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Are Polish traditions dissapearing


outintheyard 27 | 517  
22 Sep 2008 /  #1
None of my brother or sisters follow any of the polish holiday traditions alike my parents did when I was younger.
sausage 19 | 777  
22 Sep 2008 /  #2
Do you mean religious traditions in poland?
OP outintheyard 27 | 517  
22 Sep 2008 /  #3
religious traditions?

Mostly religious, however there were other holidays non religious
Gosiaa 2 | 89  
22 Sep 2008 /  #4
I noticed after being away from my mother country for a long
while that everything is Anglonised. On television and on packaging
all the signs are using English words instead of translations.
English language is slowly creeping in to everyday language .
Also traditions that were not polish are celebrated like Valentine's day
St Patric's day.
In my opinion Polish nation is slowly being homogenised into Europe.
OP outintheyard 27 | 517  
22 Sep 2008 /  #5
In my opinion Polish nation is slowly being homogenised into Europe.

I would hope the Polish people would do anything to stop that. The West has no culture.
dtaylor 9 | 823  
22 Sep 2008 /  #6
You could argue that the west had a culture, but its been eroded because of immagration.
osiol 55 | 3,922  
22 Sep 2008 /  #7
But it would be a rubbish argument.
Franek 8 | 271  
22 Sep 2008 /  #8
With the demise of The Polish Immigrants, all of the Polish traditions have been all but forgoten by the 2nd generation Polish Americans. The real celebrations are gone..Now Easter means Easter bunnies for the kids, and maybe a Ham?Wielkanoc is a thing of the past.

No more Dyngus or Easter monday
Christmas? A time to spoil the kids with toys. No more Wigilia, no more oplatek. No more midnight mass with koledy
Even a good old time Polish Wedding is gone.. No more PANI MLODA
No more Polish language Polkas. No more Maly Wladziu, Marion Lush, Wesoly Ludwig etc

AHHH! Those were the days

Those were the days when girls were girls and men were men.
OP outintheyard 27 | 517  
22 Sep 2008 /  #9
No more Dyngus

Dyngus is still huge in South Bend Indiana
Franek 8 | 271  
22 Sep 2008 /  #10
An ode to us remaining 1st generation Pollacks

To the health of all the beautiful women, and my wife.
Zdrowie pieknych pan i mojej zony.

To the health of real men …. and yours, you *********!
Zdrowie prawdziwych meszczyzn… i wasze, gówniarze!

No such thing as ugly women, just sober men.
Nie ma brzydkich kobiet, tylko sa trzezwi meszczyzni.

To the health of our wives and lovers - and may they never meet!
Zdrowie zon i kochanek - oby sie nigdy nie spotkaly!

’til we meet next, on the floor.
No, to spotkamy sie na podlodze.
OP outintheyard 27 | 517  
22 Sep 2008 /  #11
An ode to us remaining 1st generation Pollacks

Well worth framing on the wall
OP outintheyard 27 | 517  
22 Sep 2008 /  #13
I am so tired of hearing those words . Who came up with that and why do so many follow the crowd?
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
22 Sep 2008 /  #14
George Bush Senior maybe didn't coin the term but he is known for introducing it to the American public
osiol 55 | 3,922  
22 Sep 2008 /  #15
If I do something because it is a tradition, having new neighbours who do something else won't make any difference. However, traditions evolve, they change. Every tradition had to start somewhere, and many come to a natural end. It was once a tradition to go hunting wild deer around these parts, but that eventually died out. Morris dancing - mmm!
EraAtlantia 2 | 106  
22 Sep 2008 /  #16
new world order is the eventual demise of peoples freedom by the powers that be. they are homogonising everything, language, culture, business, look at all the banks now, so many just went collapse leaving just a few to access...new world order, its been around since the beginning of power structures - the freemasons and illuminati. there are no mistakes or accidents in politics, its an orchestration for us to sing to til it all kicks in.
Switezianka - | 463  
22 Sep 2008 /  #17
sausage:

religious traditions?

Mostly religious, however there were other holidays non religious

Can you name any Polish non-religious holiday tradition?
Franek 8 | 271  
22 Sep 2008 /  #18
Dozynki Polish Harvest festival

Polish Harvest Festivals
In Poland at the end of harvest, which is traditionally on or around August 15th, a crown of straw was placed on the head of a village girl. The mayor of the village then placed a rooster on top of the crown. The girl then led the way from the fields with musicians and villagers. It is said that if the rooster crowed it was considered good luck and the future would be good; if the rooster refused to eat, it was a looked upon as a bad omen and prospects for a good winter were bleak.
Switezianka - | 463  
22 Sep 2008 /  #19
Dozynki Polish Harvest festival

Yes, I agree, it's a non-religious tradition.

And it's becoming less and less popular, because the decrease in employment in agriculture. No reason for most of the society to follow it...
Bartolome 2 | 1,085  
22 Sep 2008 /  #20
Can you name any Polish non-religious holiday tradition?

Polter Abend - in Silesia (perhaps not entirely Polish one, but practised in Poland anyway)
It's a crazy party a day before a wedding - men dress like wenches and women like lads. Not only the young ones, mind you.
Madzia22 - | 72  
22 Sep 2008 /  #21
Also traditions that were not polish are celebrated like Valentine's day

Valentine's day has been in Poland for ages...
McCoy 27 | 1,275  
22 Sep 2008 /  #22
just like helloween. american holidays are nothing but a commercial mutations of old pagan european tradition. :)
Switezianka - | 463  
22 Sep 2008 /  #23
Valentine's day has been in Poland for ages...

How about the Kupała Night? Wasn't that the actual Polish feast of love?

Polter Abend - in Silesia (perhaps not entirely Polish one, but practised in Poland anyway)
It's a crazy party a day before a wedding - men dress like wenches and women like lads. Not only the young ones, mind you.

Never heard of that but sounds cool.

Anyway, secular Polish traditions are mostly local or connected with particular groups of people. The all-Polish traditions are, well, religious...
southern 75 | 7,096  
22 Sep 2008 /  #24
Are Polish traditions dissapearing

Sad.Like everywhere with globalization.
McCoy 27 | 1,275  
22 Sep 2008 /  #25
kupala, dozynki, dziady have also religious background.
Switezianka - | 463  
22 Sep 2008 /  #26
Kupała and Dziady, are quite obvious, but Dożynki?

Anyway, they're still much cooler than Valentine's day :)
noimmigration  
22 Sep 2008 /  #27
I would hope the Polish people would do anything to stop that. The West has no culture.

I didnt know communists had culture either ?
Switezianka - | 463  
22 Sep 2008 /  #28
China and North Korea and Cuba do have a culture.
pawian 168 | 11,014  
22 Sep 2008 /  #29
Yes, most Polish traditions which stand fast today are religious:

Poland Christmas

Poland Easter

Corpus Christi

Peregrination of the copy of the Holy Picture

Palm Sunday

All Saints` Day

However, there are certain lay traditions too. Some are becoming rare, it`s true.

Mushroom hunting

Hand kissing

Ransom demanded from newly weds on the road

Storks in Poland
Switezianka - | 463  
22 Sep 2008 /  #30
Mushroom picking is a way of getting mushroom. It's as much of a tradition as going to the baker's to buy some bread. And it's an excuse to walk around in a forest.

Ransom demanded from newly weds on the road

It derives from the time when wedding could be only a religious ceremony.

Storks????

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