The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Love  % width posts: 138

Do Irish / British guys like Polish girls?


RevokeNice 15 | 1,860
26 Mar 2012  #31
Is Akimo one of the many foreign brassers that resides in Ireland? Dont like half the population, leave. We wont miss ya. Enjoy your drab communist tower blocks and earning sweet fcuk all an hour.

Ungrateful so and so.
Akimo
26 Mar 2012  #32
Poor joke.
RevokeNice 15 | 1,860
26 Mar 2012  #33
It wasnt a joke. If you dont like circa 50 per cent of the population, what the hell are you still doing in the country? Makes no sense to me. Why not return to whence you came from.
Akimo
26 Mar 2012  #34
RevokeNice is an example of an attitude of Irish man described here - if someone has any doubts.
RevokeNice 15 | 1,860
26 Mar 2012  #35
And you are an example of a whining immigrant who hates the natives but sticks around for the moolah.

Go home.
Akimo
26 Mar 2012  #36
Simply because:
- I like very much more than 50% of Irish population, some of them are my close friends;
- I love my life here with my man (who actually has his own company and offers employment to 10 Irish people) and my friends;
- I love this country;
- I am a free person and feel free to live where I like to live;
RevokeNice 15 | 1,860
26 Mar 2012  #37
- I am a free person and feel free to live where I like to live;

Wrong. You are a squatter.

- I like very much more than 50% of Irish population, some of them are my close friends;

Just not the males.

- I love my life here with my man (who actually has his own company and offers employment to 10 Irish people) and my friends;

Selling PPS numbers to non EU citizens? Advising fellow Poles how to defraud the Irish social welfare system?

- I love this country;

Correction. You love the money you make in this country.

Standard response from the invaders. Pull them up on their native bashing and they start wrapping themselves in the green flag. Claim they love the place and the people.

In reality they are here for one reason and one reason only.

The dollar.

This is getting personal, please refrain from personal insults.
Akimo
26 Mar 2012  #38
Well these correlations clearly exist and you choose to answer to my post this way. And you simply made it clear- black on white - what is the attitude of Irish men towards women described here.

I only wonder what western european woman would fancy a man with such attitude - if any woman at all.
Thank you for sharing your view and attitude.

Thanks God not all Irish men are like that.

.
irishguy11 6 | 157
27 Mar 2012  #39
Akimo,

Please ignore this excuse for a irishman, he has too much time on his hands. If he were a genuine member of the Irish/Polish community he would cop on not to insult people and he would cop on that the irish were in the same situation(before internet was availble).
a.k.
27 Mar 2012  #40
Akimo

I don't know any Irishmen but I believe it's the same as in Poland: if you look in wrong places you meet wrong people. Probably all the nice guys are alreay occupied (married or engaged) and what has left are those who for various reasons can't find anybody for long relationship.

If I go to pub in Poland it would be extremely difficult to find a free intresting man. So where to look? Just like in Poland, you need to have a "net" of friends/acquaintances who will introduce you to intresting people that share with you the same interests/values.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,671
27 Mar 2012  #41
Thank you for sharing your view and attitude.

Thanks God not all Irish men are like that.

but you already said they were...
to be honest I agree with RN, if you have such contempt for 50 per cent of the population, why stay? You know where the airport is right? I would have said the same to those Irish in the 90s who lived in London but were always shouting about how **** the English/England were.

You can think what you like, but resorting to personal and ill informed rants just because you are feeling homesick is a bit crap and very rude.

thing is if all these thousands of Polish who find life so much more comfortable in UK/Ireland went back to their beloved country and worked there, perhaps Poland wouldnt be so shyte.

Just a thought.
a.k.
27 Mar 2012  #42
thing is if all these thousands of Polish who find life so much more comfortable in UK/Ireland went back to their beloved country and worked there, perhaps Poland wouldnt be so shyte.

Please don't reply for insult with insult, ok?
That would be off-topic but the reality is grim for all those people who returned from UK/Ireland. I know such people who returned and now are in their parent's/girlfriend's pays.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,671
27 Mar 2012  #43
why not?
maybe British and Irish are sick of being insulted. At least this one did it in English I suppose, unlike all those biatches on the bus and tube who think nobody can understand their rudeness.

Yes I know things are grim there, so why insult your host country?
a.k.
27 Mar 2012  #44
maybe British and Irish are sick of being insulted.

Are they? Certainly not more than Polish people or American peope on this site. How many threads about Polish women being sluts/gold-diggers I have to read? I'm also tired of them.

But the point is, does insulting leads to anything? No.

Yes I know things are grim there, so why insult your host country?

She just criticises one aspect of living in Ireland, not whole the country.

PS
This is the proof that British people are sensitive about criticism of their country (as well as every nation is). I emphasize this because some people earlier tried to convince me in previous discussions that doesn't happen among British people ;)
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,671
27 Mar 2012  #45
This is the proof that British people are sensitive about criticism of their country

no **** sherlock.
If anyone had to listen to their country/themselves being insulted as much British people do...they wouldnt like it.
And that's in real life, not on some forum.
If we object we are accused of 'racism'.
Immigrants know this, especially since 'my tram experience' going viral on youtube.
For example since that time, my friend was in her local supermarket and noticed the cashier was wearing an 'I speak Polish' badge.
She commented to her son that 'I speak English' might be more useful.
Next thing the girl was shouting abuse at her, trying to draw attention from the public, and accusing her of being 'racist' and 'anti Polish'.

Just a small illustration of my point.
a.k.
27 Mar 2012  #46
Calm down, please.
It's for other users who argued with me about that.

If anyone had to listen to their country/themselves being insulted as much British people do...they wouldnt like it.

They often have to, and you're right, I don't like it too.

And that's in real life, not on some forum.

I feel sorry for that.

Immigrants know this, especially since 'my tram experience' going viral on youtube.

You mean Black people or Polish people? I think that the scandal broke out because she insulted Black people not Poles. Besides that Black people born in Britain are British people, they should not be insulted the way she did.

For example since that time, my friend was in her local supermarket and noticed the cashier was wearing an 'I speak Polish' badge.

Now you are unfair. Probably the badge was to inform that apart English she can communicate in Polish. Isn't it helpful? If you lived in Poland you wish to be served in English, wouldn't you?

Next thing the girl was shouting abuse at her, trying to draw attention from the public, and accusing her of being 'racist' and 'anti Polish'.
Just a small illustration of my point.

That comment of your friend was kind of rude. Have you read oxon's story when he abused some Polish women for chatting in Polish in a bus?!

I board a bus for example and I expect a reasonable respect for my right not to be bombarded by some screeching foreigner having a conversation in some language I do not understand whether it be Polish, Punjab, Indian , Somalian or whatever. They have clearly demonstrated that they have no respect for any local feelings. If I pick my moment and whisper in their ear as they disembark....'get the f*** out my country you wh***' then I will wager that they will think twice before making another phone call in public. Win win situation.

WTF?! What you have against people speaking among themselves with foreign language?! The obsession of British people against foreign languages is beyond me. Abroad you speak English and no one consider it rude or disrespectful. British expats send their children to English speaking schools, hang around among English speaking people. Do you know that in Cracow there is a pub designed for expats? Do you know how many ads/informations on dipaly are in Cracow in English to suit foreign visitors? And you have something against a teller who just has attached an information that she can communicate in Polish?!
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
27 Mar 2012  #47
434 Polish married a Brit, Country population 60 million
327 Polish married a German, Country population 80 million
166 Polish married an Italian, Country population 60 million
117 Polish married a Frenchy, Country population 65 million
116 Polish married Ukrainian, Country population 45 million
115 Polish married Irish, Country population 4 million
110 Polish women married a Nigerian, population 158 million
76 Polish women married an Indian, Country population over a Billion
75 Polish women married a Turk, Country population 73 million

Statistically Ireland is kicking ass :)

In 2009 Poles married foreigner stats

This is the proof that British people are sensitive about criticism of their country (as well as every nation is)

I thought you were talking about Ireland?
a.k.
27 Mar 2012  #48
I thought you were talking about Ireland?

Yes, but rozumienic is British.

Rozumienic

I think you could not get my intentions correctly with this comment:

I owe you some explanation. For that purpose please read the thread "British managers superior to Polish", posts: #49-52, epecially this:

The usual thing what an expat who criticizes a host country can hear is "you know where the door is", regardless if this is a Pole or any other nationality. I saw many times when a Pole criticizing Britain was answered back with such or similar reply.

Some didn't agree with me then, so here we have :)

But don't worry, treat everthing with a pinch of salt, British expats moan about some aspects of Poland, Polish immigrants in Britain moan about some aspects of Britain (and other countries), that just happens everywhere no reason to let it to ruin your day :)
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,671
27 Mar 2012  #49
they should not be insulted the way she did.

ah but how do we know what was said to her before the recording started? That's right we don't.
Incidentally she did NOT racially abuse anyone, Black or not. SHe merely commented rather too loudly that there were very few English on the tram. Then an African woman started shouting about how lazy the English were. needless to say that was fine.

That comment of your friend was kind of rude

Yeh it was but it was a quiet comment to her son, but the Polish girl loved it, it gave her the chance to kick off. I bet she hoped someone was filming, and she might get to be a youtube star.

I have no interest in fukwits like Oxon, people can speak what language they like on the bus. He is an idiot.
a.k.
27 Mar 2012  #50
Yeh it was but it was a quiet comment to her son, but the Polish girl loved it, it gave her the chance to kick off. I bet she hoped someone was filming, and she might get to be a youtube star.

You know what I think? I think she encountered oxon-like individuals before so when she heard the comment of your friend she felt like it was the last straw and outbursted. Your friend was obviously an "innocent" victim of previous abuse the teller has experienced.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,671
27 Mar 2012  #51
Your friend was obviously an "innocent" victim of previous abuse the teller has experienced.

maybe........
polishmama 3 | 280
27 Mar 2012  #52
For example since that time, my friend was in her local supermarket and noticed the cashier was wearing an 'I speak Polish' badge.

Is this in a video somewhere? To anyone with some sense, the badge means that, in addition to her speaking English, she also speaks Polish. It's just a bonus, like an additional tool for those who might not speak English and require help in Polish. Well, that makes sense to anyone but your friend, who frankly I would have taken to be rude as well. Not because I'm Polish. But because, if that badge were "I speak Spanish" or french, etc., I have the common sense to know what that badge is for and that were someone to say what your friend did, they would frankly appear to be xenophobic. And I wouldn't doubt that the cashier got to the breaking point with other such comments.

Oh, and just so you and your friend understand more clearly about the badge, it was extremely probable that the badge was given to her by the management to wear. In other words, it was part of her job. Not some personal policy of her own to go around wearing it, but as part of the policy of a non-xenophobic company.

Btw, a quiet comment that someone else hears and which offends them is just as rude as a comment spoken aloud with the intention of being heard by others. There's nothing polite about whispering insults about others. Any good mama would teach her child that it's rude to whisper about someone in front of them.

The cashier did not call her a nasty name, she just pointed out a xenophobe.
RevokeNice 15 | 1,860
27 Mar 2012  #53
Please ignore this excuse for a irishman, he has too much time on his hands.

I note you are from Draaawhhaaada. Excuse of an Irishman or no, at least I can speak in a coherent manner.

If he were a genuine member of the Irish/Polish community

There is no such thing. There are plenty of Polish communities here, but live in a bubble, outside of the native communities. Not that I mind, this. In fact, I welcome it.

Millions of people visited Dublin over Saint Patricks Day. Clips of hordes of Brits, French, Germans, Spaniards, Canadians, Australians, Americans, Chinese, Maurtians, Dutch, Belgians, South Africans all claiming that they love Ireland and the people are so friendly.

No video clips of the africans, eastern europeans or arabs, mind.

They too busy crying racism to the 200 plus NGOs/Quangos about how evil and racist the Irish are.

Quite a discrepancy.

cop on not to insult people

I agree. I hope that there isnt an Irish women in Australia, Canada or the UK claiming that all the males are no better than pigs. If there was, I would agree with them being lobbed out of the respective country. In a rocket.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,671
27 Mar 2012  #54
I see what you mean of course, but to be honest these days in London, an 'I speak English' badge would probably be the most useful.

You see you have started that 'xenophobe' thing immediately.....it's all so predictable and frankly Londoners are tired of it.
Midas 1 | 571
27 Mar 2012  #55
Akimo

Unfortunate these opinions just happened to be similar in case of Irish men.

These opinions are not only of Polish women, but of women from other nationalities too.

I'm sorry, some of the stuff you wrote can honestly make one wonder whether Ireland happens to be the last fortified position of the Neanderthal human male in Europe.

I personally continue to see that a lot of women from various countries do consider Irish gents charming, resourceful, intelligent, witty and great husband material so I do find your revelations about foreign women sitting down together and complaining how bad Irish males are a tad ridiculous.

Aren't you by any chance projecting a personal negative experience?

Most of Polish women who I know (I know 15 here in Ireland) are with Polish men, only 1 I know is with an Irish man (I must admit he is a lovely person). The same figure appreas among women of other nationalities who I know here.

Sean has been kind enough to point towards the statistics.

In terms of marrying a foreigner, Polish women are statistically very likely to marry an Irishman, which directly contradicts what you wrote. These statistics indicate that a hell lot of Polish women simply LOVE Irish men.

I've got plenty of Irish friends who live in Ireland ( good people, all of them ) and they had often told me that once the "Polish invasion" started Polish women freshly arrived in Ireland were practically fighting one another for a chance of getting with an Irish guy and regarded being with a guy from Poland as some sort of a disgrace.

And now here you come and tell us that Irish men are scum? Whom are you kidding?

To be fair, I think RevokeNice has a bit of a point. Also I can't help but to notice that your odd opinion is expressed at a time when economic prospects for Ireland aren't exactly looking as stellar as they did before.

Could it be that the moment Irish blokes ( due to no fault of their own, bad economy and all ) stopped bringing in as much dinero as they did in 2004 or 2005 you suddenly began to consider them unworthy, undereducated apes? Is Marian from Poland looking a bit more sexy now with his moustache and no mortgage in Dublin that's under the water? Paddy O'Connor's no longer a witty daredevil because he's been laid off?

I do hope I'm not crossing the line here, but to be fair I haven't read such rubbish about Irish men in a long time.

If anyone had to listen to their country/themselves being insulted as much British people do...they wouldnt like it.

I simply love people from all over the world taking a dump on Ireland/UK and then complaining that the locals "are touchy".

Assuming Poland discovers tomorrow it is sitting on one huge shale gas reserve and turns into the next Norway overnight I seriously doubt Poles with their newfound wealth would show one third of the tolerance granted to foreigners in Ireland or the UK once it became apparent that there'd be loads of qualified foreign people coming over to compete on the job market.
polishmama 3 | 280
27 Mar 2012  #56
You see you have started that 'xenophobe' thing immediately.....it's all so predictable and frankly Londoners are tired of it

So are white Americans. But, sadly, some of them are xenophobes. Or racist. And they love to use the phrase "There you go, throwing out the race card". But, the thing is, if someone perceives they are being discriminated against, then most likely they are.

It's idiotic to expect people to wear a badge saying "I speak English" in... England, where the English language is the ancestral language. It's like putting up a sign on the McDonald's counter "This counter is not for sitting on, it's for food to be given to customers". Pointless, waste of time and money. I'm sure the cashier was speaking English when your friend was there, so why in the world would she need a badge that says that? Again, the badge was given to the cashier to wear per the request of management, we can very safely assume. So, why ridicule her in front of her? And why whisper? Let's address that. Whispering an insult about someone in front of them is rude. Your friend was rude. I didn't start the "xenophobe" thing. I call it like I see it. If it looks like a duck, swims like a duck, and quacks like a duck, well, then it must be a duck. A grown person acts like a whispering 9 year old xenophone who lacks manners and basic business knowledge, well, that's what they are. I'm sorry, but it's just plain out rude. I, as a customer, would have also said that to your friend, the fellow customer. It's rude.
Luke21
27 Mar 2012  #57
Duh!
You can't get a customer facing job in England without speaking English. She may be allowed to stack shelves but then only in the night shift when there are no customers who may ask on which aisle such and such is. Are you aware there are near 3 million unemployed to choose from, many under 25 who could do checkout type jobs/low skilled work. Speaking Polish is a bonus to attract more customers that arn't comfortable with English language - cleaners manual laborers etc. I'm glad that the Polish lady pointed out this English woman's ignorant and ill mannered behaviour.
RevokeNice 15 | 1,860
27 Mar 2012  #58
It's rude.

When you migrate to another country, learn the lingo

Same for the Irish that move to Poland.

Its rude not too!

You can't get a customer facing job in England without speaking English. .

Okkkkk.......

Speaking Polish is a bonus to attract more customers that arn't comfortable with English language - cleaners manual laborers

Which contradicts the above. Cleaners in hotels, supermarkets etc. never have to speak to customers, eh?

Wonder what shops, hotels and the like you worked in!
polishmama 3 | 280
27 Mar 2012  #59
When you migrate to another country, learn the lingo

I'm an immigrant. So, I did. And French. And even though it terrifies me to hear it, I understand some German. But when I first moved to the US, we didn't speak English. Nobody who is a political refugee goes to school in their birth country to learn the language of a country that they didn't think they would be moving to, until they do. That's what you learn the "lingo", as you put it. I assume anyone who thinks otherwise is not an immigrant and has no idea what their immigrant ancestors went through. Unless, of course, you count the English to came to North America, stole the land from the natives and forced their own language to be "the lingo". And now are mad because Spanish is popular in the US as well.

Btw, I watched the video "My Tram Experience" just now. Absolutely shameful behaviour for a mother, cursing like that in front of her child and causing distress to him because he's hearing yelling and becoming confused and scared. All the while, dear "mummy" obviously sounds drunk. I have to admit, I don't know how that would have ended in the US. Probably would have ended up in a physical altercation.
RevokeNice 15 | 1,860
27 Mar 2012  #60
stole the land from the natives and forced their own language to be "the lingo".

Which you reside on. Give it back if it concerns you so much.

I'm an immigrant. So, I did.

Good stuff.

I assume anyone who thinks otherwise is not an immigrant

You are right there. I am as indigenous to my country as the red indians are to your adopted one!

And I dont want to end up like them!


Home / Love / Do Irish / British guys like Polish girls?
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.