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'Na pole' or 'na dwor' ?


polishgirltx  
6 Mar 2008 /  #1
I'm from Kraków so i say 'I'm going na pole'. All my Polish friends from different parts of PL say ' na dwór'. And they make fun of me ;) lol.....

How do you say it? :D
JustysiaS 13 | 2,240  
6 Mar 2008 /  #2
you mean go outside? i say 'na dwór', but im from Warmia ;)
Lukasz 49 | 1,746  
6 Mar 2008 /  #3
Na dwór. ;-) My friend always argue with me ... he is form south east Poland (Podkarpacie) and he uses your version.
RJ_cdn - | 267  
6 Mar 2008 /  #4
'Na pole' or 'na dwor' ?

na pomorzu we say "na dwór"
Wroclaw 44 | 5,384  
6 Mar 2008 /  #5
' na dwór'

In this house.
Davey 13 | 388  
6 Mar 2008 /  #6
I say 'na pole' just because most of the Poles I know are from Southern Poland.
JustysiaS 13 | 2,240  
6 Mar 2008 /  #7
ahh i remember when i was a kid and my friend came over to ask if i was coming out, and she asked 'idziesz na podwórek?' lol
OP polishgirltx  
6 Mar 2008 /  #8
yeah....sometimes i just say 'im going na zewnątrz' (outside) lol....
JustysiaS 13 | 2,240  
6 Mar 2008 /  #9
idę na świeże powietrze/idę się przewietrzyć
idę do lasu narobić hałasu lmao
krysia 23 | 3,057  
6 Mar 2008 /  #10
I lived in Warsaw and we said "na dwór". Then when I lived in Krakow they said "na pole". But I never got used to saying "na pole"
Eurola 4 | 1,909  
6 Mar 2008 /  #11
We said "na dwor" in Kieleckie. It always sounds funny to me when I hear "na pole" :)
Tommy  
6 Mar 2008 /  #12
I'm from Kraków so i say 'I'm going na pole'. All my Polish friends from different parts of PL say ' na dwór'. And they make fun of me ;) lol.....

How do you say it? :D

It is quite easy to guess the origin of this difference. In the past , Krakow residents used to live in nice houses and residences, so when they left them they said they were going "na pole," (to the field). The field was sort of a recreation area for them.

All other Poles, in Warsaw and elsewhere, used to live in crumbling cottages, so when they left them, they said they were going "na dwór" (to the mansion). It was their favourite entertainment to look at the mansion and watch people there. Like at the cinema.

That`s what some guy explained to me once.
Matek - | 5  
8 Mar 2008 /  #13
I always tought that "na pole" is used by people living in the villages, didn't know that it actually orginates from Southern Poland. But I does sound unnatural to me, I always used "na dwór".

Now a little quiz for non-polish. Where does "tej" originate? What part of the country. :)
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
8 Mar 2008 /  #14
Na pole is no guarantee of being from the whole of the South of Poland. For example, here in Silesia, which is in the South of Poland, they generally say 'na dwór' more here. Na pole is more of a Kraków term and from the villages as said above
wozzy 8 | 206  
9 Mar 2008 /  #15
In our home in Manchester we always said " na pole" My parents came from the southeast..........
osiol 55 | 3,922  
9 Mar 2008 /  #16
I assume 'na pole' works fine for Poles from any part of the country if it really is a field out there, as opposed to a street, garden, backyard or just the exterior of your spaceship.
Krzysztof 2 | 973  
9 Mar 2008 /  #17
you assume correctly, osiol, when I leave my spaceship I always say "idę na dwór" (I'm from central Poland)
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
9 Mar 2008 /  #18
Well, look at the word, na POLE. I guess a Pole would get it
osiol 55 | 3,922  
9 Mar 2008 /  #19
What is the difference between:
na dwór,
na dworze, and
na świeżym powietrzu?

Poland = land of fields.
I don't know what all those towns, cities and woodlands and forests are all about.
RJ_cdn - | 267  
9 Mar 2008 /  #20
look at the word, na POLE. I guess a Pole would get it

Not really. First time I heard "lets go na pole" my answer was "it will take us 1/2 hr to get there"
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
9 Mar 2008 /  #21
I should have put LOL as I know that many are so accustomed to saying na dwór. It was a sad attempt at a joke RJ, my apologies
Krzysztof 2 | 973  
9 Mar 2008 /  #22
What is the difference between:

na dwór = direction (to go) - iść na dwór, wyjść na dwór
na dworze = stay (to be) - byłem na dworze, "Mama jest na dworze, zaraz ją zawołam"
na świeżym powietrzu = open air [literally: fresh air] (in opposition to indoor activities) - Lubię wypoczynek na świeżym powietrzu.
osiol 55 | 3,922  
9 Mar 2008 /  #23
Thanks, Krzysztof. After I posted, I guessed that was roughly the answer, but it's always nice to have some reassurance sometimes.
Davey 13 | 388  
9 Mar 2008 /  #24
For example, here in Silesia, which is in the South of Poland, they generally say 'na dwór' more here. Na pole is more of a Kraków term and from the villages as said above

When I was in Bieruń(Close to Katowice) in Silesia, they told me 'outside' was na pole, they never said na dwór
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
9 Mar 2008 /  #25
But were they TRUE Silesians or just living in Silesia?
Davey 13 | 388  
9 Mar 2008 /  #26
They were true Silesians.....everyone where they lived said na pole so they got me saying that now=P
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
9 Mar 2008 /  #27
If u meet Hanys people, they invariably say na dwór, I hear it often as I live in Silesia.
Davey 13 | 388  
9 Mar 2008 /  #28
I just asked my cousin about it in an email, i will let you know the answer when he replies=)

Here is the response from my cousin in Bieruń:

'We say 'na pole' because it is regional custom, it is an example of silesian language, there are a lot of differences in 'speaking language' in different parts of Poland'
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
10 Mar 2008 /  #29
Well, my girlfriend is a staunch Silesian with Silesian/German parents and they insist otherwise but the point is hardly worth arguing, especially for a foreigner
TripTic 3 | 95  
10 Mar 2008 /  #30
' na dwór'

Lower Silesian (south west) People say "na dwór"

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