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What do Polish people in Ireland think of Irish food?


OP RevokeNice 15 | 1,854  
21 Jul 2009 /  #31
aphrodisiac

FROM ANOTHER SITE, NOT MINE! (link?)

Yep I meant tay as in tea and yes there is creme fraiche served with the salmon. Butter doesnt work as well with this dish. Bulmers is a great drink to get a girl in the mood.

Prods add beans and chips to the Ulster fry, Catholics leave it as it is. Anyone who used red or brown sauce to the breakfast is not right in the head.
Vincent 9 | 873  
21 Jul 2009 /  #32
good to know:) What's in it please.

The two ingredients that makes it different from an English breakfast is the soda bread and the potato bread. Irish bacon and sausages, seem to taste better as well. In the picture there appears to be some black pudding, but I can honestly say that I have never seen it in an Ulster fry. Just as well as I can't stand the stuff;)

Another ingredient that I have seen is "vegetable roll". Its a bit like a half size hamburger made with sausage meat and has some kind of green herb in it. Some cafes would add a fried pancake as well.

It's no wonder that it is known affectionately as" heart attack on a plate" ;)
OP RevokeNice 15 | 1,854  
21 Jul 2009 /  #33
Vincent

You have never seen white or black pudding on a breakfast plate? You must be a squatter on Irish land. ;)

Did you enjoy your march on the 12th?
PolskaDoll 28 | 2,098  
21 Jul 2009 /  #34
There's no denying that some Irish foods are similar to foods from Poland and other European countries. Threads like these make us realise this...if only they weren't posted so late at night... :)
ShawnH 8 | 1,491  
21 Jul 2009 /  #35
Just after dinner here in Canader :-)
OP RevokeNice 15 | 1,854  
21 Jul 2009 /  #36
PolskaDoll

We are all euopeans, we have traded for centuries it is only natural that recipes get exchanged. Irish food is celtic food.

I adore Czech food out of all the eastern european cuisines.
Cardno85 31 | 973  
21 Jul 2009 /  #37
Bulmers is a great drink to get a girl in the mood.

You might want to fix your picture for that, as the Bulmers in your picture is an English cider, in the UK (due to copyright laws i believe) what you in the Republic know as Bulmers is re-branded as Magners :)

As for breakfasts...I could honestly kill you for going into so much detail about the Ulster Fry...I can almost taste it and I only have instant noodles at the moment!

But it does not sound too dissimilar to some fry ups I've had in Glasgow...just with tattie scones replacing the potato bread and fried normal bread in place of soda bread. Plus I like a wee slice of haggis on there...and of course a good couple of bits of Lorne! Mmmmmm!

That coddle stuff sounds immense too!
Vincent 9 | 873  
21 Jul 2009 /  #38
You have never seen white or black pudding on a breakfast plate? You must be a squatter on Irish land. ;)

I have lived there for 16 years and have not seen it in an Ulster fry.

Did you enjoy your march on the 12th?

I believe not every one marches on the 12th. I thought this thread was about food:)
OP RevokeNice 15 | 1,854  
21 Jul 2009 /  #39
Cardno85

Bulmers/Magners is produced and founded by a company based in Clonmel, County Tipperary. It is Irish.

Havent had an old fry up in months, might partake in one tomorrow.

Vincent

Are you an Ulster protestant?
tornado2007 11 | 2,270  
21 Jul 2009 /  #40
Bulmers is re-branded as Magners :)

they sell both in the uk Bulmers and Magners, i think one is from the North of Ireland and one from the Republic (south) although don't quote me on that being a fact, all i know is that they sell both brands.

Bulmers
Magners
OP RevokeNice 15 | 1,854  
21 Jul 2009 /  #41
Magners is hun cider, when abroad only the finest Bulmers touchs my lips.
tornado2007 11 | 2,270  
21 Jul 2009 /  #42
i was right then :):):)

Although i have to say Revokenice that the real cider is made in Somerset :)
Cardno85 31 | 973  
21 Jul 2009 /  #43
Bulmers/Magners is produced and founded by a company based in Clonmel, County Tipperary. It is Irish.

I am aware of this. However the reason for the name change to Magners in the UK is that there is already a company registered with that name. Bulmers Cider in the UK comes for Herefordshire and looks like the picture you posted.

bulmers.co.uk/hpbulmers/company_history.html

However the Irish Bulmers looks more like this:

Bulmers beer

Pedantic I know...
OP RevokeNice 15 | 1,854  
21 Jul 2009 /  #44
tornado2007

Magners is brewed in Clonmel, County Tipperary, Republic of Ireland. You huns cannot rob our ciders, yours are garbage. I do not drink Magners for the same reason I do not drink Bushmills. Protestant whiskey.

Cardno85

Is there no end to your theft of Irish culture? Ulster fry me bollix, it has been created on Irish soil. Next the prods will be making up a language, oh wait they have already done that. Brekkie tatties is Ulster scaaaawts(loyalist) for breakfast!!
PolskaDoll 28 | 2,098  
21 Jul 2009 /  #45
Just after dinner here in Canader :-)

True of course. Plenty of time for the Canadians and Americans to try out some of the grub in this thread. :) Just don't tell us about it... :P

We are all euopeans, we have traded for centuries it is only natural that recipes get exchanged.

It's true. Many recipes are variations on another country's. So it's difficult to ascertain where something has originated from. It is interesting how one country takes a dish and makes it different. :)

Are you an Ulster protestant?

Nothing to do with a food thread so leave it alone.
tornado2007 11 | 2,270  
21 Jul 2009 /  #46
looks like the picture you posted

i thought i posted that pic :)

However the Irish Bulmers looks more like this:

yeah thats right, in the North its Bulmers and in the South its Magners.

Magners is brewed in Clonmel, County Tipperary, Republic of Ireland. You huns cannot rob our ciders, yours are garbage. I do not drink Magners for the same reason I do not drink Bushmills. Protestant whiskey.

wow wow wow wow wow who said anything about me being a hun, yes i'm a Rangers fan but i'm not into all that shite, Somerset is in England as you know and that is where i'm refering too :) As for the Bulmers/Magners debate, i'm actually with you, Magners wins hands down!!!
Vincent 9 | 873  
21 Jul 2009 /  #47
Are you an Ulster protestant?

I never talk about religion because it is unimportant to me what a persons religious beliefs
are. Now are you going to keep on topic or shall I close this thread?
Cardno85 31 | 973  
21 Jul 2009 /  #48
yeah thats right, in the North its Bulmers and in the South its Magners.

Other way round...as Bulmers in the UK (as the North still is) is an English cider.

I meant the picture he posted way up the thread...however yours is also of the English Bulmers. They are similar (great bit of thievery marketing from the English) but there are slight differences in the label and the English one is slightly more bitter.
OP RevokeNice 15 | 1,854  
21 Jul 2009 /  #49
Vincent

No, it would emphasise on why you never tried white/black pudding though. Next time you are in the free state, purchase some puddings, and haggle with the seller. You will love decent pudding, not the mass manufactured garbage the supermarkets sell. Farmers markets is where it is at!

Do not accept second best, demand good produce at a fair price. The farmers will sell you pig swill at top dollar if you let them.

Cardno85

Bulmers/Magners is Irish. End of story.
tornado2007 11 | 2,270  
21 Jul 2009 /  #50
Bulmers/Magners is Irish. End of story.

you certainly don't mince your words :) not bad for a.............. nah i won't say anything, i'm not that way inclined.
OP RevokeNice 15 | 1,854  
21 Jul 2009 /  #51
tornado2007

For a paddy/mick/taig, please I care not a jot about racial slurs. Use them if you want. I am a Taig and proud. Fooking right I dont mince my words. Why should I? I live in an independent and sovereign country. Brit, wanna intern me for it?

Hmmm mince, I have a few new recipes for mince. Not a massive fan of mince, but if ....anyones interested?

Let us concentrate on good food, yes? Thats what this thread is all about, swapping ideas and recipes.

Oh, and one more thing, nobody has mentioned mustard in their dishes. I am not a fan of it, yet I have a jar of dijon in my fridge. Is it popular in Poland?
Cardno85 31 | 973  
21 Jul 2009 /  #52
Not a massive fan of mince

I am a massive fan of mince, my mum used to make it every Monday for dinner.

My mum's mince + tatties (apologies...i never measured any weights or stuff):
Mince
Onion
Carrots (fresh from the garden!)
Oxo Cube
Bisto
Water
Oil

Sweat off your onion in the oil in the bottom of a pan, add mince and brown. Add in carrots, oxo cube and a small amount of water (more can be added later if needed) and then your bisto to thicken and to taste. Bit of seasoning and bob's yer uncle.

As for tatties, just get some, peel, boil, add cream and butter then mash :D
OP RevokeNice 15 | 1,854  
21 Jul 2009 /  #53
Cardno85

Now that is comfort food. Real rainy day stuff. Similar to sheperds pie/cottage pie, no?

Washed down with a large glass of milk and a decent cup of tay?

Do your family grow your own carrots(veg)? Any advice for us?
Cardno85 31 | 973  
21 Jul 2009 /  #54
Similar to sheperds pie/cottage pie, no?

Pretty much the same stuff, just the potatoes on the side instead of on top.

Washed down with a large glass of milk and a decent cup of tay?

Actually the large glass of (has to be ice cold) milk is a damn good shout. As for tea, not a big fan at the moment (too hot for me) but in winter i go through the stuff by the gallon!

Do your family grow your own carrots(veg)? Any advice for us?

My Grandpa grows all his own veg, at my mum's house we would love to, but the mixture of small garden and big dog makes it difficult. But my Grandparents are not far off :) As for advice, lots of hard work will lead to better veg, double dig your garden and plant carefully in rows. Weed regularly and look after the place. It's simple enough, but tough!
tornado2007 11 | 2,270  
21 Jul 2009 /  #55
Brit, wanna intern me for it?

hahahaha, of course not, i said i'm not into all that shite. I was making a joke out of it, can be hard to tell just in writting but honestly that was my intent.
OP RevokeNice 15 | 1,854  
21 Jul 2009 /  #56
My Grandpa grows all his own veg, at my mum's house we would love to, but the mixture of small garden and big dog makes it difficult. But my Grandparents are not far off :) As for advice, lots of hard work will lead to better veg, double dig your garden and plant carefully in rows. Weed regularly and look after the place. It's simple enough, but tough!

I have four boxer dogs, the cunts ruined my potential strawberries. Still, seems like a nice old recipe. Normally I drink lots of water with a meal, unless it is a special occasion, then I drink vino. But with comfort food, only milk goes with it.

In the UK you lot drink beer with your meal, how the fook?
Cardno85 31 | 973  
21 Jul 2009 /  #57
Is it popular in Poland?

I think it is, there are big mustard sections in the supermarkets and Delis. I love a bit of wholegrain myself.
PolskaDoll 28 | 2,098  
21 Jul 2009 /  #58
I am a massive fan of mince

As am I. Actually we could take your explanation of M&T and add to it whatever we wanted. Onion, garlic, any herbs and spices, potatoes, turnip, cabbage, whatever anyone wants, even red or white wine. It can literally be what the person wants it. Same for the tatties, add some herbs or garlic, cabbage or whatever.

Actually, you could add certain amounts of mustard to either. The options are wide open. :)
Cardno85 31 | 973  
21 Jul 2009 /  #59
In the UK you lot drink beer with your meal, how the fook?

Not me, always cold water or a soft drink. Always has to be something cold with my meal though. I use too much salt (i'm from the west coast of scotland...i can't help it) and so need something thirst quenching often during a meal.

Actually we could take your explanation of M&T and add to it whatever we wanted

Very true...mince is pure versatile!
OP RevokeNice 15 | 1,854  
21 Jul 2009 /  #60
Cut down on your salt intake mate, it is a killer. Seriously, if you have good food in front of you, you dont need much salt. Bad meat needs spice.

PolskaDoll

You a fan of mustard, my ma(rip) hated mustard, so I did also.... what recipe would you recommend? Its like a phobia with me now?

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