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What do Polish people in Ireland think of Irish food?


PolskaDoll 28 | 2,104  
21 Jul 2009 /  #61
You a fan of mustard, my ma(rip) hated mustard, so I did also.... what recipe would you recommend? Its like a phobia with me now?

I like small amounts of mustard. You can add a teaspoon to mince or potatoes and it will enhance the dish. I eat "raw" with roast beef on bread at times.
OP RevokeNice 15 | 1,859  
21 Jul 2009 /  #62
PolskaDoll

I know that dish, the czechs love it, raw beef with decent bread, I opted out. Cowardice.

In Ireland dijon is served with ham. Me mammy hated it, so did I. As I said, like a phobia now.
daffy 23 | 1,508  
21 Jul 2009 /  #63
Darn it! Now Im hungry! :) lovely list! just lovely!
OP RevokeNice 15 | 1,859  
26 Jul 2009 /  #64
Id this for dinner....nom nom nom

irish stew

Then I had a ride and a smoke. Maybe some beer later.
cjj - | 281  
27 Jul 2009 /  #65
Prods add beans and chips to the Ulster fry, Catholics leave it as it is. Anyone who used red or brown sauce to the breakfast is not right in the head.

Speaking as a Prod, we always blamed the English for adding beans :) Wouldn't've been seen dead adding them ourselves.
And chips? Never, I say.

Anyone got a good word to say about fried drop-scones? Can't remember now where I met them (in a fry)
OP RevokeNice 15 | 1,859  
27 Jul 2009 /  #66
Speaking as a Prod, we always blamed the English for adding beans :) Wouldn't've been seen dead adding them ourselves.
And chips? Never, I say.

You lot just have to be "different" dont you? :)

Anyone got a good word to say about fried drop-scones? Can't remember now where I met them (in a fry)

Never heard of it before, probably a Scottish thing.
cjj - | 281  
27 Jul 2009 /  #67
gosh but i'm starving now.
just eaten 2 wagon wheels on the trot but it's not the same.
emotionally, i need bacon and eggs with fried soda fread and a sausage or two.
OP RevokeNice 15 | 1,859  
27 Jul 2009 /  #68
cjj

You can get the full Irish in Poland easily enough. Dunno about the hun version.
cjj - | 281  
28 Jul 2009 /  #69
i have the buttermilk in the fridge ... no excuse against doing it myself other than laziness.
OP RevokeNice 15 | 1,859  
2 Aug 2009 /  #70
I had this today.

turkey dinner

No smoke this time, as I am off them, no ride either, as I am a born again virgin. :(
time means 5 | 1,310  
2 Aug 2009 /  #71
Cashel blue cheese-fantastic!
Arlene  
2 Aug 2009 /  #72
All my lifes I have been celebrating St. Patrick's Day with my Irish friends, co-workers and neighbors. I get the chance to be invited by Irish friends who cooked Corn Beef & cabbage with potatoes. It is very delicous food on March 17 every year. And I drink Irish Cream Brandy too. And also Irish Soda bread which is so goooooood. Try this in Irish Restarurant. You will love them.
OP RevokeNice 15 | 1,859  
2 Aug 2009 /  #73
Corn Beef & cabbage with potatoes

That is not actually an Irish dish, it is an Irish American dish. Corned beef is British, but as the immigrants from Ireland had little money, they bought the cheapest meet available, corned beef. :) I tried Jelly Eels this afternoon for the first time ever. Its a small cafe operated by a British dude just off Temple Bar. Surprisinly tasty. Anyone got a recipe?
ShelleyS 14 | 2,893  
2 Aug 2009 /  #74
Corned beef is British,

Corned beef hash :0) yum yum pigs bum ;0) Bring on the pickled red cabbage!
krysia 23 | 3,057  
2 Aug 2009 /  #75
What do Polish people in Ireland think of Irish food?

I think they only like Polish food. Some Poles don't like American food, they will try it but they then will change the ingredients like adding ketchup or something else to make it taste like Polish. But every country brings their own style of food with them and stick to it. The chinese making monkey brain stews, Japanese sushi, Koreans eating dogs, Italians with their spaghetti, Hindus with their curry, etc. They will always make their own food regardless where they are.
Pierogi - | 42  
3 Aug 2009 /  #76
I think they only like Polish food.

How does adding ketchup make food taste Polish? lol :-)
OP RevokeNice 15 | 1,859  
3 Aug 2009 /  #77
Some Poles don't like American food

That is a good thing. American food is a heart attack on a plate.
Pierogi - | 42  
3 Aug 2009 /  #78
Not my quote, but still true :)
Arlene  
4 Aug 2009 /  #79
To RevokeNice

Thanks for telling me this. I never knew it.
Polish people have cabbage and polish sausage
German people have cabbage & bratwursch
Irish People have cabbage & corned beef
British too same as Irish. I think.

Russian do make cabbage too. Can't remember what I had.

Oh well.
OP RevokeNice 15 | 1,859  
4 Aug 2009 /  #80
Arlene

No problemo. I prefer the Czech and Polish version. Cabbage, dumpling, and meat. Simple yet tasty.
Cardno85 31 | 976  
4 Aug 2009 /  #81
Simple yet tasty.

The key to great food. Keep it simple, local and work the flavours well (there is a great documentary based in a swiss lab about flavour combinations a few years back)...and you can't go wrong!
OP RevokeNice 15 | 1,859  
4 Aug 2009 /  #82
Cardno85

Good advice, buy local produce if you can. I am thinking of growing my own in the back yard, only problem is my dogs.
ShawnH 8 | 1,507  
4 Aug 2009 /  #83
only problem is my dogs

That could be considered a source of local "produce" ;-)

By the way, I didn't find the authentic Irish Stew Recipe.
Vincent 9 | 842   Moderator
4 Aug 2009 /  #84
By the way, I didn't find the authentic Irish Stew Recipe.

The Irish stew that I have seen (in the North of Ireland) has only 4 ingredients + water, potatoes, onions, carrots and meat (stewing steak or lamb). I dare say some people may now add extra ingredients like swede but I have always seen it with the former.

This is simmered for about 40 minutes until most of the water has evaporated and the stew is so thick that you could serve it on a plate rather than a bowl. :)

Like the Polish bigos it gets better when you reheat it next day.
ShawnH 8 | 1,507  
5 Aug 2009 /  #85
has only 4 ingredients + water, potatoes, onions, carrots and meat

No special seasonings?

extra ingredients like swede

Sorry, can't find swede's....
Vincent 9 | 842   Moderator
5 Aug 2009 /  #86
No special seasonings?

Just salt and pepper;)

Here is a link that I found for it.

Irish stew
yourirish.com/irish-stew.htm
ShawnH 8 | 1,507  
5 Aug 2009 /  #87
Here is a link that I found for it.

Thanks Vincent! Will give it a go when I get back from Montreal!
Barney 15 | 1,476  
5 Aug 2009 /  #88
My recipe
Brown of the meat in a pot remove the meat then fry the onions in the same fat over a low heat to soften them. Add the veg (root veg), chopped to your taste and gently fry for about 2 mins. Put the meat back into the pot add some stock and the spuds, simmer until the veg and spuds are to your taste, tender, al dente etc, season. The end product should be quite solid.

The same quantities of veg and spuds should be used

Traditionally the stew is a mush, like baby food with large bits of meat. I dont like it like that. The meat was always mutton but now can be anything bar fish.

I like it when you can see and taste the veg.
ShawnH 8 | 1,507  
5 Aug 2009 /  #89
add some stock

Beef, chicken or Veg?

I like it when you can see and taste the veg.

I would aim for tender but distinguishable.

Thanks Barney.
Barney 15 | 1,476  
5 Aug 2009 /  #90
Beef, chicken or Veg?

Beef would be best.

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