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Polish Protestants


Del boy 20 | 254  
22 Oct 2008 /  #1
Any thoughts about these Poles?
Wroclaw 44 | 5,385  
22 Oct 2008 /  #2
I have no thoughts of importance. Each to their own.

In Wroclaw, like anywhere else, we have various types/forms of worship. All get along fine.
OP Del boy 20 | 254  
22 Oct 2008 /  #3
Wroclaw

Any more comments form ours valuable Polish Forums contributors?
osiol 55 | 3,922  
22 Oct 2008 /  #4
Yes. Why is there no Wikipedia article on them like there is for the following:

Eastern Orthodoxy in Poland
Islam in Poland
Buddhism in Poland
Hinduism in Poland

Okay, so how did Protestantism get there and stay there, and are they mostly Lutheran (as I'd imagine)?
Barney 15 | 1,476  
22 Oct 2008 /  #5
Del what are your thoughts?

The only thing I think I know is that a lot of the aristocracy who invited Jews to settle were Protestant. I think they were originally German or of German extraction. I may be wrong.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,385  
22 Oct 2008 /  #6
how did Protestantism get there and stay there, and are they mostly Lutheran (as I'd imagine)?

We have many types, including Lutheran. I have no idea as to their roots.

I imagine they don't pose a threat, due to their relatively small numbers.
osiol 55 | 3,922  
22 Oct 2008 /  #7
I just found a 49 page pdf document all about the introduction of Protestantism to Poland and Bohemia. I skimmed through a few bits of it. That particular story starts in the year 1411 and ends in the early 17th century with persecution and stuff. It doesn't seem to be easy to find anything about this subject.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,385  
22 Oct 2008 /  #8
A search of Wroclaw (protestant churches in Wroclaw) only brings up sites that won't load.

I'll have to come back to this one.
Barney 15 | 1,476  
22 Oct 2008 /  #9
A very interesting article

query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9407E5D8113BE733A25753C2A96 19C946397D6CF - Campaign against Prussian Poland
Krzysztof 2 | 973  
22 Oct 2008 /  #10
I know only that Jerzy Buzek (prime minister 1997-2001) is a Lutheran.
Adam Małysz (Olympic medalist in ski jumping, 4 times World Champion, 4 times winner of the World Cup, 4 times winner of the voting for the best polish athlete, a cult figure in Poland) is Lutheran too.

Józef Piłsudski, "father" of the Polish State (that re-gained the independence in 1918) was born Catholic, but change his religion (in 1899) to marry a Protestant woman.

Mikołaj Rej (or Rey) (1505-1569) - Renaissance poet and writer, "father" of the Polish literature, one of the very first that chose to write in Polish instead of Latin, "co-founder" of Polish literary language (famous for his words "A niechaj narodowie wżdy postronni znają, iż Polacy nie gęsi, iż swój język mają.", translated in Wikipedia as "Let it by all and sundry foreign nations be known that Poles speak not Anserine but a tongue of their own.").

And now searching in Wiki, I found out that one of the most important military figures in Polish Army during the WWII, Gen. Władysław Anders was born Lutheran, but later converted to Catholicism.

Other interesting results from Wikipedia:
Krystyna Janda, one of A. Wajda's favorite actresses (leading role in Man of Iron).
Jerzy Pilch, a popular contemporary writer.
Barney 15 | 1,476  
22 Oct 2008 /  #11
This is one hell of an area.

To stay on topic the whole religious war thing happened. At one stage Lutheran Sweden had a Catholic Polish King. The Polish Nobility were Lutheran, The middle classes were Jewish and no one cared about the rural poor. Loads of other stuff happened but the story (from a very brief reading) is not dissimilar to elsewhere.

It seems indeed that the nobility who encouraged the Jews to settle were protestant when they did so. (Jews had been there for centuries) It then gets just as complicated as it was before.

I can give URL's if anyone is interested. But (unsurprisingly) nothing concise.

Del do you not know this stuff? and why do you ask?
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
22 Oct 2008 /  #12
The only thing I think I know is that a lot of the aristocracy who invited Jews to settle were Protestant.

When Jews were first invited to Poland there was no such thing as protestants.

As for Protestants though, Poland was fairly unique in Europe at in the first decades of the protestant movement. The country was very tolernat of other cultures and religions. Those who found no freedom of thought or faith in other European countries came to Poland, a country with the first ever official charter forbidding religious persecution (introduced in 1573)

Mistake were made later, when Polish quasi-constitution suggested that Poland's kings should be Catholic (so that the king would still have someone above - the pope). That lead to the de facto rule of the RC and we know how the religion of love dealt with those who rejected the pope's rule.
OP Del boy 20 | 254  
23 Oct 2008 /  #13
here you have something about the subject: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_Brethren
Barney 15 | 1,476  
23 Oct 2008 /  #14
z_darius

Nice of you to point that out.

You however missed this bit

"I may be wrong."

And this bit

"It seems indeed that the nobility who encouraged the Jews to settle were protestant when they did so. (Jews had been there for centuries)"

I read a lot of these last night plus other stuff regarding religion and wars and nobility etc. paying attention to dates, names and what I already know.

I'm no expert in this area but I know how to research my pub quiz knowledge.

I'm now going to read allthe words of other posts
Poznan 5 | 46  
23 Oct 2008 /  #15
A very interesting articleCampaign against Prussian Poland

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kulturkampf

Germanisation policies in the Province of Posen mostly failed. Although most of the administrative measures aimed against the Poles remained in force until 1918, between 1912 and 1914 only four Polish-owned estates were expropriated, while at the same time Polish social organizations successfully competed with German trade organizations and even started to buy land from the Germans.The long-lasting effect of the Polish-German conflict in the area was development of a sense of Greater Polish identity, distinct from the identity common in other parts of Poland and primarily associated with nationalist ideas rather than socialism, prevailing in other parts of the country in 20th century.

"It seems indeed that the nobility who encouraged the Jews to settle were protestant when they did so. (Jews had been there for centuries)"

False. It was King Kazimierz long before protestants.

By the way it is strange to talk about protestants and catholics with people from country durring religous war. Look on Northern Irleand.
jonni 16 | 2,485  
23 Oct 2008 /  #16
Adam Małysz

Adam Malysz is from Wisla, which, as far as I know, is the only town in Poland to be majority protestant. There is also a plethora of protestant churches round Lodz, and quite a lot of Jehovah's Witnesses (8000 in Warsaw)

One of the more unusual homegrown protestant churches is the Mariavites (Kosciol Mariawicki) who have very specific beliefs. I think their Cathedral is in Plock, but they have a rather nice new church in Warsaw.
HWPiel 1 | 64  
25 Oct 2008 /  #17
I recently read a statistic, in a source which I cannot cite right now, that Poland was 70% Catholic and 30% other. I am a Lutheran, and I can say with a great degree of certainty that there are not too many of us Polack-Lutherans in America.
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
25 Oct 2008 /  #18
You however missed this bit

If you read my post again you will notice I missed nothing.
Oh, you need to read about Statute of Kalisz (1264) first.
Barney 15 | 1,476  
25 Oct 2008 /  #19
Will do thanks
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
2 Oct 2009 /  #20
I'd love to hear from some Polish Protestants. Us Scots are more aware of the Catholic/Protestant divide. Students here learn the Catechisms but that shouldn't preclude the teaching of Sola Scriptura and other Protestant Reformation texts.
hpackard - | 2  
11 Oct 2009 /  #21
There is a small Czech Brothers community still living in Zelow, not far from Lodz
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
11 Oct 2009 /  #22
I think the problem with this thread is that Polish people likely think it means protesters and not Protestants ;) ;)

Polish Protestants, wow, you are targetting less than 5% of the population here on a forum. Good luck :)

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