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Polish people living in Poland, How do you see your future?


lef 11 | 478  
16 Jan 2007 /  #1
I am interested in hearing from people born in Poland, who have not lived overseas, your view, concerns and dreams about your future? Are things getting better or worse?

Do you want to work in another country?
hello 22 | 891  
16 Jan 2007 /  #2
I think most Polish people who post here are immigrants. I know many people who want to leave Poland for work - and it seems to be "normal" nowadays. Nobody in Poland would be surprised if you told them you're going to go to Germany/UK or other EU country to work.
ick  
7 Feb 2007 /  #3
how many People living in Poland??
BubbaWoo 33 | 3,510  
7 Feb 2007 /  #4
significantly less than a couple of years ago
daffy 23 | 1,508  
7 Feb 2007 /  #5
its 38million as at entry to EU according to europa.eu
wonski81 - | 22  
7 Feb 2007 /  #6
I think most Polish people who post here are immigrants

You're right. I am one of them, but I visit Poland very regurarly.
Thing are getting better, but not really. It is much easier to find job in Poland - whether You are proffesional, or not. Unfortunately salary is still to low for all proffesions. That's why young Poles still prefer to go west rather than trying to jump on ladder in Poland.

The big problem is that large part of them do not have degree, and will not have, apparently.
Most of my collegues are 18-21, no degree, no English but they enjoy UK, money,money and money.
It is very easy to buy them, to reduce their willing for personal development.
At the same time young people living in Poland are doing their best to improve their knowledge and education as much as it is possible, despite difficulties like money, lack of time caused by low paid work.

I hope that these brave young in Poland will finally win the battle, and strongly believe that their choice will be rewarded.
Personally I'm thinking about jojning them soon, but still working here to get qualifications, and experience necessary to start living in Poland again.
The only reason I'm here, in UK is that Poland didn't give me chance to show what I can, the reason why I'm going back is that I am able to show them what I can, eventually.
krysia 23 | 3,057  
7 Feb 2007 /  #7
I think most Polish people who post here are immigrants

Yes, I'm a Polish immigrant. Born in USA.
eabc 1 | 28  
7 Feb 2007 /  #8
am interested in hearing from people born in Poland, who have not lived overseas, your view, concerns and dreams about your future? Are things getting better or worse?
Do you want to work in another country?

I came back to Poland after some time in UK and after 3 months I found a job finally. E.g. in UK I found after 3 days. So it isn't easy in Poland.

I don't know what will be with Poland, but I have bad feelings because the prices goes up and salaries not really.
And what I will do I don't know.. might be I will go warm Australia :)
misiek242  
1 May 2007 /  #9
Hi!

I live in Poland in Wroclaw - city of hope and city of new possibilities. But i must say that finding a job is still a problem in my home town. I'm student of Wroclaw University of Technology - faculty of electronics,field of study : computer science (extramular studies). This is my final year of studies. Unfortunately I have been to many interviews in Wroclaw and all employers still demand and demand from new workes a lot of experience (I'll add that most of interviews were in English). I have to admit that i do not have it many in IT field.Only 1,5 year as a computer service worker and help-desk, whole rest is not IT experience ,currently I work at WABCO Poland (Automotive). I'm still thinking of working in England for example, because I know that I can find a job there as a beginner, maybe my salary won't be great at the beginning, but I'll have the chance to get this very important experience. And maybe later as the experienced worker I'll find better job with better salary - what won't be possible in Poland in my home town.

Best Regards

Michael W.
Edyta - | 9  
1 May 2007 /  #10
I live in Krakow since I was born and I don't see my future in black colour. Yes, I admit, I would like to find a job for holidays somewhere abroad, because I have some dreams. I'd like to build my own house which is unavailable for a student or just after studies. As a teacher at primary school I will be able to earn about 700 zł monthly for a few years. 6 weeks of work in Holland last holidays gave my boyfriend 10 000 zł... so you can see the difference. I think many Poles work abroad because they want to earn more, not because they can't find a job here. If you really want to work you will find job, really.

So, maybe I'm going to work abroad this summer (if I find a job ;-)) but I really couldn't leave Poland for longer, forever. I have my family here, my friends, my memories, my favourite places, my dog, my cats... all my life is here. Poles ale devoted to where they live. In US people often change a job, a house (I heard so). Here, if you build a house you can be sure that many generations of your sons and grandsons will live in it, too. People often start a job at the age of 18 and don't change it until they retire. Ofcourse, things are changing now but it's still quite usual way of living.

I'm a Polish teacher, when I finish my studies I'm going to teach foreigners so well, I will probably have to work abroad. It was a kind of decision when I was choosing these studies but I can't imagine not living in Poland. I can go abroad for a year or two, but my heart will be here, I'm sure.

And about situation in Poland - I believe it's getting better, especially after joining EU. I know our government now is... well... let's say it would be better if there wasn't any. No government would be better that this one :-) Their ideas are stupid and destroying Poland and its future but I hope they can't spoilt everything.

There are many good changes in Polish everyday life. Everything is getting more and more expensive, that's right, but salaries grow, too (9% this year, am I right?). There are more companies who decide to employ young people, even without experience (they train them themselves). If you are ready to learn new things and really want to work you will find a job (as you can see, I don't agree with Misiek242 :-)) The problem is that Poles like to complain about everything and not to do anything to change their situation.

I don't know what else you would like to know...

Buziaki :-)
Edyta
Peanut  
1 May 2007 /  #11
I think most Polish people who post here are immigrants.

What are you talking about? I live in Poland and I am going nowhere!

significantly less than a couple of years ago

Yeah, but many only WORK in other countries. They still live in Poland
szarlotka 8 | 2,209  
1 May 2007 /  #12
The problem is that Poles like to complain about everything

Very true in my experience. I used to think that nobody could touch us Brits at the top of the world class moaning list but I think the Poles could give us a run for our money <insert smiley face here>

Joking aside I thought Edyta's post was spot on. Poland is only three years on into a major transition. As time goes on things will improve. Without being patronising , I hope, just look at the Irish economy now compared with 15-20 years ago. Polish entrepreneurs will emerge and as I have said many times here the well educated and hard working Polish workforce will do well. Polish management skills will develop further and within 10-15 years you will all be wondering what the fuss was about.
BubbaWoo 33 | 3,510  
1 May 2007 /  #13
I'm a Polish teacher, when I finish my studies I'm going to teach foreigners so well, I will probably have to work abroad.

i imagine that more and more people will be coming to poland for a week or two to learn the language and enjoy what the country has to offer - i did two weeks at the sopot school of polish last month and was suprised at the number of different nationalities there.

the school is small, but growing rapidly, and students were there because they had moved to poland to be with their partner, or were working with poles back home, or wanted to do business in poland, or any number of reasons...

with an understanding of how the overseas language travel industry works, and a thoughtout marketing strategy, i believe that an enterprising polish language teacher could do very well for themselves without having to leave the country...

They still live in Poland

youre obviously to stupid to realise whats happening around you
ukinpoland 5 | 338  
1 May 2007 /  #14
Yeah, but many only WORK in other countries. They still live in Poland,

That brings a whole new meaning to the word commuter. Forget a trip down the M4 they get on the next lifght from Warsaw to London every day. Lucky ******* imagine all the frequent flier points they will be getting.
szarlotka 8 | 2,209  
1 May 2007 /  #15
Lucky ******* imagine all the frequent flier points they will be getting

Yep. I had three years of weekly commuting to Warsaw. Loads of air miles and getting the 6.50am flight on a Monday morning meant that commute was only marginally longer than the average trip into London in rush hour. Damned sight more fun too.
Peanut  
1 May 2007 /  #16
London

LOL. England is not the only country in Europe where Poles works, you know. My friends comeback for every weekend from Germany, Netherland and Belgium. And You know what? They got two or three apartments each by now.
ukinpoland 5 | 338  
1 May 2007 /  #17
And You know what? They got two or three apartments each by now

Looks like everyone is doing a lot better than you then.
LoneStranger 3 | 382  
1 May 2007 /  #18
I am a Pole, born in Poland... look to be here in the future aswell.

I think Poland has a bright future.

Sometimes I feel... I am the only Polish living in Poland here.... but then... its good that way too :)
TheKruk 3 | 308  
3 May 2007 /  #19
I am an American living and working in Poland , I have a Polish wife and baby.
I teach young people English and my message is always: see what its like somewhere else make a little money and learn how different Governements and businesses are run, then come home and change Poland. I am hopeful for poland because I see young talented highly educated people everyday, they just are disenchanted by a government that appears to not care about solving polands problems. As idealistic and perhaps unrealistic as it may sound, Do Not Give Up. I have a Polska Walczonca tattoo on my shoulder to always remind me of the Poles who struggled against all odds in W.W. II that no matter what, you must try to fight rather than give in roll over and die. Look to your grandparents for that spirit and find it in yourselves young Poland! You will win!
joey  
3 May 2007 /  #20
I am polish living in London. i have been here for about three years now.

First time i went back home ( after a year or so) , all my friends were moaning about how they will never find a job and there is no future for them, and nothing good will ever happen .

Well 2 years later they all have managed somehow to finish their studies and get a job. Yes, they are not rolling in money , but they are not living the streets like they thought they would.

The problem is we cannot see anyting but ourselves and our hardship and there is so many countries that are so much worse off than us. This is why i believe that is extremly important for young people to travel and gain some knowlege and perpective, see how other people live and what we can chenge in our coun try but also what we shoul come to terms with because some things are reallly not as bad as we make them out
BubbaWoo 33 | 3,510  
3 May 2007 /  #21
is extremly important for young people to travel and gain some knowlege and perpective, see how other people live

good point joey - you have obviously gained from the experience
Giles  
3 May 2007 /  #22
The problem is we cannot see anyting but ourselves and our hardship and there is so many countries that are so much worse off than us.

sense at last...well done..very good point.
OP lef 11 | 478  
7 May 2007 /  #23
Thanks for all your responses, I posted this post back in January this year and have just returned from a lightening visit to Poland, I've come back with mixed emotions about my visit and can see the positives and negatives about life in Poland in the future.

What comes to mind is that Poland has a rich culture and history, and its people are genuine and friendly. Its young excel in academics and are well educated and Polish girls are the prettiest in the world. Unfortunately Poland produces very little products which attract the export market, ie Germany has a lot to offer (everything from cars to washing machines)

The second wild card is current wage and salaries offered to Polish workers. I know some Polish people earn a lot of money, but the average Polish worker would be lucky to bring home 2000zl a month. Cost are cheaper in Poland than Australia but not in every area..(petrol cost 2.8zl a litre in Oz as compared to Poland approx 4.8zl)

I think it will take a long time before wages in Poland equal to that of the west.

In regard to real estate, prime real estate in Poland will continue to grow, but I can foresee a major correction to prices in the outer suburban areas.

Investors are probably better off going countries like Romania or Bulgaria to secure a better return.
Some people still think that properties will increase by 50% in the next year, these people should put there money where there mouth is and start buying up, I won't because there are too many factors that point the other way.

One person told me that you won't buy a house for less than 1M zl, well hello, what person living in Poland could even dream about such a proposition. I told one person if he had that sort of money he should come to Oz and buy a investment property there, it would make better sense.
witek 1 | 587  
7 May 2007 /  #24
One person told me that you won't buy a house for less than 1M zl, well hello, what person living in Poland could even dream about such a proposition

my friend's mother got an offer of $3,000,000 zl for her mansion outside of Warsaw but turned it down as it was not enough $$$
hello 22 | 891  
7 May 2007 /  #25
$3,000,000 zl

3 million US-zlotych?

I don't believe the hype either (wheather in Poland or the US). Some people brag about making huge money in the real estate, but in fact what you really make is up to 10% a year at best. Putting money in bank account I get almost 6% sure money.
witek 1 | 587  
7 May 2007 /  #26
3 million zl or approx. 1 million USD

sorry i made a mistake

3 million PLN = $1,088,315.70 USD

1 USD = 2.75655 PLN

the U.S. dollar is dropping like a stone
hello 22 | 891  
7 May 2007 /  #27
the U.S. dollar is dropping like a stone

True. Does it change in any way the lives of people in Poland? I would say those who live in the US don't send so many "presents" they used to in the past to their relatives in Poland.
OP lef 11 | 478  
7 May 2007 /  #28
Well if somebody told you your relative had a property worth 1 Million Zlote would you bother!, You would ask them to send you a few parcels.

my friend's mother got an offer of $3,000,000 zl for her mansion outside of Warsaw but turned it down as it was not enough $$$

Don't doubt that, "mansions" will always attract a good buyer.
Some people are trying to sell you run down homes and tell you to do it up, biggest mistake you can make, best start from new with new technology, a lot of old homes have rot and are not worth doing up. The red tape and taxation is a bit of a worry when doing business in Poland (it can only improve)
hello 22 | 891  
7 May 2007 /  #29
Well if somebody told you your relative had a property worth 1 Million Zlote would you bother!

But some of them still expect the immigrants to send parcels to Poland (at least this is a slogan by the biggest shipping company between US and PL).

I agree with the "mansions" - it's going to cost twice as much to renovate them than to build it from scratch. If I was to build a mansion, I wouldn't care about the location - as long as there's enough land.
witek 1 | 587  
7 May 2007 /  #30
still expect the immigrants to send parcels to Poland

usually people send $$$. but with the U.S. dollar = 2.75 zl , then the money you send is not worth as much as it was before.

my friend's mother got an offer of $3,000,000 zl for her mansion outside of Warsaw but turned it down as it was not enough $$$

people in Poland are becoming millionares. the time to buy property in Poland was in the early 1990's. one man i know bought resedential land in the early 1990's in a city and divided it into over 300 lots that he is now selling.

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