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Who were European natives? What happened to them? Where they are?


Daisy 3 | 1,227  
29 Sep 2008 /  #61
Read up about all the different Indo-European pre-Christian belief systems then

If you read Jung’s 'man and his symbols', you will see there is a correlation between all belief systems

Interesting small article. The man knows who his ancestors living 3000 years ago were:

That's impressive, there's a council estate near me, where most children don't know who their own fathers are
osiol 55 | 3,922  
29 Sep 2008 /  #62
What happened to all the caves though?

Interesting small article

There was a similar story about a man in Cheddar. No, not the cheese - a small town in the southwest of England. This chap's DNA matched that of the remains of a prehistoric bloke found in... um... a cave!

If you read Jung’s 'man and his symbols', you will see there is a correlation between all belief systems

The similarities and the differences are what tell us things about the people who people who practised them. Indo European religions were a lot more similar to eachother than those of other cultures from neighbouring regions and from what can be learnt about the belief systems in Europe that preceded them.
Bartolome 2 | 1,085  
29 Sep 2008 /  #63
What happened to all the caves though?

Taken over by spea..spaeo..., well, people who seek bruises there.
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 10,548  
29 Sep 2008 /  #64
3000 years back they were hardly cavemen....at the same time, not far away:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nebra_skydisk

...the find reconfirms that the astronomical knowledge and abilities of the people of the European Bronze Age included close observation of the yearly course of the Sun, and the angle between its rising and setting points at summer and winter solstice. While Stonehenge and the Neolithic "circular ditches" such as the 5th millennium BC Goseck circle were used to mark the solstices, the disk is the oldest known "portable" instrument to allow such measurements...

Bartolome 2 | 1,085  
29 Sep 2008 /  #65
Yeah, I expressed it in a wrong way, they were buried in cave, it was already the Bronze Age.
Daisy 3 | 1,227  
29 Sep 2008 /  #66
Recent archeaological findings seem to point at Stone henge being a giant healing centre, with people travelling from across Europe...a sort of ancient Lourdes

open2.net/timewatch/2008/stonehenge.html

anyway I prefer Avebury to stone henge
southern 75 | 7,096  
29 Sep 2008 /  #67
Cro-magnon

and
southern:
Homo Sapiens

are the same

Genius remark.Try to find a Cro-Magnon today and I will give you lolipop.
OP Crow 147 | 9,312  
29 Sep 2008 /  #68
save this thread people, don`t kill it. speak about something interesting, forget on all elections of this world, forget politics in history, just follow your imagination, at least for a moment

don`t kill feeling, don`t kill internet, KILL YOUR TV
osiol 55 | 3,922  
29 Sep 2008 /  #69
Genius remark.Try to find a Cro-Magnon today and I will give you lolipop

Every living human today is Homo sapiens sapiens.
Cro-Magnon man was also Homo sapiens sapiens.
Neanderthals were Homo sapiens neanderthalensis or Homo neanderthalensis.

Cro-Magnon mtDNA has been found to be of Haplogroup N, one of the two strains (along with Haplogroup M) that migrated out of Africa, from which all other non-African and some African haplogroups descend.

No, we're not exactly Cro-Magnon these days, but it is possible that modern Europeans, at least in part, descend from this group of prehistoric people.
Hueg - | 320  
29 Sep 2008 /  #70
Cro-Magnon mtDNA has been found to be of Haplogroup N, one of the two strains (along with Haplogroup M) that migrated out of Africa, from which all other non-African and some African haplogroups descend.

None of this is googled either Southern. :)

edit: Did anyone see the documentary on the small "hobbit" homo floresiensis? Facinating stuff.
osiol 55 | 3,922  
29 Sep 2008 /  #71
googled

Ever read a book?
Barney 15 | 1,476  
29 Sep 2008 /  #72
Genius remark.

Just switched on, watching newsnight, Thanks Donkey.

Cro-Magnon and Homo sapien sapien are the same.

Never seen prehistoric porn? I'm sure you have. Oh and animal on animal is not porn its wildlife.

You strike me as the kind of guy who eats toast in the bath

Cro-magnon Again vanished through Homo Sapiens action.

Genius remark............toast eating porn monkey!!
Hueg - | 320  
29 Sep 2008 /  #73
Ever read a book?

Yes I can even sneak you into a library if you send me your resume and £300 for handling fees dependant upon a police check of course. :) Remember to keep your voice down though and preferably wear shoes.
osiol 55 | 3,922  
29 Sep 2008 /  #74
It had better be a good library. The local one has a lort of Mills & Boon and Arthur C. Clarke. I wonder if my own personal library actually beats it, especially with the 1962 Readers Digest Atlas of the British Isles, Brewer's Phrase & Fable and a wide selection of Mr. Men books.
Daisy 3 | 1,227  
29 Sep 2008 /  #75
Try to find a Cro-Magnon today and I will give you lolipop.

What about Crow-Magnon?
Softsong 5 | 495  
30 Sep 2008 /  #76
As far as matriarchal DNA goes, Haplogroup U is the oldest and considered the first in Europe. This group of people existed along with Neanderthal. Haplogroup U breaks down to subgroups and is scattered among all Europeans to varying degrees, but the highest frequency of this Haplogroup occurs in Finland, Haplogroup U5, especially among the Saami reindeer herders. They are considered to be the indigenous people of Europe. And they pre-dated Vikings.
celinski 31 | 1,258  
30 Sep 2008 /  #77
Haplogroup

Thanks for the information, I was not aware they could break it down like this.

U5: The mitochondrial super-haplogroup U encompasses haplogroups U1-U7 and haplogroup K. Haplogroup U5, with its own multiple lineages nested within, is the oldest European-specific haplogroup, and its origin dates to approximately 50,000 years ago. Most likely arising in the Near East, and spreading into Europe in a very early expansion, the presence of haplogroup U5 in Europe pre-dates the expansion of agriculture in Europe. Haplogroup U5a1—a lineage within haplogroup U5—arose in Europe approximately 30,000 years ago, and is mainly found in northwest Europe. In the context of its rather ancient origin, the modern distribution of haplogroup U5a1 suggests that individuals bearing this haplogroup were part the initial expansion tracking the retreat of ice sheets from Europe. Bryan Sykes in his Seven Daughters of Eve book named this mtDNA haplogroup Ursula.

Brian Hamman's Clan Ursula (U5 sub-group) Website
MtDNA Haplogroup U5 Webpage at WorldFamilies.net

http://www.kerchner.com/haplogroups-mtdna.htm
Softsong 5 | 495  
1 Oct 2008 /  #78
Thanks for looking up the specific information and providing a link. Glad you found the information interesting. I had my MtDNA tested last fall, and I am part of the U5 haplogroup. I was disaapointed at first thinking that I would be from Haplogroup H. However, a number of Poles belong to this group, as well.
joepilsudski 26 | 1,389  
9 Oct 2008 /  #79
What were the beliefs ?

They were animists and nature worshippers; they worshipped the phallus, and practiced human sacrifice to fertility gods...On the other other hand, I have read some 'histories' from anthropologists stating that , at least in parts of the Iberian peninsula and France, ancient society was primarily agricultural and based on matriarchy, and was peaceful in nature...The problems came later when Scythians or their relatives, invaded with HORSES, and turned the peaceful agricultural society into a 'slash and burn' 'hunter-gatherer' modality...the religion of this matriarchal society was probably a form of nature worship, without overt 'phallic' symbolism and such.

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