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WHAT POLISH THINGS COULD/SHOULD BE EXPORTED?


Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446  
24 Jan 2009 /  #1
What things (not necessarily products), ideas, practices, etc. encountered in Poland would you like to see more of in your own countries? Some things that readily come to my mind (although others will have their own priorites) include:

HIGH-POWERED POLISH HOSPITALITY
MORE TRADITION, LESS COMMERCIALISM (so far but with the latter obviously increasing),
MANY FOODS, TIPPLES AND EATING HABITS (including the healthier alternative of eating a light kolacja rather than a heavy dinner as the last meal of the day and accompanying drinks with bite-downs (zagrycha) rather than just pouring alcohol down the gullet,

MORE TIGHTER-KNIT, BETTER INTEGRATED, MULTI-GENERATIONAL FAMILIES (than in the West),
BETTER BEHAVED KIDS (although fast trying to catch up with the West's vicious toxic teens)
MORE VIBRANT RELIGIOUS LIFE (limited not only to the eldlerly with many youth and student ministries)
PRISTINE WILDERNESS AREAS (more than elsewhere in Europe but obviosuly far less than N. America -- this is one thing that cannot be exported).
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
24 Jan 2009 /  #2
1) Hospitality - Many other countries value this quite highly, Polo. They might just do things a little differently. Scotland values this highly

2) Tradition - We live in Europe, Polo. There is a richness of cultural diversity here. Again, Scotland is steeped in tradition.

3) Foods - Lots of people eat light suppers to avoid indigestion and also value snacks. The Poles have a lot of fast food, not the leaders here. Britain has many nibbles.

4) Tighter-knit families - The French drink wine round the table with their kids and are family oriented. The Brits lived under conservatism and family values for a long time. Europe is more hybrid and less racially pure than Poland. You don't impose such things, you work on them.

5) Better behaved kids - Kids are kids. You are affected by romanticism if you really believe that kids are much better behaved. What do you know of kids in France, Germany, Spain, Italy and other countries, Polo?

6) More vibrant religious life - The options are there, Polo. Show me vibrant Catholicism at work and I will be impressed :)

7) Wildlife areas - Poland was blessed with this, it's a question of geography. Scotland was too, as are many other countries.
time means 5 | 1,309  
24 Jan 2009 /  #3
draught polish lager. currently only available in certain pubs in bottles.
McCoy 27 | 1,269  
24 Jan 2009 /  #4
Better behaved kids

human trafficing is highly illegal, seanus ;)

oh, i realise it was this perv Polonius idea. Sorry S. :) :P
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
24 Jan 2009 /  #5
Can you give any examples of draught Polish lager, time means? I always associate Poland with beer and not lager. Lager is more British.

Human trafficking, sheesh. Polo had/has a point, kids appear to be better behaved here. Still, hardly models to follow. They still throw paper airplanes around the room, lol.

No worries, McCoy. Mention of religion and children, hmm...

Religion has become a divisive force in the world. It's good that you have belief in sth but, for me, it's a private issue. When you front religion and don't feel it/let it happen, you are moving into murky waters. Look at those mad readers of the Koran, they're off their chump. The same with any fundamentalists. The Bible is like a major project, as is the Creationism Vs Evolution debate. There is a wealth of info on it, let people seek it out for themselves and don't export it in our modern free access to information, global society.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446  
24 Jan 2009 /  #6
I am totally unfmailair with British kids, but some Brit on the forum said that Polish schools are like heaven compared to British ones, so I am taking that person's word for it.

At least there are no shoot-ups in Polish schools like in the US, where packing a rod is regarded as "cool" in some quarters. But the drug slime IS oozing into the Polish school system, sad to say.
time means 5 | 1,309  
24 Jan 2009 /  #7
zywiec,piast,tyskie, okochim are lager. beer in the uk is such as stones,tetley,caffreys etc and (real ale) black sheep,old peculiar etc. im sure you know this anyway but if you asked for beer over here you would probably get beer and not lager.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
24 Jan 2009 /  #8
It depends on what British school you work in or area that you live in. In general, they are more of a handful but they also have more zip to them. Choose what you prefer.

I wouldn't have a pop at the US. These are isolated incidents caused by irresponsible parents being slack.

Caffreys is not a beer. It's more like a stout. Żywiec is piwo which means beer. The same goes for the other ones. Lager is lighter, around 4%. Beer in Poland,

Tyskie: 5.6%, Lech: 5.2%, Żywiec: over 5%, Żubr: 6% etc etc

Tetley make bitters I think. Lager is jasne piwo. Ask for lager here and you get weird looks.
szkotja2007 27 | 1,498  
24 Jan 2009 /  #9
PRISTINE WILDERNESS AREAS (more than elsewhere in Europe

I disagree - there are many parts of the Highlands of Scotland which look the same as they did thousands of years ago
time means 5 | 1,309  
24 Jan 2009 /  #10
Tetley make bitters I think.

true but nobody (unless your really old ) asks for bitter. it`s either beer or lager. the only thing i have had in poland that you could call a beer (as in uk terms) is dog in the fog.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
24 Jan 2009 /  #11
Yeah but the brewers may disagree with you. Tennents and McEwans being 2 notable Scottish ones. Their ales and their lagers are 2 separate things. They taste different too. I'd much rather drink their ales than their lagers, especially the strong ones (lagers). Tennents Super is anything but that, :) :)
Wroclaw 44 | 5,384  
24 Jan 2009 /  #12
At least there are no shoot-ups in Polish schools like in the US,

Of course you are right. Here we just stab teachers.
It is so obvious that you know absolutely nothing about Poland.
You write all this junk as if you were living in the middle of it, and it were real.

On the same day as the Columbine High drama, someone went nuts in a Wroclaw school. The events were kept out of the news.
Switezianka - | 463  
25 Jan 2009 /  #13
Polonius3,
I'm reading your posts, and one question comes to my mind: Have you ever been to Poland?!
osiol 55 | 3,922  
25 Jan 2009 /  #14
MORE TRADITION, LESS COMMERCIALISM (so far but with the latter obviously increasing),
MANY FOODS,

As we approached the popular fast-food outlet by the main road on the way home, I put all my positive thoughts into the nice tasty meal we'd have when we arrived home, in the hope that positive energy might just counteract the squeal of "Oooh! McDonalds!" from the kids in the back. On this occasion it worked. I didn't have to take an extra-long cigarette break. Eventually, the dinner was kotleti and mashed potato yet again!
Prince 15 | 590  
25 Jan 2009 /  #15
Polonus escaped to USA but would like to see Poland as reservate... even on cost of Russian occupation. all in all he is in USA. If he promoted consumptionist style of life it would be easier to understand why he lives where he lives but he promotes life in poverty and in catholic faith. Why USA ?

It was my comment to whole Polonus activity.
Switezianka - | 463  
25 Jan 2009 /  #16
Yeah, reading his posts one might get an impression that Poland is some kind of a huge ethnographic museum...
southern 75 | 7,096  
25 Jan 2009 /  #17
WHAT POLISH THINGS COULD/SHOULD BE EXPORTED?

Polish girls' mentality.And kiolbasa.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446  
25 Jan 2009 /  #18
Where one happens to live is immaterial. There are thinking people everywhere. I once heard a very good saying in Poland: "Najpierw pomyśl -- to nic nie kosztuje!·" (First think, it doesn't cost a thing). If more people did, we wouldn't have to choose between the fanatical extremes of McWorld (unbridled, media-driven consumerist pop culture taken to the extreme)and Jihad (Muslim fanaticism, Holy War). Between the two extremes is a broad area known as common sense.

There are probably no advocates of Jihad (terrorists, suicide bombers, etc.) on this forum, but the oppsotie extreme, referred to by some as Mc World, also poses a threat to the human psyche, spirit and value system by reducing people to docile consumers miondlessly swept along by passing fads, seasonal idols, fly-by-night gimmickery, de rigueur fashions, etc. Naive young people, who have yet to develop a sense of critcial evaluation, are especially victimised, and many of them do not even know it.

The current global crisis was not caused by Bush or greedy bankers but by stupid people living beyond their means, demanding instant gratification here and now and falling deeper into the debt and foreclosure trap. Naturally the forces of aggressive commercialism kept talking them into high livng on credit, but ultimately it was their stupidity that made them fall for it.

In a world where most people go to bed hungry, isn't there something sick and decadent about having four cars and 5 or 6 flat-screen TV sets plus tonnes of other expensive gadgetry per family? I am referring not to celebs or millionaires but ordinary auto workers in Michigan who have cluttered their lives with this stuff on credit. When they lose their jobs and even their heavily mortgaged homes, they are learning the hard way that unbridled consumerism does not pay.
Switezianka - | 463  
26 Jan 2009 /  #19
Where one happens to live is immaterial.

Well, if you've never been to a place, you can't really know what it's like. And your posts are a great proof of it.
Rafal_1981  
27 Jan 2009 /  #20
Polish beer
like Lech or Tyskie
high-quality bovver boots - they are much cheaper in Poland
car insurance prices ;-]
government (should be send on Madagascar :-])
decent food
time means 5 | 1,309  
27 Jan 2009 /  #21
Polish beer
like Lech or Tyskie

in all the main supermarkets.
noimmigration  
27 Jan 2009 /  #22
Polish beer

I dont thinkso, the germans and czekhs makes the best lager in the world. Polish lager is average.
osiol 55 | 3,922  
27 Jan 2009 /  #23
No. Some of Britain's ales are the best. German and Belgian beers are pretty good. Some Polish beers are very nice, and a refreshing alternative to many of the standard brands found in supermarkets. Have you actually tried Polish beer, noimmigration?
Rafal_1981  
27 Jan 2009 /  #24
Polish beer
like Lech or Tyskie

in all the main supermarkets.

Hey time means
I don't know where you live (but in some place where you can taste polish beer that's for sure :-]).
I live in London so I know that you can find them almost everywhere around here, but this forum is global and I'm sure that there are places where you can't find them, especially outside Europe or the U.S.

tc
time means 5 | 1,309  
27 Jan 2009 /  #25
but this forum is global and I'm sure that there are places where you can't find them, especially outside Europe or the U.S.

very true no probs mate.
Rafal_1981  
28 Jan 2009 /  #26
I dont thinkso, the germans and czekhs makes the best lager in the world. Polish lager is average.

So I'm the average polish guy who likes to drink an average polish beer, savvy? ;-]
Shawn_H  
28 Jan 2009 /  #27
I'm sure that there are places where you can't find them, especially outside Europe or the U.S.

Fortunately, we have them in Canada, Eh.

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