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American moving to Poland


Guest  
24 Jul 2006 /  #1
My boyfriend lived in the US for a year but now lives back home in Poland and I am considering living in Poland just to be with him. But the problem is what job would I get when I don't know the language. Also that I would like to go to college there. I am planning to visit there for 2 months then make my decision. Are there many Americans in Poland?
IndianPolishGurl  
24 Jul 2006 /  #2
I am American born... Im going to be living there in the future. I know how to speak Polish, but im still learning how to write lol...

Jobs... how old are you and what are your qualifications? Depending on this, if you learn the basic one year of Polish language... you could become a teacher of English... also if u go to college, depending where u r going to go but in Warszawa (Warsaw) University there has courses in English and a lot of Americans are in fact there....
bolo 2 | 304  
25 Jul 2006 /  #3
Guest
I assume you are a student, aren't you? Yes, there are many Americans in Poland - especially in big cities like Warsaw, Krakow, or Poznan. There are also quite a few international and good universities that are approved world-wide. Note that studying in Poland isn't as "easy" as in the US - the professors are more strict and you would have to spend some good time studying and learning the material. I'm sure you will do just fine, but yes - it's a wise decision to go there for a couple of months to find out if it's for you.

Also, it would be good for us to know which are / province he lives to determine if it's a good region for study or work.
OP Guest  
26 Jul 2006 /  #4
I am 19 years old, I will be starting my second year of college this fall. I plan to visit Poland for a month this winter and also a month next summer. I could become a English teacher like IndianPolishGirl was saying, or I really don't know what else, any other ideas? Should I finish out my 2 last years of school in U.S or there in a University in Poland? He lives in Kielce. Thanks for the information, any more would be helpful :)
robersts  
26 Jul 2006 /  #5
bolo
'Note that studying in Poland isn't as "easy" as in the US - the professors are more strict and you would have to spend some good time studying and learning the material. '

are you suggesting you do not have to learn wherever you are
bolo 2 | 304  
26 Jul 2006 /  #6
are you suggesting you do not have to learn wherever you are

I'm suggesting that it takes more time and effort to graduate from a Polish university than from the American one. The Polish educational system is much more strict and difficult than the American one - I learned something in the primary school in Poland while in the US they teach the same in college...
Wujek_Dobra_Rada  
26 Jul 2006 /  #7
Here, if you`re studying at an university - you have to memorize a lot - and i.e. during exams you aren`t allowed to use any books (unlike i.e. in Harvard...) You simply have to know everything out of your head. I don`t know how it looks in case of foreign students - but here you aren`t allowed to choose classes - you have to take all classes. The professors here, during the first 3 years are often extreamly strict - becaouse they want to dispose the students that aren`t performing well as well as they want to teach people discipline that is needed during the real life - the last two years are yeasier - though during that time you have to write your masters thesis.

I'm suggesting that it takes more time and effort to graduate from a Polish university than from the American one. The Polish educational system is much more strict and difficult than the American one - I learned something in the primary school in Poland while in the US they teach the same in college...

This is the result of the totally degraded highschool system in the US - an average American, who graduated highschool - and only highschool, if he wants to know anything about the world, history, or some other things, like how to repair the electrical instalation in his house, has to read a lot of books i.e. as his hobby - becaouse if he wouldn`t do that he wouldn`t know almost anything about those issues. I know a couple of such Americans - who are really smart - in my opinion they could very well study at an university - but after graduating a substandard highschool (and not having much money) they didn`t had any chance for a better life.
Pavlos  
26 Jul 2006 /  #8
I could become a English teacher like IndianPolishGirl was saying, or I really don't know what else, any other ideas?

I strongly suggest you to finish your school in the US. It would probably be hard for you to accommodate to the Polish school system in such a short time. You would probably have to go to a school where English is the first language (eg. teaching college/university). But note - I used to go to such school in Poland and it is not easy - especially the language theory part where you have to learn very difficult terms. I never graduated from this school (I wanted to take two courses at the same time and had to give one up). Even if you get a job, it will most likely be not enough money for you to get comfortable living and studying. Kielce is on the East of Poland where there is the highest unemployment rate. Warsaw or Krakow would definately give you more opportunities as far as your professional life is concerned. You could become a native English speaker/tutor there (for example). I doubt you would get a lot of prospective clients in Kielce.

Either way, I wish you good luck! After the two months in Poland you will definately have a better idea of the "real world" in Poland.
opts 10 | 260  
1 Aug 2006 /  #9
Guest
My boyfriend lived in the US for a year but now lives back home in Poland and I am considering living in Poland just to be with him. But the problem is what job would I get when I don't know the language. Also that I would like to go to college there. I am planning to visit there for 2 months then make my decision. Are there many Americans in Poland?

Stay in US, if you want to have a future.
Your boyfriend went back to Poland.
Perhaps, he is more special to you, than you are to him.
Open your eyes. :)
lef 11 | 478  
1 Aug 2006 /  #10
There are many jobs in the country, strawberry picking and work on farms,,
Wujek_Dobra_Rada  
2 Aug 2006 /  #11
Stay in US, if you want to have a future.
Your boyfriend went back to Poland.
Perhaps, he is more special to you, than you are to him.
Open your eyes.

Ofcourse she would find a job and she would be able to attend an university if she would be able to communicate in Polish.

If not then she could get a standard job that is being offered for English speakers here - she could work as a native speaker.. or an English tourist guide (if Ukrainians can do it then I see no reason why an American wouldn`t able to do the same)
opts 10 | 260  
2 Aug 2006 /  #12
Is that type of work beneath your dignity? a job is a job.

In US, illegal aliens, Mexicans and other Latin Americans do that type of work.
It is least desirable work, pay is minimal.
lef 11 | 478  
3 Aug 2006 /  #13
Quoting: lef, Post #29
Is that type of work beneath your dignity? a job is a job.

In US, illegal aliens, Mexicans and other Latin Americans do that type of work.
It is least desirable work, pay is minimal.

you never know, you have to start on the bottom and work yourself up, never know being from the US, you will be a manager in a short period of time.
FISZ 24 | 2,116  
3 Aug 2006 /  #14
In US, illegal aliens, Mexicans and other Latin Americans do that type of work.
It is least desirable work, pay is minimal.

Well, believe it or not the Mexicans that work in our farms make more money than most food preparation jobs. The average according to the AFBF(American Farm Bureau Federation) is $9.50 - $14.35 Per hr which is more than minimum wage. In Florida some illegals are making up to $20 for harvesting tobacco. But, they're the only ones that want to do this type of job. The families in Mexico are living well wile we pay for their health care when they get sick.
JustinDT  
10 Aug 2006 /  #15
Good luck with the work permit. Seems to be the toughest part.
lef 11 | 478  
19 Aug 2006 /  #16
Guess has better employment opportunities in US.

Depends where you best feel at home, strawberry picking is only an example, most people who settled in oz from poland had labouring type work, mainly because of language problems still lived a good lifestyle, their children reaped the benefits. Apart from myself very few people of polish parents here, would consider returning to poland to live pernamently.

Unfortuanately most people want a highly paid job form day 1, you have to build up to it.

There used to be a saying that goes, work in america and spend in poland that dosn't work anymore..

lef it is so nice to hear from you again.i thought that my little joke about australia putt you off that forum and u failed to see the funny side of it

Thanks rafik, thanks for your trust and support, I do get a bit feed up when I hear so much nonsense from a few people who seem to have hijacked this forum.. Nothing but there bigoted opinions seem to count.. You would think that you were living in Soviet Russian during Stalinist times or Germany in the 30's in how they respond to a different point of view.

Some peoples definition of democracy is an opportunity to make money, it should be the ability to allow somebody to speak his or her mind.

I certainly want to give polish people sound advice (as per previous posts) and am able to offer sound advice of anything to do with oz land.

Thanks rafik for showing your concerns.
eeel  
6 Aug 2008 /  #17
my wife is from poland, we have a 6month old. I currently make $60,000 a year and a have a associates degree in Liberal Arts. She wants to move to poland and i am a bit weary. bad Idea?
Svenski 1 | 159  
6 Aug 2008 /  #18
Seriously doubt you can make $60,000/yr there ..unless you have a thriving business.
leopardkitty  
8 Nov 2008 /  #19
hey! it was so cool to see your inquiries on this forum. I am 19 too, in college and I have a boyfriend who lives and studies in Poland. I want to transfer my studies to Poland, but am having lots of troubles doing that. My boyfriend lives in the city right next to Kielce! I have been to Kielce many times. I spent a year in Poland after i got out of highschool and i got really home sick and frustrated because i didn't know the language well enough. if you go to the the polish embassy website(the one for the embassy in DC) there is a link: all you need to know about studying in poland and has a list of schools where an amercan can study. unfortunatley i don't like any of the schools that are available, i am studying art in richmond, va
Switezianka - | 463  
8 Nov 2008 /  #20
I wouldn't recommend moving to Poland before graduation. Native speaker teachers are usually required to have a higher education (doesn't matter what). In case of other jobs available with secondary education - I can't think of any in which speaking Polish is not necessary, that would be enough to survive.

As an English teacher, lecturer or a manager in a company, one may work in Poland without the knowledge of Polish. But without higher ed, only manual jobs are left - not a very good prospect, is it? The payment is not enough to rent a flat, and pay for food, so it makes one financially dependent on someone else.
stilwtrjen 2 | 18  
9 Nov 2008 /  #21
My husband's job has brought us to Poland (arrived Aug 4 this yr). His company would be a great one for Americans to work because even the polish speak english there. However, it is in Warszawa. The language is difficult to learn but we are working on it. What I wanted to contribute is that from what we have been able to see, unless you have a higher position at any company, you do not make enough money to pay your bills. Rent/real estate is high here (for a decent place) as is most of cost of living. Even some of the people in his office who have college degrees (and some masters) barely make enough to pay their rent and utilities.... We met a cashier in a store who speaks great english and had lived in the US for about 8 yrs or so. He came back here because his girlfriend wanted to come back. But he is planning on going back to the US as soon as possible as he is working 2-3 jobs just to pay his bills here. Maybe that's just my small scope over 3 months time, but I hope it helps!
AmericanGirl - | 20  
12 Nov 2008 /  #22
Hey stilwtrjen. I'm an American living in Warsaw. I've been living/working here for over two years and I'm just curious about your husbands company. If you don't mind sharing, could you please send me a PM. I must agree that rent and the cost of living is high and the salaries barely make ends meet.
existercom - | 1  
12 Nov 2008 /  #23
in usa there is a school deficit or what mayb here we have better stuff to work on it like electrone microscope i saw once, and mayb here is some secret communitie wich works at some dangerous stuff could dammage area, cause suffering here( when uour american u just could not have any ocassion to learn living here and have fun, as u have at own country} i can see only as absolutely pointless, of course if the reason isnot so serious to move here and b american in poland wich has american attractions smiley small in a relation to what u like at continent. polish arent americans and they maybe are not able to understand this difference but Polska is now forgotten but still exists and it is special, unfortunetly leaders bring this amazing land to total chaos and disaster, what means the people even dont understand that america is good and interesting when it is in the usa, and poland taking idea of beautyfoll life from usa is making a horrible mistake, but nation has to be keepeng strong by a professional leader, to not get lost, but alieve nothing will turn black into white und black into white.but those fools are really fool because this is what nation becames if noone cares about is - looking who will take care if polish gouverment... oh... god, please let me calm...- stinks.so worse land worse nation- really? and u believe it? let this nation rise under someones hornest hand and u will see... oh well anyway there is noone who could know what to do to find this leader, but if u really visit Poland look at it with respect, and u can blame those crowds in suits who it the tv do what they like most- tryes to destroy eachother and nation destroyes itself without their special passion, but stalin lenin, marx engles and before democratic system just made chaos here, i dont think that always the same methode is good no matter what and where, and here democration confused people and even much cause there where no autority when too much wanted to b the one who is authority so history is the past but here everything is specific and only needs organise into national identity. hopeless but in fact still poland schould b respected as a nationality with no caring hand. so what 4 u have to study here?
Ericlipis 4 | 26  
23 Nov 2008 /  #24
I think the 2 month visit is a fantastic Idea! I am sure you will find that you would like to go back to the US rather then stay here in Poland! The people here are not friendly. If you say hello to someone you don't know they will think you are going to try and rob them or you want something from them! This is still by far a communistic style country in mind and spirit! Good luck with your visit.
notusetochange  
22 Jan 2009 /  #25
My husband's job is having him to relocate to Poland for at least 7 months. I live in the US and have never been to another country. We have 7 children together and Im a little scared about, if the children would be able to attend school there. We are scheduled to arrive in Poland, April of this year, however, the children here in my state, in the US,dont get out of school until June 7th. If anyone can help me with this situation, I would appreciate it. I thought about not going at all. My husband does not agree with that, but I need to make sure the kids can finish school, and not be held back when we return to the states.
Krakowianka 1 | 243  
22 Jan 2009 /  #26
If its only a temporary position in Poland, I'd stay in the US with the 7 kids. 7 kids is a lot to handle, and taking them all out of school, and placing in a foreign tongue school would be drama. Do you kids know any polish at all? I'm not sure what school they could attend if they dont, maybe there are special private english schools.

Moving just one person takes a lot of adjustment, but a whole family of 9 is incredible.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,384  
22 Jan 2009 /  #27
We are scheduled to arrive in Poland, April of this year, however, the children here in my state, in the US,dont get out of school until June 7th.

By the time you get to Poland (June) the kids will be on holiday here too... until September.

Come here for two months... for a holiday and then go back. That way you will only be apart for two or three months.

Putting seven kids into private education would cost a great deal of money too.
nexans  
22 Feb 2009 /  #28
I am Polish - American naturalized in the United States in 2001. I am looking to move back to Poland for good with my wife and the 18 months American born daughter. Does any one have any idea which American company is hiring Americans in Poland now or wants to send an American to work overseas in their American location in Poland? That would help. Thank you.
Juche 9 | 292  
22 Feb 2009 /  #29
try the dept of state, maybe you can work at the us embassy in warsaw as a contract worker.
9876  
23 Feb 2009 /  #30
It depends on what you do for a living. I moved here in Spetember 08, hired by General Electric (GE Polska) in Warsaw. If you're an engineer, they're always looking to fill job postings - and one of the main requirements is fluency in English (all work is done in English). And for a place like this, the fact that you speak Polish as well, and have a US passport, is a huge plus. It's also a huge plus that you're Polish, and wouldn't have to go through the 5 month hassle of getting a Polish work permit and visa prior to moving here.

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