Return PolishForums LIVE
  PolishForums Archive :
Archives - 2005-2009 / Language  % width 76

"sorry" instead of "przepraszam"


z_darius 14 | 3,965  
6 Jan 2008 /  #31
The Poles lack any respect for their own culture and language and have allowed all sorts of new words in to their language.

You are suddenyl worried about that?

I remember you writing that Poles did not allow foreign words into Polish but actually stole them. You made exception for some vulgar words which, according to your pecular lingusitic theory, are purely Polish words, later imposed on neighboring nations, such as Russians.

Your take on the Polish language then is simple:

good and useful words - stolen from Russian
filth and vulgarities - native Polish words

The only person in this thread who lacks respect for Polish culture and langage is you.
You also display a blatant lack of undertstanding that languages are not closed systems. They interact and exchange vocabulary and concepts. You can try to present homegrown version of various aspects of lingusitics to a bum in a park, or some kids on the playground. Here you will alwyas find more than just one pair of eyes to scrutinize your idiotic comments.
Michal - | 1,865  
7 Jan 2008 /  #32
English people dont say at all 'hasta manana' , 'adios' borrowed from spanish, dont make me laugh mate

Yes, thats true, I have never looked at it from a Spanish point of view!
kioko - | 84  
7 Jan 2008 /  #33
No longer do they say warsztat sztuczny but now they say 'workshopy'!!

Excuse me, but... what is "warsztat sztuczny"???? I've naver heard that!
And I never say "workshop". I am on this forum for about a week and I have already noticed that Michal often writes what he thinks and what has nothing to do with the reality. How dare you say we have no respect to our culture and language! do you know all polish people?? stop generalizing everything! Do young english or americans don't change english words? Are there no neologisms or slang in english??

We use sometimes word "sorry" but only in conversation with friends, never in formal language. Is that a crime? Does that mean I have no respect to my culture?

I've read an article about poles in england, that they made some slang language, which make them easier to communicate, but that doesn't mean that polish language has changed in poland or that we are forgetting our own words. Don't make me laugh! Maybe you should go out and listen how english youth speaks, I am sure it is a Shakespare language, not changed for centuries, right?
Seanus 15 | 19,674  
7 Jan 2008 /  #34
Warsztat sztuczny - artificial workshop? It doesn't make sense
kioko - | 84  
7 Jan 2008 /  #35
indeed
z_darius 14 | 3,965  
7 Jan 2008 /  #36
I am on this forum for about a week and I have already noticed that Michal often writes what he thinks and what has nothing to do with the reality. How dare you say we have no respect to our culture and language! do you know all polish people?? stop generalizing everything! Do young english or americans don't change english words? Are there no neologisms or slang in english??

Michal would have to check in a dictionary what a neologism is.
All that he needs to know is that people are reading his vile posts and scrutinizing his ignorance. That may help him put away that mirror of his that made him fall in love with himself. Eventually, he may even learn something, albeit the progress has been slow so far - normally typical of persons with an IQ in the upper two digits.
Michal - | 1,865  
7 Jan 2008 /  #37
Warsztat sztuczny - artificial workshop? It doesn't make sense

If you know Polish, it does.
kioko - | 84  
7 Jan 2008 /  #38
If you knew Polish, you would know it does not!
z_darius 14 | 3,965  
7 Jan 2008 /  #39
If you know Polish, it does.

I was able to find this collocation only on one website. The link pointed to your own posts on PF:)
Seanus 15 | 19,674  
7 Jan 2008 /  #40
From a knowledge of Polish linguistic stems, it's possible that such a word existed aeons ago but sztuczny would generally be considered to mean artificial these days. One more thing, if u KNOW Polish like u r implying u do, why does ur profile state otherwise? Most Polish people think I've a good command of Polish. Me? I'm not so sure but enough to know that u were in error
m1ke - | 12  
8 Jan 2008 /  #41
The Poles lack any respect for their own culture

your wife didnt respect her culture when she married you, I wonder if she realise what kind of rubbish you write on this forum...
jones101 1 | 349  
16 Jan 2008 /  #42
Never heard 'sorki' in 4 years here...'sorry' is common but I agree doesn't sound good. I don't like the sounds of other language's words when changed to fit the new language.

Like if I said "przepraszam" but pronounced it according to American English rules it would sound really bad to Poles...same thing.
Polson 5 | 1,768  
16 Jan 2008 /  #43
I heard "sorry" instead of "przepraszam" a few times, but only young people. I think it's shorter (of course, 2 syllables instead of 3), and slang, people use this word when they're with friends or families. There's nothing serious. In France, like i guess in many other places, we say "c'est cool" (=it's cool). You wouldn't say that to your boss for example, but to friends, relatives, etc. I don't see any problem about that, but i think that it may disappoint the most puritan persons here... ;)
jkn005 1 | 127  
29 Jan 2008 /  #44
My gf complains when they use English words on the news or even politicians using them. Amongst friends don't really see a problem. My own creation is cho f***in lera.
Foreigner4 12 | 1,768  
29 Jan 2008 /  #45
i agree with jones101.

Also I personally feel the amount of english signs and slogans used in the advertising sector is not only poorly done but really takes away from polish charm as well.

the Silesia City Centre should be renamed imo.
Lettuce 1 | 23  
19 Feb 2008 /  #46
So does przepraszam mean 'excuse me', or 'sorry' or both? For example, if you accidentally spilled someones pint at the pub you'd say sorry, but if you were trying to get someones attention or squeeze through a crowd you'd say excuse me - would przepraszam be used in both these types of scenarios?
krysia 23 | 3,058  
19 Feb 2008 /  #47
So does przepraszam mean 'excuse me', or 'sorry' or both?

Means both.
You got that right!
Michal - | 1,865  
20 Feb 2008 /  #48
o does przepraszam mean 'excuse me', or 'sorry' or both? For example, if you

Yes, both these words seem to have become interchangeable in the Polish Language. I find it quite absurd how the Poles have allowed an English word in to their language. I wonder why they do not being in inflections to the word sorry. For instance ja sorruję, ty sorrujeś and my sorrujemy! When I was last in Poland, many years ago, I would hear young polish people say the word 'sorry' among themselves and I would simply cringe! It has the quality and cultural taste of a McDonald's fast food restaurant about it! Mind you, a word like przepraszam is difficult to say when you are drunk like many Poles usually are.
JustysiaS 13 | 2,239  
20 Feb 2008 /  #49
Yeah whatever michal. If you say "sory" in Poland, with the hard "r", it can be in some cases used as 'przepraszam'. But then many people dont like it. I was gettin out of a bus once and as ususal it was PACKED, people literally standing/sitting on each other, and i stomped on someones foot and said 'sory', and they were like 'it's przepraszam' ha ha. touchy touchy.
Michal - | 1,865  
20 Feb 2008 /  #50
I think its quite sad how Poland allows its language to be watered down. I came from the airport in Warsaw and saw all the advertisements for car purchase and rental. All the English marketing words 'leasing' 'marketing' I can not remember all the words now but there are more and more of them coming into the language. I watch M jak Miłość on our dish-six months behind Poland and there is even a bank advert before the programme begins with the English word 'prepaid'. I suppose I am getting off the subject of sorry and przepraszam but the principle is the same.
osiol 55 | 3,921  
20 Feb 2008 /  #51
I think its quite sad how Poland allows its language to be watered down

Especially when it was only watered-down Russian to start with! Soon, it will be almost pure water.
polski_zyd 2 | 72  
20 Feb 2008 /  #52
and they were like 'it's przepraszam' ha ha. touchy touchy.

PMSL!!!!!!!!111!!!! :D
Foreigner4 12 | 1,768  
20 Feb 2008 /  #53
I think its quite sad how Poland allows its language to be watered down.

i actually agree with the guy on this matter.
polski_zyd 2 | 72  
20 Feb 2008 /  #54
I hate to admit it, but I agree too!

Though it starts before you even take off for Poland - "boarding jest skończone" indeed!
lol :D
osiol 55 | 3,921  
20 Feb 2008 /  #55
Okay, but how did Polish people in the past deal with the influx of French words into the Polish language a couple of hundred years ago. How many of these words of French origin disappeared and how many still remain? Also, how well known is the Francophone origin those words that are now a part of the Polish language?
jones101 1 | 349  
21 Feb 2008 /  #56
Much of it has to do with sounding "international". All languages do it...they think it sounds 'smart' to use terms from other languages. English is the dominant global language (for now...may be Chinese someday depending on the tide) so that's the language people pilfer from.

I hear people here in Poland all the time smattering English words into a Polish conversation in an attempt to sound hip, smart or some how add emphasis to their meaning. It's funny when they are doing this in a pub and they realize you are a native English speaker...

My wife to be speaks perfect English and she hates this cool guy talk.
slyder 2 | 27  
22 Feb 2008 /  #57
From my understanding, the reason non-native Poles find the language so difficult to speak, is because historically the Polish have been very protective of their language, not allowing for simplification or blending. English is the best example of that, the native speakers through history didn't have international pressures in the same way, so they never felt their language was threatened, therefore the language has adapted, simplified, internationalized, and expanded its vocab with foreign words. The Poles protected their language for centuries.

At least the Poles aren't like the Japanese who are adopting as much English as possible for the 'coolness' factor. We have one Polish guy living with us, and I've heard the words 'kurwa' and 'dzięki' come out of the mouths of most of the English here, simply by exposure. We've also taken to calling 'percentage alcohol' a drink's 'voltage'.
Gosia - | 35  
22 Feb 2008 /  #58
IMO "sorry" has been well adopted by Polish culture. by many people it is no longer viewed as a foreign word - we don't say it with English accent and we spell it with strong Polish R. using przepraszam among young people (if it doesn't mean asking to be forgived for something) is rare. prszepraszam is very official and many people can't imagine saying przepraszam when they want to tell somebody to get out of their way etc. sorry is most commonly used in Poland in the sense of "excuse me" than "i'm sorry for something...". BUT i guess that it's only the youth culture that uses it so commonly. in serious situations etc nobody uses sorry! nobody says sorry to their teacher...

just like "buziaczki", "nara", "strzałka" etc. dont say they have taken the place of "do widzenia"!!!
jones101 1 | 349  
22 Feb 2008 /  #59
Slyder where do you live in PL? In Warsaw I hear people using English words for the 'cool factor' all the time...mostly the 30 and under crowd of course.

There are English words and phrases in advertisements all over the city...just look up and you will see it.

Personally I would like to see languages of all sorts stay pure. Often evolving language is dumbed down with stupid slang and 'cool speak' and it sounds bad.

I get grief from young folks for my formal Polish but praise from adults...funny how that is the same in every generation that passes. I never spoke like an idiot when I was young...um, ya know, like, dude....but you'd be pressed to find a teenage in the states that doesn't talk that way.
Magdalena 3 | 1,837  
22 Feb 2008 /  #60
Personally I would like to see languages of all sorts stay pure.

Unfortunately (?) there is no such thing as a "pure" language.
Polish-sounding words such as "dach", "fartuch", "ratusz", "kajzerka" are actually German.
Polish-sounding words such as "kościół", "cmentarz", "pacierz" are actually Latin.
Polish-sounding words such as "dyliżans", "romans", "pomarańcza" are actually French.

Same in English, same in German, same everywhere. Languages interbreed like crazy.

Archives - 2005-2009 / Language / "sorry" instead of "przepraszam"Archived