland was the centre of the universe!

I don't get that. Explain.

Many Brits are fed up with them trying to create a mini Poland in their domain. To me, it's diversity and Britain has flourished on it for years.

If they are staying in Britain temporary it's OK although it would not hurt to get to know and learn something about your new place. Don't make diversity mandatory; you know, freedom of choice and stuff ...
Wroclaw Boy  
11 Dec 2009 /  #16
They are surprised when I don't know a couple of Polish holidays, like Poland was the centre of the universe!

Thats ignoranve and lack of exposure to the real world, its the same whn you tell somebody you dont speak Polish but they continue babbling on as though you have to understand.

I don't get that. Explain.

Star Trek banter.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
11 Dec 2009 /  #17
Bzibzioh, as WB said, it is about a collective entity in Star Trek called the Borg who functioned as an autonomous unit, fully self-subsistent and dependent. I'm all for freedom of reasonable choice. In this case, que sera sera.

Exactly, WB. I had that early days. They would gibber at the rate of knots and I was only able to say 'nie rozumiem' back then. They are almost like the French in that way, this insistence on you using their language when we didn't even get taught it in schools.
McCoy 27 | 1,269  
11 Dec 2009 /  #18
like Poland was the centre of the universe!

it is. for Poles. your life, your home, your family, your country, your problems are always your private center of the universe. nothing wrong with this.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
11 Dec 2009 /  #19
But not at the expense of expecting foreigners to somehow know everything about your culture too. A little dropping of the guard is what I'm talking about. Stop thrusting your ideas too much and try to accommodate others. You are in the EU now so you have to be flexible and take the bad with the good.
Bzibzioh  
11 Dec 2009 /  #20
You are in the EU now so you have to be flexible and take the bad with the good.

We prefer to take all the good and leave all the bad for you :) Why Poland has to go to the dogs like UK? Example of Britain overaccommodation is a good lesson of what not to do.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
11 Dec 2009 /  #21
I've noticed, Bzibby. Dogs like the UK? Come again!? Britain is a small island and we are swamped by all sorts, what do you expect? It is Poles that can often be found 8 to one house.
Wroclaw Boy  
11 Dec 2009 /  #22
Why Poland has to go to the dogs like UK?

Go to?
Harry  
11 Dec 2009 /  #23
Precisely.

Although to be fair it is slowly on the way back.
time means 5 | 1,310  
11 Dec 2009 /  #24
I have left home

What took you to rural Fermangh in the first place?

Krakow to some tiny village in Fermangh are like chalk and cheese. Maybe your just a city boy Dave.
Bzibzioh  
11 Dec 2009 /  #25
Dogs like the UK? Come again!?

What?

Isn't UK budget 175 billion pounds annually in the red? Those social services are lovely but they are damn expensive and they can easily bankrupt the country. I wouldn't like Poland to make the same mistake.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
11 Dec 2009 /  #26
Who really knows? Even Darling (perhaps especially Darling) doesn't know the figures that well. There are those that could bail Britain out in an instant. It's all spin that we can't recover. I've said it before and I'll say it again, Britain is a country of boom&bust. We are accustomed to riding the wave of hardship and emerging in a better position.

Oh, and we'll still have those social services at the end of the day :)
jwojcie 2 | 763  
11 Dec 2009 /  #27
I wouldn't like Poland to make the same mistake.

Well, Poland made this mistake, and then bankrupted, after that communism collapsed :-)
We are still making the same mistake, but at a slower rate than UK... Hm.. sorry, it is OT.
Wroclaw Boy  
11 Dec 2009 /  #28
I wouldn't like Poland to make the same mistake.

Would you prefer Poles to die through lack of proper treatment? That is exactly what is happening right now within the state hospitals, emergency treatment only. You literally have to be dieing to get care in many NFZ hospitals.
Bzibzioh  
11 Dec 2009 /  #29
We are getting off topic, boys.

And to get us back on track ... ok, just cos I feel patriotic today here it is:


Wroclaw Boy  
11 Dec 2009 /  #30
Which in a very short time I realised that strangely enough, It felt nothing like home and in fact I now feel like I have left home.

You sound quite confused at the moment, the problem with leaving a country and then returning is not only re-entry shock but all the reasons for you leaving in the first place will come flooding back. Maybe you slip back into some bad habits!!

There is a process to emmigrating it works in three stages:

1. total amusement, everything is great. 1 year

2. reality kicks in, the realisation that this is life now, the little things become annoying you begin to miss certain things from your past life. 2 -3 years

3. total acceptance, you have adjusted and now live in your new country. 3 years +

Problem is when you re-patriate you have to go through the whole proccess again.

I dont consider Poland my home, Englands my home but i dont want to bring up my daughter in that country either. I know that if i went back there to live i wouldnt like it after a couple of months.

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