The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Language  % width posts: 141

Polish regional accents?


Polonius3 1,000 | 12,449
29 Jun 2010  #1
I can usually distinguish a Kraków accent (czy instead of trzy, jagże instead of jakże), Góral, Ślunsk (weź ta ryńka) and śledzikowanie (is that's what it's called) in Podlasie, as well as Lwów (hard '£' and zaśpiew), but could anyone fill in the missing pieces? For instance, what does Polish with a Wielkopolska accent sound like, or Lublin (they are said to have a very soft 'L'), Kashubia, Masovia, etc.

Perhaps some of our PF linguists could find a good sentence to present in the various dialects to accentuate the difference. I am mostly interested not in regional vocabulary such as (pyrki for potato in Wielkopolska or bana for train in Śląsk), but in their pronunciaton of standard Polish.
frd 7 | 1,399
29 Jun 2010  #2
There were at least 2 threads about accents and how accents are not dialects and slang and I can see another dispute regarding that brewing already ;) I'm a born and brew Silesian but I don't have an accent (at least that's what some girls in Warsaw said)... I think it'd be hard for anyone to guess what part of Poland I'm from.

Showing exact pronunciation on the forum, impossible task anyways,
wiela mosz godzin na blacie?
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,449
29 Jun 2010  #3
Maybe I didn't express myself clearly. I don't mean the peasant jargon of a toothless old babcia, but traces of reigonal pronunciation in the speech of eucated people speaking standard Polish.

For instance Franciszkańska Czy (Trzy) spoken by JPII would be an example. Or the hard '£' of Podlasie and Podkarpacie.
frd 7 | 1,399
29 Jun 2010  #4
I haven't mentioned any peasant jargons - but accents are same for educated and non-educated people. Hence I can't see the need to degrade some poor babcias ;) Actually countryside - if that's what you mean by mentioning "peasants" - is the natural habitat for sustaining different accents and dialects...
pgtx 29 | 3,160
29 Jun 2010  #5
who guess where that's from: "Ide se na pole!"

:)
pgtx 29 | 3,160
29 Jun 2010  #7
yay! you win precel z solą! :)
terri 1 | 1,616
29 Jun 2010  #8
"Ide se na pole!"

...give us something harder.

Also 'nie na pole' but 'na dwor'...
Seanus 15 | 19,706
29 Jun 2010  #9
Both are good :)
terri 1 | 1,616
29 Jun 2010  #10
And those are NOT ACCENTS, they are dialects. Accent is something completely different. In the same way that I can tell a Brummie, a Scouser, a Mancunian and a host of other people, even if all of them spoke perfect English...that is an Accent.

Dialect - we could write books on that...and many learned scholars have done just that.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
29 Jun 2010  #11
Exactly, a HUGE difference.
pgtx 29 | 3,160
29 Jun 2010  #12
Also 'nie na pole' but 'na dwor'...

it is 'na pole'... and it is 'na dwor'... depends on what part of PL.....
jeden - | 226
29 Jun 2010  #13
For instance Franciszkańska Czy (Trzy) spoken by JPII would be an example. Or the hard '£' of Podlasie and Podkarpacie

Prenouncing "trzy" is a mistake
NorthMancPolak 4 | 648
29 Jun 2010  #14
who guess where that's from: "Ide se na pole!"

Górny Śłąsk?
shush 1 | 212
29 Jun 2010  #15
Ide na pole - south, ide na dwor - rest of PL, i believe...
Seanus 15 | 19,706
29 Jun 2010  #16
No, idę na dwór is used here in Upper Silesia.
NorthMancPolak 4 | 648
29 Jun 2010  #17
But all the Upper Silesians I've met over here say "na pole" all the time :)
shush 1 | 212
29 Jun 2010  #19
Not everyone owns land, u know :P

*votes for "na dwor"!*
NorthMancPolak 4 | 648
29 Jun 2010  #20
"Na pole" Rules!

:)

:D

Just to confuse things even more, my family (those who can speak Polish, that is) all say kartofle/kartoflane and absolutely NOT ziemniaki/ziemniaczane - and we are not even slightly German lol!

It's like the ginnel/snicket/alley or teacake/cob/barm stuff you get in England I suppose, lol
terri 1 | 1,616
29 Jun 2010  #21
Tos to ja dobrze wiedzolom ze jest to na pole, ale chiolom was pobaumaczyc....
na pole - gorolskie gwary, bo tom 'dworow nie ma'
shush 1 | 212
29 Jun 2010  #22
kartofle/kartoflane

is considered as "low polish" used by those with no education while

ziemniaki/ziemniaczane

is considered as pure educated polish.
NorthMancPolak 4 | 648
29 Jun 2010  #23
So how come almost all my family (including me) have a university education, lol :)
shush 1 | 212
29 Jun 2010  #24
Well, dunno but that's how it is seen in Poland, no offence :P
NorthMancPolak 4 | 648
29 Jun 2010  #25
Oh actually, come to think of it, my dad was in the building trade, so we probably got it from him lol :D

Mind you, in Poland, English women are "seen" as fat and ugly - so what do I care what "people in Poland" think, haha :p
pgtx 29 | 3,160
29 Jun 2010  #26
is considered as pure educated polish.

hehehe... what?!
Seanus 15 | 19,706
29 Jun 2010  #27
It's simply a regional thing. Kartoffel is from German and you can hear it used here on occasion in Silesia. It's not the sign of a burak at all.
shush 1 | 212
29 Jun 2010  #28
Ziemniak, inne nazwy stosowane w Polsce
* barabola – gwara kresowa – Lwów
* kompera – język łemkowski
* kartofel (z niem. Kartoffel) – zwłaszcza dialekt śląski, ale także w całym kraju
* pyra – gwara poznańska
* grula – gwara góralska (wschodnie Podhale)
* bulwa – język kaszubski
* perka (dawniej) od Peru
* rzepa – Orawa, zachodnie Podhale
* swapka – Orawa

I didnt mean to offend anyone, sorry if i did. In literature people use ziemniak but when they want to imitate eg villagers they use kartofel.

It's simply a regional thing.

It's not only regional thing - it is used everywhere in Poland actually but more formal name would be ziemniak.
pgtx 29 | 3,160
29 Jun 2010  #29
but more formal name would be ziemniak.

and less formal would be ziemniaczek...

;)
NorthMancPolak 4 | 648
29 Jun 2010  #30
People do tend to speak differently to the way they write, even if they are educated. I certainly don't speak in the same way as I write university assignments! But I get better marks than my "ethnic British" colleagues do ;)

and less formal would be ziemniaczek...

;)

It just goes to show that learning language is not only (a) fascinating, but (b) can have a wide range of influences, even within one family.

Most of my family is Masovian, but my dad was apparently from somewhere in the south-east/Ukrainian border; my stepdad was from Lwów but grew up near Katowice; I've lived in the English South-East, Midlands and North, so I use words from all over Poland as well as from all over England.

I may call a barm a cob sometimes, and a potato a kartofel, but you'll never hear me saying "sorry" (Polish use) instead of "przepraszam" lol :)


Home / Language / Polish regional accents?
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.