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The strangest things in Poland


iwona 12 | 542  
22 Nov 2006 /  #91
Maybe I used wrong expression in the first place.... when I started it.

My mum also worked ( she had to ) was independedent and at the same time was the best mum on the world.

I meant about these women who don't have much of their all life, interest, who devot themselves too much for children and don't let them to grow up as they always want to look after them, always help financially.... Maybe better expression would be "kwoki"
FISZ 24 | 2,116  
22 Nov 2006 /  #92
I've forgotten something. I find it strange that I couldn't find a clothes dryer anywhere. So much for the last min cleaning and drying.
iwona 12 | 542  
22 Nov 2006 /  #93
they are not very popular in Poland. I don't know why? Mayge because of the cost of electricity?

My cousin who lives in USA always moan about it in Poland.
her dryer is great you don't have to iron clothes.
FISZ 24 | 2,116  
22 Nov 2006 /  #94
Yeah...they come in very handy at times. I hear that not may other countries in Europe use them.
iwona 12 | 542  
22 Nov 2006 /  #95
no, maybe it is just culture and....I suppose room for it.

In USA houses are in general bigger with basements so there is more room for dryer.
krysia 23 | 3,057  
22 Nov 2006 /  #96
The rings get me confused.
OK. when engaged in Poland, the ring is on left hand on the woman. But when she marries it gets moved to the right hand?

And do guys wear their wedding band on the right hand?
is that correct? Do all Polish people follow that rule?
In the US everything is on the left hand.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,387  
22 Nov 2006 /  #97
Right hand for wedding rings. Men and women
krysia 23 | 3,057  
22 Nov 2006 /  #98
So, when a married Polish woman comes to America, guys will think she's single, because she doesn't have a ring on her left hand.

Confusing!
BubbaWoo 33 | 3,510  
22 Nov 2006 /  #99
Right hand for wedding rings. Men and women

so confusing... i always get asked if im married...
Syrena_04 2 | 88  
22 Nov 2006 /  #100
All the best...

Thanks Miranda. I appreciate the info. I will continue my Polish lessons for now and see where life takes me.

All the best to you.
krysia 23 | 3,057  
22 Nov 2006 /  #101
OK. So when Polish married people come to the US, do they change the placement of their rings?
I gonna find out tomorrow, because I'm invited to some Polish people for thanksgiving dinner and I'm gonna check and glance at her hand and see where she wears it.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,387  
22 Nov 2006 /  #102
I would think not.
krysia 23 | 3,057  
22 Nov 2006 /  #103
When and if I get married again, I'm keeping it on my left hand, because I'm right handed and it would always be in the way.

What's strange in Poland is that women in stores sit at the cash register.
I've heard poles call medium size clothes "emki", small - "eski", Large - "elki"
The door-knobs are round
The hot water is on the right marked with red.
iwona 12 | 542  
23 Nov 2006 /  #104
I think in Poland wedding ring is on right hand but when woman's husband dies she moves it on left hand. I don't know if people still do it but older generations did.
Varsovian 92 | 634  
23 Nov 2006 /  #105
Wearing my wedding ring on my right hand took me a bit of getting used to - then I ditched it because it just kept on getting in the way!

What I find strange is how younger people round where I live are so much more polite than the miserable oldies. I go for a lot of walks along a path on which cyclists go - when I get out of the way for an oldie they almost never say thank you. There seems to be a cut-off point aroung 45 where Poles become old grumps (and, coincidentally, seem unable to drive without aggression or in a straight line).
casper  
23 Nov 2006 /  #106
that probably cause they are pissed!:)
iwona 12 | 542  
23 Nov 2006 /  #107
What I find strange is how younger people round where I live are so much more polite than the miserable oldies. I go for a lot of walks along a path on which cyclists go - when I get out of the way for an oldie they almost never say thank you. There seems to be a cut-off point aroung 45 where Poles become old grumps (and, coincidentally, seem unable to drive without aggression or in a straight line).

That is true and so diferent to UK . I find in UK older people nice, friendly and cheerful.
Lots of young people are rude, loud, mumbling no speaking and with very little manners. I could only suspect it is partly result of Blair politics.
miranda  
23 Nov 2006 /  #108
I will continue my Polish lessons for now and see where life takes me.

No problem. How are those lessons going?
Mitffoch  
27 Nov 2006 /  #109
Couple strange things in Poland:
1. Drafts. Any air movement in the appartment/house is considered deadly.
2. Strange combination of foods are considered poisonous. For example: no water after eating apples or pears....things like this. Any milk products after meat - certain death.

I remember these things when I was kid living in Poland, but when I visit once in a while, they are still there.
FISZ 24 | 2,116  
29 Nov 2006 /  #110
Any milk products after meat - certain death

Oh boze. I had farm made kielbasa and a glass of milk one morning... I felt sick all day. Definitely not recommended.
Varsovian 92 | 634  
29 Nov 2006 /  #111
Milk is rightly seen as bad for you in Poland.
It's for small kids only.

For older people, well, where do I start?
Saturated fat - bad
Casein - that's used in glue (skin on top of heated milk)
Insulin-like growth factor 1 - implicated in breast and prostate cancer
Calcium - implicated in causing prostate cancer and OSTEOPOROSIS (yup - you heard me right: calcium is BAD for your bones)

But it's good for little kids though - milk is designed for infant mammals. What a surprise, that one. I mean, when was the last time you saw an adult woman attempting to breastfeed from another except in some rather late night movie?
bolo 2 | 304  
3 Dec 2006 /  #112
I was sometimes amused when I was in Polish banks or Polish post offices and saw guys wearing guard/police suits and showing their pistols. It seems every bank in Poland has its own private guard/s. Like in the cowboy movies. Sometimes they are not real guards, though - they are relatives of the bank's manager etc. But that's life... :)
krysia 23 | 3,057  
3 Dec 2006 /  #113
showing their pistols

they were either:
1. water pistols
2. something else
bolo 2 | 304  
3 Dec 2006 /  #114
Actually, I only managed to see the butt. But I imagine it's easy for a woman to picture something else too. :).
Wroclaw 44 | 5,387  
3 Dec 2006 /  #115
Some of these firearms are real. Others fire gas or gas fired pellets. Either way they will make a mess of you.
Eurola 4 | 1,906  
3 Dec 2006 /  #116
Did you know that here in USA some older folks are taking a bus to go the electrical company headquaters to pay their electric bill as well as to gas company to pay their gas bill? :)
jasiu  
3 Dec 2006 /  #117
yeah - we have some older folk who take buses in the uk too... some of them also walk and drive cars...

i saw one ride a bicycle the other day but i dont know where they were going... it might have been to pay their gas bill... i didnt ask...

my parents... who i guess are old folks... to an airplane the the other week... but that was to go on holiday... not pay their bills...
krysia 23 | 3,057  
3 Dec 2006 /  #118
jasiu... you are soooooooooo funny!!!!!!!!

a wood-tick was riding my dog to get to the woods, but not to pay the gas bill.
jasiu  
3 Dec 2006 /  #119
facetious at times... i do apologise...
miranda  
3 Dec 2006 /  #120
Krysia - I thought I was hallucinating!!!!Bad girl

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