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Catholic Church services in Poland


Qacer 38 | 125  
16 Jul 2007 /  #1
Are the Catholic masses in Poland structured like the ones in America?

I've only observed Catholic masses in two countries: America and the Philippines. In the Philippines, people greet each other during the peace greeting portion by looking at each other and bowing their heads. In the US, people greet each other by shaking their hands.

Also, when I go for communion I normally say "amen" after receiving the bread. Is there a Polish word for this?

Another thing, when the "Our Father" part comes, all parishioners hold hands. In the Philippines, I remember people just sticking their hands out as if they were receiving the Holy Spirit. I wonder what parishioners do in Poland.

Lastly, what times during Sunday are mass services shorter than usual? If I had the chance here in the US, I would go as early as possible to avoid extra songs normally injected during midday services.

Thanks!
annab3 1 | 16  
17 Jul 2007 /  #2
Are the Catholic masses in Poland structured like the ones in America?

basically yes

In the Philippines, people greet each other during the peace greeting portion by looking at each other and bowing their heads.

used to be the same in Poland in most places. Now, there may be exceptions as Polish people love to imitate Americans

Also, when I go for communion I normally say "amen" after receiving the bread. Is there a Polish word for this?

Amen it is. I believe it is from Latin or Greek or Hebrew (who knows at this point) and pretty much the same in most languages

when the "Our Father" part comes, all parishioners hold hands. In the Philippines, I remember people just sticking their hands out as if they were receiving the Holy Spirit. I wonder what parishioners do in Poland.

In Poland they don't do any of that. But see the first comment.

what times during Sunday are mass services shorter than usual?

shame on you ;)), but the following is true

go as early as possible to avoid extra songs normally injected during midday services

If you are going to a Polish mass, just follow what people do. We tend to kneel more than Americans (on the good note), but tend to push our way trough to receive the Communion (on the bad note, as though there was not enough for everyone).

And be prepared to pray in Polish ;))
OP Qacer 38 | 125  
18 Jul 2007 /  #3
Thanks! If I don't learn any prayers in Polish any time soon, I'll just do what I do here. I'll just move my mouth without saying anything. It works every time. :)
dondonf - | 14  
9 Oct 2007 /  #4
basically the same structure
that should be the essence of the mass....it should be the same in any church around the world

In the Philippines, I remember people just sticking their hands out as if they were receiving the Holy Spirit. I wonder what parishioners do in Poland.

what I have learned is that raising up your hands high up should be done only by the priests, these is an act of collecting the prayers of the people and offering it to God...what the congregation can do was to lift his hand in an offertory gesture(symbolizing offering of prayers)...as for the parishioners holding hands, i can see more Filipinos doing this practice (until the SARS scare), to symbolize a one family with One God the Father
nfrye - | 1  
21 Sep 2008 /  #5
Are there English speaking masses in Gdansk?
Any suggested contacts to find English speaking mass?
Thanks!
pawian 179 | 16,308  
22 Sep 2008 /  #6
Are the Catholic masses in Poland structured like the ones in America?

I guess so. Roman Catholic masses should go accordin to one pattern throughout the whole world. If not, they are not Roman Cathoilic anymore, but sth else.

I've only observed Catholic masses in two countries: America and the Philippines. In the Philippines, people greet each other during the peace greeting portion by looking at each other and bowing their heads. In the US, people greet each other by shaking their hands.

In Poland you can do both - most people bow heads, but some shake hands. So, if your neighbour extends his/her hand to you, don`t feel surprised.

Also, when I go for communion I normally say "amen" after receiving the bread. Is there a Polish word for this?

No. It is the same amen.
One more remark: you receive bread in your mouth, not into hand, in Poland.

Another thing, when the "Our Father" part comes, all parishioners hold hands. In the Philippines, I remember people just sticking their hands out as if they were receiving the Holy Spirit. I wonder what parishioners do in Poland.

Most do nothing, just stand, but some priests request people to raise their hands.

Lastly, what times during Sunday are mass services shorter than usual? If I had the chance here in the US, I would go as early as possible to avoid extra songs normally injected during midday services.

Each parish has different hours. In my church it is 11 o clock, in others 12. SO, eaxch church requires an individual approach.

When was the last time you went to a mass in Poland??? :):):)
Lodz_The_Boat 32 | 1,535  
22 Sep 2008 /  #7
Latin or Greek or Hebrew

Its Aramic ... which now is Arabic.
Switezianka - | 463  
22 Sep 2008 /  #8
Hebrew. It's even used in Jewish liturgy :P

There's one funny thing about Polish masses, but, I don't know, maybe it's done everywhere...

When the priest takes the bread or the cup and raises it to show it to the congregation, people bow heir heads and look at the floor instead of of looking at what is shown to them.
Rakky 9 | 217  
22 Sep 2008 /  #9
I find this odd, considering that this is the "miracle" that supposedly takes place during the mass. What I find even odder is that those who claim to believe this miracle don't make more of an effort to witness it more often than weekly (if that). I think if I really believed that was happening, I'd be there every day to witness and take part in it.
yehudi 1 | 433  
24 Sep 2008 /  #10
Its Aramic ... which now is Arabic.

"Amen" is pure Hebrew. It occurs in Pslams, which was written before the Babylonian exile, so it's unlikely to be Aramaic. But the two languages do have words in common.

"Hallelujah" is also Hebrew.

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