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The strangest things in Poland


hello  
17 Nov 2006 /  #31
On a positive note, whenever I go to Poland it seems people are like "one family" (weather there are good or bad connotations with that :). You can start chatting with people in a store or in a bus and it feels you've known them for a long time - everybody has similar problems, watched similar Tv programs etc. It can be boring to see "smiley" faces all the time in the US - being in Poland you have more chances to think about your own life from different perspectives and then you realize your problems are trivial compared to some other people.
krysia 23 | 3,057  
17 Nov 2006 /  #32
I know.
One time I was lost in a wieś somewhere, because there weren't any signs anywhere and didn't know where the heck I was, so I asked for directions and these people were so nice, they would explain over and over in detail how to get to the main road and make sure we would get there. It was a nice feeling.

And the directions were correct also....
hello  
17 Nov 2006 /  #33
Another strange thing - people in Poland go grocery shopping like every day or twice a day. They would go to buy milk and bread in the morning, the next morning or evening they would by some cheese, jam, or sausage. There are many small stores in the areas where they live (even though bigger shopping centers spring up).

In the US people go shopping usually once a week. :)
krysia 23 | 3,057  
18 Nov 2006 /  #34
Yeah. In Poland you have to take the tramwaj or autobus to go to the store and you can't hold on to 10 bags of groceries because you might fall down and spill all the contents and someone might eat your food.

I have to go to sleep now. Good night
Matyjasz 2 | 1,544  
18 Nov 2006 /  #35
Or you can take your car and put your 10 bags of groceries in its trunk. That way you are avoiding the danger of your goods being eaten by a hungry stranger.

There's also another way of dealing with this problem. Buy/rent a flat/house near groceries. :)

3.They have warm milk for lunch breaks. YUK!!!

:) I even eat my cereals with worm milk. :)

4.They start kindergarten at age 6, in the US they start at 5

Not true. Parents are obligated to send their children to kindergarten at the age of 6(it's called "zerówka"), but if you want to and you have the money, there's no problem with sending your little ones earlier. My brother did that. He was sending his daughter to the kindergarten from the age of three. If you let your kid at the kindergarten for 5 hours, you only pay 30zł a month, and the rest is financed by the local authorities. If you want your kid to stay longer, you'll have to pay the whole price form your pocket.

The first thing that I noticed was a strange smell in the air.

What was it?

4. In most schools if you have good marks you are "kujon" (what is English translation?) because of people jelousity... If you have bad marks you are cool... I could never understand that althought I am Polish.

In most primary schools. Such problem doesn't occur in high schools.

It’s same with Korea and Russia. I like it, foot are relaxed, but flour shouldn’t be cold, though.

Exactly. If someone doesn't have a carpet, nor warm slippers for the guests, and still expects them to take off their shoes, than he is just being rude.

In some region of Poland (where there are still some forests left) you will notice country people with their tractors or horses dragging bales of wood (trees) from the local forest before winter starts. You gotta keep the household warm in the winter.

It's illegal to chop off the trees without any permission. There are really big fines for that.
VladG2  
18 Nov 2006 /  #36
In a fast-food restaurant (like Mc Donalds or KFC) you need to order like for two people not to leave hungry. The food portions/sizes are like 40% smaller than in the US.

It's true not only for Poland.
Matyjasz 2 | 1,544  
18 Nov 2006 /  #37
Quoting: i_love_detroit, Post #9
Polish eat potatos with everything... Have a lot of names for potatos, depending on region... (ziemniaki, kartofle, pyry, bulwy, I am sure you have more those are the most popular)

It’s same for Russia, Belorus and Ukraine, too. I like it

Probably a slavic thing. I love pyry!! :)
VladG2  
18 Nov 2006 /  #38
Parents are obligated to send their children to kindergarten at the age of 6(it's called "zerówka")

In Russia we call them "nuliowka"
Matyjasz 2 | 1,544  
18 Nov 2006 /  #39
Null in German means "zero". Is there some kind of relevance between German "null" and Russian "nuliowka"??
VladG2  
18 Nov 2006 /  #40
Exactly. If someone doesn't have a carpet, nor warm slippers for the guests, and still expects them to take off their shoes, than he is just being rude.

I agree.
I take shoes off because I feel more comfortable. For guests usually always propose slippers, although many prefers not to use them.

yes, it is the same
null == zero
nuliowka == zerowka

In Poland you have to take the tramwaj or autobus to go to the store

If you live in city, it's not need to buy ten bags of food at once, just something nearby your home (something good).

ps: Shame on me, I use car, too. Although I'm not living in the city.
lef 11 | 478  
18 Nov 2006 /  #41
Have you noticed when you queue up for something in poland, you may be at the front of the line but as times goes on you slowly progress to the rear..
Matyjasz 2 | 1,544  
18 Nov 2006 /  #42
Nope. And how is that happening lef?
lef 11 | 478  
18 Nov 2006 /  #43
Thats the golden question, how does it happen!
Matyjasz 2 | 1,544  
18 Nov 2006 /  #44
Didn't you know that it's not polite to answer a question with a question, lef?
lef 11 | 478  
18 Nov 2006 /  #45
sorry sir, I was making the point that you would line up in a queue and after a while you seem to be getting further and further from the front...that has been my observation.
VladG2  
18 Nov 2006 /  #46
Thats the golden question, how does it happen!

It's because you don't have an experience to stay in such kind of "queue".
Matyjasz 2 | 1,544  
18 Nov 2006 /  #47
sorry sir, I was making the point that you would line up in a queue and after a while you seem to be getting further and further from the front...that has been my observation.

I forgive you this time, but don't let it happen again. :)

Never happened to me before. Start being more assertive, and you won't have such problem any more. :)
Francesca  
18 Nov 2006 /  #48
Some of the things you describe can relate to anyone who lives in a small flat or house. When you do not have the space for a pantry or cellar to store supplies in you have to shop more often. When you do not have a car and have to carry your stuff on a bus or train you shop more often.

What surprised me was how small the refrigerators where in England - same thing, no room for larger ones so they only kept what would fit. My daughter said the same thing about Poland, no refrigeration and no ice. She hated drinking warm coke in Warsaw... and potatoes and pork everyday, and warm almost hot lettuce/salad.

Depends on how you are brought up, my father was in the military so we had to say Sir and Mamm when we spoke to people, it is only being polite. I am in a Polish Lithuanian renactment group and we use Pan/Pani and whne I tried to write to a young man in Poland and called him Pan he became upset and said that was too formal and no one uses that. I taught my daughter to be polite and she knows when to use it. It is only being respectful and us old folks like it! lol

Warm beer. ugh

I am sorry folks but I like my beer really COLD. After a week in England I got use to asking for a glass of ice with my beer. I would get some strange looks but they would realize I was American and understand. It was funny though.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,387  
18 Nov 2006 /  #49
Matyjasz. post 41,

Is this your sense of humour ? How long does it take to milk a worm ? :)
Matyjasz 2 | 1,544  
18 Nov 2006 /  #50
KO!

:) I was trying to be serious this time, but it looks like I did a complete fool out of myself. :)

Well, not the first and certainly not the last time. :)

I think people should be shoot for selling warm (checked twice the spelling :) ) beer.
That's really is a crime.
FISZ 24 | 2,116  
18 Nov 2006 /  #51
The way they lock their apartments and cars 10 million times

I lock my apartment and car. Everyone around here does. There are tons of thieves and crooks in the tri state area. Even if you're home you'll still get robbed, happenes all the time. We all don't live in Smileyberg...yes it's a real town :) You're lucky to be able to.

They change tires for the winter...

Nobody changes tires for winter in USA

I change my tires every winter. Snow tires improve the ride dramatically. Yes, all season are ok, but I like the difference. My family and a few of my friends also do a winter change. We also go to the mtns. in Vermont a lot to ski/snowboard. In Pl the roads are really icy and rutted.

do not think so... Thwy do not change tires in Detroit either,

I'm sure some people do. You definitely get a lot of snow in MI.

I believe Americans beat Polish in gossiping... Maybe somebody else would speak up.

I'll have to agree that it's very common here. Some people are addicted to these reality shows and soap operas which are nothing but gossip and backstabbing...lame.

What was it?

I'm guessing that it was an odor caused by diesel.
Bartolome 2 | 1,085  
18 Nov 2006 /  #52
I'm guessing that it was an odor caused by diesel.

Probably exhaust gases from town buses, there is developed municipal communication in larger Polish towns (quality of it is another question, though).
i_love_detroit 1 | 69  
18 Nov 2006 /  #53
Quoting: i_love_detroit, Post #9
4. In most schools if you have good marks you are "kujon" (what is English translation?) because of people jelousity... If you have bad marks you are cool... I could never understand that althought I am Polish.

In most primary schools. Such problem doesn't occur in high schools.

You've obviously been to differnt high-school than I. In my high school there was strong pressure not to study from some other students.
dziwna_gruszka - | 197  
18 Nov 2006 /  #54
First off a kujon who studies a lot although may not be intelligent just has good grades because they study a lot and why would you want to be friends with people who want you not to study so they can get ahead and be better at you in school..!!!
krysia 23 | 3,057  
18 Nov 2006 /  #55
OK. Going back to the post.
Churches in Poland don't have bathrooms.
Ha! Who wants to challenge that one!

And that is what I mean about kindergarten - zerówka, they start at age 6.
pre-school they start at age 3.
Cyprian 2 | 69  
18 Nov 2006 /  #56
having to hide my liquor from toy cops when drinking along the wisla in krakow... when 2 blocks away drunks are flossing back whatever they drink.
Syrena_04 2 | 88  
19 Nov 2006 /  #57
Hi Miranda, I don't know what I'm doing in Canada anymore. I need a change. I thought 'to live' but I have not decided yet.
miranda  
19 Nov 2006 /  #58
Hi there, I understand. I have moved accross borders 3 times. Have you lived in Canada all your life?
iwona 12 | 542  
19 Nov 2006 /  #59
There is one thing which is different in Poland -comparing to the west Europe.

it is kind of loaylity....if you have problems with someone at your work in Poland you talk to him first in UK ( for instance) you go to your boss and report it. In Poland we call it "donosiciel" in UK it is completely normal behaviour.

[b]In most schools if you have good marks you are "kujon" (what is English translation?)

I think it is called "teacher pet".

I think that this clapping in the plane is very american thing - I mean it is done mainly by Polish travelling to USA and back.

I never noticed it on any diifferent flights.
Amathyst 19 | 2,702  
19 Nov 2006 /  #60
I am sorry folks but I like my beer really COLD. After a week in England I got use to asking for a glass of ice with my beer. I would get some strange looks but they would realize I was American and understand. It was funny though.

Im English and never had warm beer.

I cant really honestly think of anything I found strange in Poland - oh actually one thing, if I receive service off a Polish person in the UK its exceptionally good, but in Poland it was dire

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