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Cookery training and lessons in Poland's education


PinkJewel  
22 Jan 2008 /  #1
I've just read this article about cookery lessons in English schools and it made me think about how, gradually, cooking lessons in schools all over the UK have faded out of the curriculum.

news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/7200949.stm

How much does home cooking/cookery lessons feature in the Polish school curriculum? Is it more than the one hour per week like suggested for English schools? Is it an optional lesson? Do the schools provide the ingredients for each thing to be made or are students expected to provide for themselves?

One of the reasons I ask is that I wonder how much of an influence cooking in schools actually has on cooking at home. Most of the Polish people I know here still cook mostly everything from scratch. I haven't asked any of them these questions yet, I thought I'd ask here first :)
Wroclaw 44 | 5,384  
22 Jan 2008 /  #2
How much does home cooking/cookery lessons feature in the Polish school curriculum?

It doesn't.

I should say that I've never heard about it in Wroclaw.
telefonitika  
22 Jan 2008 /  #3
i used to do Home Ec. classes in school
OP PinkJewel  
22 Jan 2008 /  #4
Now that does surprise me, I wasn't expecting that answer. It used to be here that the girls did cooking (and sewing etc) and the boys did woodwork/metal work but that stopped (years ago) because it was sexist apparently.

Do you think there's a reason it wouldn't appear as part of the educational system, even as an optional subject?

i used to do Home Ec. classes in school

In Poland?

I used to have them here in the UK but they were never up to much. Now I cook because I like it.
plk123 8 | 4,149  
22 Jan 2008 /  #5
Do you think there's a reason it wouldn't appear as part of the educational system, even as an optional subject?

here they cut it out mainly because of $$$. i cook even though i have never had formal training.. i just love to cook and eat. :))
southern 75 | 7,096  
22 Jan 2008 /  #6
I find it very sad to fail on exams on bigos.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,384  
22 Jan 2008 /  #7
Do you think there's a reason it wouldn't appear as part of the educational system, even as an optional subject?

Possible reasons:
Schools can't afford it
It doesn't fit into the already intense curriculum [sp?]
It's one of those things that can be taught at home
osiol 55 | 3,922  
22 Jan 2008 /  #8
Because this thread isn't quite what I wanted it to be about, I'll post something along the lines of what I was thinking of.

I saw in a local college brochure (prospectus is a bit too grand a name for this particular establishment), they have a course called 'Speak Italian - Cook Italian' If only the word Italian had been Polish instead.

the girls did cooking (and sewing etc) and the boys did woodwork/metal work

With hindsight, I should have done cookery - years later I found cooking to be one of my favourite things in life, I was terrible at woodwork, and blah blah blah something about the young donkey being surrounded by girls blah blah blah! No, I wouldn't have done needlework.

Can this stuff really be taught at school?
UK - home economics (silly name) > bad food
Poland - no home economics > very good food
OP PinkJewel  
22 Jan 2008 /  #9
Schools can't afford it
It doesn't fit into the already intense curriculum [sp?]
It's one of those things that can be taught at home

The first two I imagine are true. Budgets get spent on other things but are they really as important as a practical skill like cooking? The same goes with the curriculum, more academic subjects suddenly become more important but I don't think that's a good thing. A practical skill like cooking has many uses.

In the UK I think it is rarely taught at home now. Quick foods like oven cook pizza and micro meals become the norm.

Hopefully it is still something taught at home in Poland, if not, then it's something that should be put back into school education.
southern 75 | 7,096  
22 Jan 2008 /  #10
A practical skill like cooking has many uses.

Here I have to agree.
plk123 8 | 4,149  
22 Jan 2008 /  #11
Hopefully it is still something taught at home in Poland, if not, then it's something that should be put back into school education.

i disagree... that's not a subject for school unless one wants to be a chef and then they have plenty of those type of academies.

A practical skill like cooking has many uses.

i agree there though. teaches one flexibility, attention to details, experimenting etc..
OP PinkJewel  
22 Jan 2008 /  #12
i disagree... that's not a subject for school unless one wants to be a chef and then they have plenty of those type of academies.

Yes, really I meant that it should be taught from the basics up. Becoming a chef is something more.

i agree there though. teaches one flexibility, attention to details, experimenting etc..

I agree.
plk123 8 | 4,149  
22 Jan 2008 /  #13
it should be taught from the basics up.

and that's the part i disagree with... there are way too many things to be learned in school as it is.. cooking could possibly be an elective but it boils down to budgets. i think it should be tought at home just like sex ed. and it ain't happening. :(
OP PinkJewel  
22 Jan 2008 /  #14
There are far too many things to be learned, the curriculum becomes congested. I find it sad that in order to bring in more "modern" subjects, basic cooking loses out. Cooking should be taught at home, I agree with that, however, it doesn't happen, like you say. Why does that happen? Parents are too busy with other things? Careers?

So it's probably a good thing that they try to re-introduce it to English education, but I think Poland (and other countries) should learn from this.
plk123 8 | 4,149  
22 Jan 2008 /  #15
is cooking useful in furthering a kids knowledge? to some extent yes but then some other important subject will suffer. i learned cooking by cooking.. anyone can do that.. i can't even fathom how boring a class about cooking would be.

Parents are too busy with other things? Careers?

you nailed it why it won't really help.. the kid (eventual adult) will not have time to cook either.
OP PinkJewel  
22 Jan 2008 /  #16
is cooking useful in furthering a kids knowledge? to some extent yes but then some other important subject will suffer. i learned cooking by cooking.. anyone can do that.. i can't even fathom how boring a class about cooking would be

Well, yes I think it does. I won't deny, cooking classes when I had them at school were not exciting but I think that at school kids find a lot of subjects boring. I basically learned cooking by cooking too but many kids won't do that. School would give them a basic start. I hope.

OK, other subjects may suffer but who really says they are more important. The current English idea is one hour a week for one term. I think that's a start at least.

you nailed it why it won't really help.. the kid (eventual adult) will not have time to cook either.

I work a long, hard week but still have time for cooking on my days off. Plus sometimes in the evening after work, it's relaxing to cook something from scratch, concentrating on cooking something can break the stress of the day. Anyway, that's slightly off-topic.

I think there's a place in education for learning the basic skills of cooking.
telefonitika  
22 Jan 2008 /  #17
In Poland?

nah in UK i chose to take the subject in the choices you undertake hun..
plk123 8 | 4,149  
22 Jan 2008 /  #18
I think there's a place in education for learning the basic skills of cooking.

why not in extracurricular activity instead? i often cook for my boy scout troop. they all love it so do i. dual purpose and no time from other important activities is sacrificied. :)
sunhp 4 | 23  
26 Jan 2009 /  #19
Merged: Cookery training in Warsaw

Hi, Everybody,
I am looking cook trraining institute at warsaw. It's better to have teaching through englsih medium. if somebody know please feel to write.
plk123 8 | 4,149  
26 Jan 2009 /  #20
schelleracademy.com.pl/index_eng.htm
sunhp 4 | 23  
28 Jan 2009 /  #21
hi, Thanks for information. i found it's very expensive (costly) even short term courses. it's would be great to know any other institute.
plk123 8 | 4,149  
28 Jan 2009 /  #22
i don't think there is another in english.
sql_hunter - | 9  
28 Aug 2009 /  #23
what do u want learn in cooking?
tomcatgemini 5 | 15  
13 Oct 2009 /  #24
which cuisine you want to learn to cook?

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