The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Life  % width posts: 25

Are people in Poland 'made' to give money to their parents?


clewinton
4 Apr 2010 #1
Hello,

Has anyone ever heard of people in Poland being made to give money to there parents?

The reason I ask is I have friend who has moved to England and she is telling me her mother is saying she MUST send her money. I dont know any of the rules in Poland but can this be true?

They dont get along so I am suspecting this is just an attempt to cash in on some money and worry her, but I wonder if there is anything real about it.

Also if someone moves to England what would they normally do with the address on there ID card, as they dont have any address they can use in Poland any more?

Thanks

Charles
wildrover 98 | 4,451
4 Apr 2010 #2
I know its expected for people to support their parents...but i don,t know if there is any law that says you have to , never heard of one...but no doubt somebody who knows more about it will be along to advise you better....
delphiandomine 85 | 18,254
4 Apr 2010 #3
The reason I ask is I have friend who has moved to England and she is telling me her mother is saying she MUST send her money. I dont know any of the rules in Poland but can this be true?

Of course not. The Mother is simply attempting to scare her, or alternatively, she's using her mother has an excuse for something.

Also if someone moves to England what would they normally do with the address on there ID card, as they dont have any address they can use in Poland any more?

Nothing. The fact that you now live abroad doesn't change anything, you're still registered to the address and that's that. If you no longer wish to be bound to the obligation to have an ID card, you can de-register your address - but no-one does this.
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859
4 Apr 2010 #4
I have friend who has moved to England and she is telling me her mother is saying she MUST send her money.

How much did you get hit for.......
Seanus 15 | 19,706
4 Apr 2010 #5
This is more of a Dutch thing, helping your olds out when they get to that age. At least that was what I read when I studied Law.

In Poland? I don't think so. There is no obligation, maybe just expectation for some.
aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
4 Apr 2010 #6
The reason I ask is I have friend who has moved to England and she is telling me her mother is saying she MUST send her money. I dont know any of the rules in Poland but can this be true?

there might be more pressure from the Polish parents to expect money form children, especially those who work abroad, but that solely depends on the family.
plk123 8 | 4,150
5 Apr 2010 #7
yes, pressure.
lesser 4 | 1,311
5 Apr 2010 #8
I think that this is natural to support your parents unless they really don't deserve any help. If you bear your children properly, you wont be left alone when old. Today people are brainwashed by politicians, they prefer to give their money to the state and later expect that state will take care of them. Nevertheless the state is heartless thieve and like Polish Constitutional Tribunal ruled out some time ago, it consider these money not yours any more. So remember before you learn your children "how to axe your parents", that the state give a **** about you. The state wont replace family.
terri 1 | 1,665
5 Apr 2010 #9
Recently, I've heard of cases in Poland, where parents have actually taken their children to Court in order to get financial support from them. So whilst it is normally not 'officially' legally compulsory to help your parents, if a parent has it in mind to get money out of the child, the whole case may end up in Court.

For a child, it is always better to gather such 'evidence' (against the parent) as it considers necessary, just in case.
jeden - | 226
5 Apr 2010 #10
I've heard of cases in Poland

bulshit,

maybe when parents gave the house children and in agreemant ( in donation) was that children had to take care about parents, until their death.
Wroclaw Boy
5 Apr 2010 #11
Poles will for the main part do anything for money, im sorry but its true and why shouldt it be considering the poverty here.

A mother blackmailing a daughter? well - ive heard worse, a lot worse....
terri 1 | 1,665
5 Apr 2010 #12
bulshit,

maybe when parents gave the house children and in agreemant ( in donation) was that children had to take care about parents, until their death.

No, it had NOTHING to do with a promissory undertaking about a house. This is simply and purely based on the fact, that now as children have a better lifestyle than their parents, they should look after the 'less well off parents'. The State supports this, as otherwise the State picks up the bill. Seems strange, but true.

In fact, if a parent is kicked out of a rented flat, the State can, if the child has sufficient space/room ask the child to look after the parent.
lesser 4 | 1,311
5 Apr 2010 #13
For a child, it is always better to gather such 'evidence' (against the parent) as it considers necessary, just in case.

I feel sorry for your parents. Or perhaps this is what they taught you themselves?

When I read about more and more politically correct initiatives in the UK, about your approach to family life, I think that British culture is plain dead. In fact Muslims do a favour for Brits by slowly hijacking their state. Poor Brits no longer will be forced to bother with the rest of British customs which somehow survived the years of leftist indoctrination.
delphiandomine 85 | 18,254
5 Apr 2010 #14
No, it had NOTHING to do with a promissory undertaking about a house. This is simply and purely based on the fact, that now as children have a better lifestyle than their parents, they should look after the 'less well off parents'. The State supports this, as
otherwise the State picks up the bill. Seems strange, but true.

I'd be interested in any concrete details about this - because it seems frankly unbelievable.
terri 1 | 1,665
5 Apr 2010 #15
I feel sorry for your parents. Or perhaps this is what they taught you themselves?

...How can you EVEN think that I was taking about my parents? Why would you NEED to feel sorry for them?
Do you know me at all? I don't think so.
Infortunately, both my parents are dead. Dad died when I was 14, Mum 6 years ago.

I have lived in the UK for over 40 years, but I was talking about the situation as it currently exists in Poland.
LEARN to read - it doesn't really hurt 'that' much.
kondzior 12 | 1,115
5 Apr 2010 #16
Well, I for one, would not have to be "blackmailed" by my parents to make me to take care of them. What kind of the person needs to be brought to the court of law because he dont care that his parents are starvling in the first place?
lesser 4 | 1,311
5 Apr 2010 #17
...How can you EVEN think that I was taking about my parents? Why would you NEED to feel sorry for them?

The one who raise such crazy ideas is likely to be suspected of owning large collection of "evidence" against own parents.

Do you know me at all? I don't think so.

Neither you seems to know much about Poland. Bad apples you can find everywhere but especially Slavic people are known from holding strong family ties. I have heard many foreigners voicing such opinion in the past.
Harry
5 Apr 2010 #18
LEARN to read - it doesn't really hurt 'that' much.

I would love to read something about this support which you think people are forced to pay here: I've been here in Poland for a fair while and have never ever heard of anything like what you claim happens.
recoil - | 26
5 Apr 2010 #19
There is such a thing as alimony for parents.

pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alimenty

It's meant to be used in some extreme cases, I've never heard of anyone involved with such a situation.
jeden - | 226
5 Apr 2010 #20
No, it had NOTHING to do with a promissory undertaking about a house. This is simply and purely based on the fact, that now as children have a better lifestyle than their parents, they should look after the 'less well off parents'.

terri

sorry, my mistake. There is this kind of law in Poland...When parants have no money to live
( niedostatek). Children have to help them. I think it is good

art. 133 par.2 KRO
prasz - | 5
31 Jan 2011 #21
its strange that u need a law to help your own parents. I thought it was a natural human emotion. Its also very strange that Charles has reason to doubt this. If you dont care about your own parents, then whats the whole point of living.
mimi
9 Jul 2011 #22
Yes, there is this kind of law in Poland. You have to pay if the court decides your parents are struggling to make ends meet. However, the doubts I have are more philosophical in nature. While the parents brought their children into existence and by not giving them up for adoption they thus assumed responsibility for their welfare, the children were never given any choice. Perhaps if asked they would never want to live which is not so unlikely as there are people who claim they don't want to live. Therefore I feel this law is a bit off. Parents should earn affection from their children. Otherwise why not have 10 children and have each of them pay you the alimony?
terri 1 | 1,665
10 Jul 2011 #23
>>>terri: ...How can you EVEN think that I was taking about my parents? Why would you NEED to feel sorry for them?

The one who raise such crazy ideas is likely to be suspected of owning large collection of "evidence" against own parents.

terri: Do you know me at all? I don't think so.
Neither you seems to know much about Poland. Bad apples you can find everywhere but especially Slavic people are known from holding strong family ties. I have heard many foreigners voicing such opinion in the past.

Would the person who DID NOT BELIEVE me and had the audacity to tell ME that I do not know much about Poland please send me apologies.

As you can see, there is such a law - so next time, my darling, before you attack me by letting your fingers do the talking and at the same time throwing insults at my deceased parents - get your brain in gear before you open your mouith.
skysoulmate 14 | 1,297
10 Jul 2011 #24
This is a weird thread, no one is "ever forced" to help out his/her parents but to me it seems to be a very natural thing to do and it has nothing to do with being from Poland or anywhere else. I know people who're helping out their parents here in the US and in Sweden and I'm sure it happens in other countries too. My dad lost part of his retirement when a company he worked for went belly up (Sweden), I've been sending money to them for some time and will be doing it as long as I can afford it. I was never pressured into it, never felt that I must do it, in fact they never asked me for any help and often protest when I do. However, they're my parents, I want to help, and I can afford it so why shouldn't I? It's common sense to me.
terri 1 | 1,665
10 Jul 2011 #25
skysoulmate
You help your parents because that is your wish - you don't have to if you don't want.
However, in Poland, the LAW can force you to help. You will have money deducted from your pay if the Law decides that you must help them - and that is the idea of this thread.

Whereas in other countries you do it from your own free wish - in Poland you maybe fiorced to do it - only after a Court decision - but still.


Home / Life / Are people in Poland 'made' to give money to their parents?
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.