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Are Polish traditions dissapearing


southern 75 | 7,096  
23 Sep 2008 /  #61
I don't know if the symbol of an egg is present in other countries than Poland...

Yes,red eggs are very common in many countries.We use to crash eggs saying ''Christos anesti'' ''Alithos anesti''.Whoever wins gets a golden coin,or wishes whatever.
rdywenur 1 | 157  
23 Sep 2008 /  #62
English language is slowly creeping in to everyday language .

Can you notify the Hispanics over here in this country. They apparently haven't been notified. ;P
OP outintheyard 27 | 517  
24 Sep 2008 /  #63
We use to crash eggs

We still do crash eggs I give the chickens extra calcium and bring over some good hard shells for the win. Store eggs do not have a chance.
beenerschnitzel - | 11  
4 Oct 2008 /  #64
In South bend Inidana USA they celebrate Dyngus day. My step-sister's mother in law was in the paper showing off her goods baked for Dyngus Day!
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448  
16 Oct 2008 /  #65
Thread attached on merging:
WHAT IS QUINTESSENTIALLY POLISH TODAY?

The nameday-birthday thread could be a good springboard to discuss what the true components of today's Polish heritage are. What are the specifically Polish elements of Poland's present-day lifestyle? Normally that concept of heritage/lifestlye involves food, customs, celebrations, pastimes, traditions, beliefs, lore and legends.

Nowadays do Polish traditions involve such:
FOOD as Big Macs, spaghetti bolognese, KFC, hot dogs, pizza, sushi, kebabs, Cheerios, M&Ms, Pepsi, capuccino, tacos, pita bread, etc.?
CELEBRATIONS/CUSTOMS such as Halloween, Santa (plus the whole reindeer, Lapland, elf and chimney nonsense), Valentine's Day, birthdays, St Patrick's Day or CUSTOMS as walking the bride down the aisle, something old, new, borrowed, blue (for the bride's attire), pelting newly-weds with rice or coins, throwing the bridal bouquet, the tooth fairy...

LEGENDARY FIGURES as Robin Hood, Cinderella, Asterisk, Batman, Spider Man, Robocop, Captain Britain, Terminator, etc.
This is just a small cross-section.
The question is not whether anyone likes or dislikes any of the above -- that is totally immaterial. The question is how widely are the above known and practised in today's Poland as opposed to indigenously native notions, images and customs?
Wroclaw 44 | 5,387  
16 Oct 2008 /  #66
WHAT IS QUINTESSENTIALLY POLISH TODAY?

Or, how to create a thread from other posters thoughts and ideas.

One day Polonius you might come up with an entierly original thread.
ShelleyS 14 | 2,893  
16 Oct 2008 /  #67
One day Polonius you might come up with an entierly original thread.

He tried to muscle in on one of my threads about Polish women by creating one the same......damn bloody cheek of the man! Thankfully our dear Mr / Ms Admin caught him!
krakuskabanos 4 | 43  
27 Sep 2009 /  #68
I would hope the Polish people would do anything to stop that. The West has no culture

i am gearing towards polish citizenship and i will surely help preserve your culture. i think it's beautiful no matter if it's a religious culture or not.....

west does not have a culture? oh yeah. definitely. i feel really sorry for them. they're just so proud of their tall buildings, massive houses and their huge cars.......
time means 5 | 1,310  
27 Sep 2009 /  #69
i will surely help preserve your culture

If you are not Polish then surely you will dilute it?
krakuskabanos 4 | 43  
27 Sep 2009 /  #70
and if you are polish? surely i could see that you are already diluting it.
time means 5 | 1,310  
27 Sep 2009 /  #71
krakuskabanos

Are you a politician? You answered my question with a question.

and if you are polish?

No i am not.

[quote=krakuskabanos]surely i could see that you are already diluting it.

And i am not in Polska, so therefore i cannot be diluting it. Unlike you.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
27 Sep 2009 /  #72
Vodka is still being drunk and pickles eaten ;) More seriously, Wigilia is taken seriously with the passing out of opłatek. I think Poland honours its various traditions quite admirably.
krakuskabanos 4 | 43  
27 Sep 2009 /  #73
And i am not in Polska, so therefore i cannot be diluting it. Unlike you.

ah, time means. yes. we meet again.

Are you a politician? You answered my question with a question.

what if i am? what are you going to do about it? huh? you're totally losing it.
time means 5 | 1,310  
27 Sep 2009 /  #74
what are you going to do about it

Not vote for you :-)

you're totally losing it.

Some would say i never had it :-)

ah, time means. yes. we meet again.

Like Holmes and Moriarty
krakuskabanos 4 | 43  
27 Sep 2009 /  #75
If you are not Polish then surely you will dilute it?

thank you for your pm. that was really sweet. oh, and, btw, you do not have any proof at all that i will dilute it. still remains to be seen. i think people who sincerely say that they will look after it should be given a chance. ergo, you cannot declare me as guilty.
polkamaniac 1 | 482  
28 Sep 2009 /  #76
In Buffalo N.Y. we have a great big DYNGUS day parade. Polish Traditions are not lost in North America.My kids are third generation and they celebrate all the traditional polish occasions such as wigilia and wielkanoc.









Trevek 26 | 1,702  
29 Sep 2009 /  #77
The West has no culture.

Yawn... not that again! I suggest you see a bit more of the west than the inside of a McD's which is playing MTV. Perhaps redefine your notion of 'culture'.

Can you name any Polish non-religious holiday tradition?

Maybe not a 'holiday' as such, but 1st of April when kids come to school dressed as members of the opposite sex (boys as girls etc). First day of summer, when kids run away from school.

Zapusty, chasing away the last dark nights.

Drinking to the building of a new house (although it might be religious in that you start praying the builders will actually return the next day).
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
29 Sep 2009 /  #78
Define the West :) Name some traditions and let's discuss them.
Trevek 26 | 1,702  
29 Sep 2009 /  #79
Cheese rolling! Don't you read "Headway"?

Actally, the point was 'culture', but if we include traditions then it's still a long way off...

Playing conkers, traditional music, styles of cooking, literature, theatre, New Year, Hogmanay, traditional sports (Cumbrian wrestling), beer and whisk(e)y making, wedding traditions... Voting in someone who'll betray us every 5 years (7 in the US)...
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
29 Sep 2009 /  #80
You should read up on traditions in Orkney and Shetland, they make for interesting reading. As for Poland, ask the Poles.
Krystal 6 | 95  
29 Sep 2009 /  #81
I really don't think Polish traditions dispappearing. In America my cousins are keeping these Polish Traditionas going. They still have old fashioned Wedding too and foods too.

My parents are gone and so my aunts & uncles. Good things my cousins from Poland are visiting us and we are still keeping it.

Some of us are marrying to other foreigners which it hard to keep up traditions. Some do not like ours. Which is okay by us? We try to celebrating their customs traditions too. Which is fair?
Trevek 26 | 1,702  
30 Sep 2009 /  #82
As for Poland, ask the Poles.

I worked with a Polish theatre company for a few years, doing things like Kolęda and Zapusty carolling.

It was funny when I mentioned some of the things to kids in my class and they laughed, asking me what I thought I was saying. It was the beautiful looks of stunned surprise on their faces when an adult member of the class said, "It's no good, they're too young to know what you're talking about, they wouldn't know about it."

"What? You mean it acually exists?"

Orkney and Shetland have some great stuff (Aly Bain IS god!), so do a few places in Northumbria, like the tar barrels and the swinging of burning balls on New Year's Eve.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
30 Sep 2009 /  #83
I wonder if Poland has fireballs at New Year, like in Stonehaven. They surely don't have first footing although, given their impressive record on hospitality, they could take it on.
Trevek 26 | 1,702  
30 Sep 2009 /  #84
They surely don't have first footing although, given their impressive record on hospitality, they could take it on.

We did carolling on NY once or twice. The hospitality was sound! The carolling season goes/went on into mid January.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
30 Sep 2009 /  #85
What other Polish traditions do you know, Trevek?
Trevek 26 | 1,702  
30 Sep 2009 /  #86
there's a ritual of showing all your fellow students your homework, so they can copy it. The ritual time is about 5 minutes before class. Also, the tradition of cheating in exams.

My wife is a culture animator and did some ( Midsummer) Sobótki singing and rituals in the local village, with the kids.

Obviously, things like the St Andrew's night, fortune telling etc.

I've heard of, or seen a few wedding/funeral traditions (usually specific regions), but I'm not that knowledgeable about them.

More of a Ukranian thing, but there is a tradition of decorating graves with flowers and singing specific songs on a particular day. I saw film of a similar thing in Macedonia.

I've studied a bit about szopka puppets, which used to be commom around Christmas (not the Krakowian style decorative szopkas).
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
30 Sep 2009 /  #87
I've seen that tradition too, the first one. That one stands out the most.
yehudi 1 | 432  
30 Sep 2009 /  #88
But as I grew up, I found that we were taught a bunch of lies.Therfore I lost all faith in all religions.

Don't blame other religions for the problems of catholicism. I know a good religion i can recommend. Not easy to get in to. Not easy to follow. Not popular. But it's fascinating once you get to know it. It has a very long track record and was once quite widespread in Poland too.
LAGirl 9 | 496  
30 Sep 2009 /  #89
łHere in Buffalo they Celebrate Dngus day and every Polish Holiday here. they even have a Pułaski committee and Pułaski day parade.we had Doźynki day a month ago here.

my Boyfriend is on the committee.because is from Poland.Polish traditon among Poles from Poland and Polish Americans are alive and well here.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
5 Oct 2009 /  #90
Some are but most aren't. Poles are pretty traditional people

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