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Daniel Pelka murder: Polish mother and stepfather face life sentences


jon357 63 | 14,139
1 Aug 2013 #1
A very sad story.

The mother and stepfather of a four-year-old boy who was battered to death after being subjected to a six-month regime of starvation and physical torture will be jailed for life on Friday after being found guilty of murdering the boy, whose body was so emaciated that one experienced health worker compared it to that of a concentration camp victim.
Jurors took under four hours to unanimously convict Daniel Pelka's mother, Magdelena Luczak, and stepfather, Mariusz Krezolek, following a nine-week trial at Birmingham crown court. A review has been launched to establish why chances to save Daniel were missed before the pair starved and killed him.

theguardian.com/uk-news/2013/jul/31/da niel-pelka-murder-mother-stepfather-guilty
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,671
1 Aug 2013 #2
what a pair of lowlife knuts why do people like this come to the UK for an easy time?
Catalunya - | 2
1 Aug 2013 #3
Do we know if they were known to social services or had criminal records in Poland before they came here?
OP jon357 63 | 14,139
1 Aug 2013 #4
Hard to say. They may have met after they left. Also there's often the idea that the parents know best. We can see here that it isn't always true.

And the UK taxpayer will doubtless have to foot the bill for keeping them in jail, since they are unlikely to want to serve out their life sentences in a Polish jail.
whyikit 6 | 102
1 Aug 2013 #5
Seemingly the guy was wanted in Poland and would be jailed if he returns
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859
1 Aug 2013 #6
Beyond evil. RIP to the poor child.

And the UK taxpayer will doubtless have to foot the bill for keeping them in jail, since they are unlikely to want to serve out their life sentences in a Polish jail.

A tree, some sturdy rope, a shovel and a few bags of limestone.

Should get some change out of a crisp one hundred bill.
Louis75
1 Aug 2013 #7
I hope Daniel is in a better place now and those bastards who made him suffer get what they deserve in jail!
pawian 161 | 9,971
2 Aug 2013 #8
Daniel Pelka murder: mother and stepfather face life sentences

And they got it.
PRAWDA
2 Aug 2013 #9
what a pair of lowlife knuts why do people like this come to the UK for an easy time?

Yes, you rightly ask why Poles come to UK. I don't want any Polish people in UK and any British (including their businesses, like Tesco) in Poland. The hate the Polish people have to bear in England is a good reason for Poland's breaking any ties with UK. Happy?
delphiandomine 83 | 17,726
2 Aug 2013 #10
Which American member do you normally post as?
PRAWDA
2 Aug 2013 #11
Why are you asking? Do you say I post here as an American, under another nick? Prove I do. Are you British Americanophobe? You hate each other, don't you? :)
rybnik 18 | 1,462
2 Aug 2013 #12
A very sad story.

very sad.
what's even sadder, is that no one wanted to get involved.
he could've been saved :(
it's always the innocent children
they should get 25-life!
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859
2 Aug 2013 #13
what's even sadder, is that no one wanted to get involved.

20, 000 kids under eleven were put on record for committing hate crimes in the uk in one year alone -

But they ignore a stick thin kid, sporting two black eyes and who was regularly caught robbing sandwiches and rooting through bins to find some scraps of food.

What a messed up system. How did these cretins run an empire? Its baffling.
Ant63 11 | 403
2 Aug 2013 #14
Quote from the mother of the mother of the child

She said: "I don't know how guilty she is. She was under his [Krezolek's] influence but also England - the British state - are responsible."

"She was a normal girl, we were a normal family. It wouldn't have happened in Poland."

"Will I see [my daughter] before I die?"

I'm sure she will. They will no doubt apply for a transfer to Poland, get a far lesser sentence and be working with children in a few years!!!
Wroclaw 44 | 5,387
2 Aug 2013 #15
"Will I see [my daughter] before I die?"

the daughter has every right to see that her mum gets a visiting order. however, i'm not sure if they get sent to Poland.

it's very convenient that we can blame the rest of the world even after being damned by the evidence of our crimes.

social services, teachers etc may have failed, but that is not a get out clause for murder.
rybnik 18 | 1,462
2 Aug 2013 #16
How did these cretins run an empire?

people just don't want to get involved.
it's not peculiar to the UK. it occurs very often here in the States as you all know :(

It wouldn't have happened in Poland."

can you say denial?
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859
2 Aug 2013 #17
however, i'm not sure if they get sent to Poland.

Once she accepts the sentence and doesnt appeal - she is free to apply for repatriation and to serve her sentence out in Poland. If she decides to appeal, she cant apply for repatriation until the appeal process is fininshed.

The decision then rests with the home office, but repatriation is normally approved.

Im quoting from memory but it falls under EU legislation.
Ant63 11 | 403
2 Aug 2013 #18
however, i'm not sure if they get sent to Poland.

They get sent anywhere in the world. I wasn't suggesting she should be denied this right. It would be her opportunity to find out the truth.

people just don't want to get involved.

It's more complicated than that. For example yesterday in the news early in the day a big mission to round up illegal immigrants was announced. Later in the day, this news was erased. Basically because it was aimed at particular cultures. There is a big fear of not offending other cultures with government employees. PC gone to far. The media is even filtered these days so there is barely a mention of crimes committed by immigrants. Fear of inciting racial hatred.
rybnik 18 | 1,462
2 Aug 2013 #19
It's more complicated than that

I'm afraid it's really not that complicated.
for example, I'm the teacher. I see the bruises; I see the rooting for food; I see the progressive loss of weight. I call the police annonymously.
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859
2 Aug 2013 #20
PC gone to far.

If one of the kids 'parents' joined the edl, the kid would be alive and in foster care.
rybnik 18 | 1,462
2 Aug 2013 #21
joined the edl,

what is the edl?
Ant63 11 | 403
2 Aug 2013 #22
English Defence League

If one of the kids 'parents' joined the edl, the kid would be alive and in foster care.

Quite possibly.

Poland

3000 children missing a year
1700 babies sold (The one's that are known about)
Tier 1 Child trafficking country

If the government is reluctant to get a grip. What can you expect from some of it's people.
Bieganski 17 | 901
2 Aug 2013 #23
The true measure of civility in any society is how well it looks after its most vulnerable.

Britain failed Daniel.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,387
2 Aug 2013 #24
Once she accepts the sentence and doesnt appeal - she is free to apply for repatriation and to serve her sentence out in Poland.

thanks for that, but it has nothing to do with what i said.

i was talking about a 'visiting order', which is a piece of paper.
Ant63 11 | 403
2 Aug 2013 #25
The true measure of civility in any society is how well it looks after its most vulnerable.

Read above. Its self explanatory. Chalk and cheese I would say.

At what point does the state step in and limit the parents authority? It is certainly a tricky one. The child is Polish, I suspect he held a Polish passport and I suspect and the parents had no affiliation with UK other than being here. There are all sorts of legal implications and then you have cultural differences. What is acceptable in Poland may or may not be acceptable in the UK, but schools and government departments are warned repeatedly about discriminating against culture. I experience this in school at any meeting with teachers when they blast on about how they support Polish culture. I doubt they really know what it even is. I don't and I've been with Polish people since 2005.

I have no doubt intervention would have saved the child and in that respect the child was desperately let down. The result of the public enquiry will bring to light the failings, and who is, and why they are to blame for the lack of intervention.

A couple of years too long and we will know.
OP jon357 63 | 14,139
2 Aug 2013 #26
When the Polish kid in Norway was removed from her parents and kidnapped by that Rutkowski guy, I remember reading furious posts here from people who believe the state should never intervene and that the parents also know best.

We need the Norwegian approach - far greater funding for social services, stronger child protection and no messing around.

I wonder what happened to the kid who was kidnapped from Norway and given back to its deeply dodgy parents.
Ant63 11 | 403
2 Aug 2013 #27
i was talking about a 'visiting order', which is a piece of paper.

Of course they would send it to Poland. They won't pay for the trip though :-)
OP jon357 63 | 14,139
2 Aug 2013 #28
The child is Polish, I suspect he held a Polish passport and I suspect and the parents had no affiliation with UK other than being here.

It's very regulated by law. The social services have precisely defined duties and limitations. The year on year budget cuts make it even harder for them, and the government's planned database of all children was scrapped due to the costs of setting it up. That would have stopped some children falling through the net.

The nationality of the parents is irrelevant - the law requires makes the state responsible for the welfare of all children physically present in the UK, regardless of citizenship issues.
Ant63 11 | 403
2 Aug 2013 #29
We need the Norwegian approach - far greater funding for social services, stronger child protection and no messing around.

Agreed Jon. Protect first and be damned afterwards which is how the English court system does work if one of the parents is well meaning. It takes around an hour to get a prohibitive steps order and temporary residence order if you know what to do and which court to go to. Once that's in place you can then fight it out in court away from the child.
OP jon357 63 | 14,139
2 Aug 2013 #30
If the state have to do it as an emergency measure, the committee that is automatically convened have to look into the child's best interests immediately and also have to work with the Crown Prosecution Service. This doesn't always happen though - a radical intervention isn't done lightly (or easily) by social workers, and when a child is in a terrible situation it relies too much on chance that the different agencies/professionals talk to each other. The children's database would have helped - the whole point of it was to flag up visits to the doctor, the hospital, concerns from the school etc and make them visible to all the professionals involved.


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