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"nothing special"


Poor Edward 10 | 154  
4 Aug 2008 /  #1
In work the other day I was given a phrase but am not too sure of the spelling of it. In english the phrase is "nothing special" and in polish it translates into nie ciekawego, or is it nie ciekwejo?
polishgirltx  
4 Aug 2008 /  #2
"nothing special"

nic ciekawego
nic specjalnego
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
4 Aug 2008 /  #3
Nic ciekawego means nothing interesting. Nic specialnego may be best for nothing special

OH, go with the above
OP Poor Edward 10 | 154  
4 Aug 2008 /  #4
When I want to pluralise something in Polish I was told to put a "y" at the end. Is this the case? And if so if Im pluralising something for girls is it not supposed to end in "a"?
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
4 Aug 2008 /  #5
Not always with y. For example, jedno piwo, dwa piwa, sześć piw. Where's the y there?

The resident experts will give u more accurate advice.
osiol 55 | 3,922  
4 Aug 2008 /  #6
When I want to pluralise something in Polish I was told to put a "y" at the end. Is this the case?

It depends which case. (Which grammatical case? Maybe I mean gender... and case!)

For a lot of masculine nouns, this is true.
OP Poor Edward 10 | 154  
4 Aug 2008 /  #7
Thanks, one thing that bugs me is theres no direct translation and nearly everyword has a few different meanings but Im learning more and more everyday, although uts a shame I dont get to practice at home cos Ive no polish friends only once a week outside work Ill meet up with someone.
Marek 4 | 867  
5 Aug 2008 /  #8
In English sometimes we respond to the question 'What's up?'/'What's new?' with the stock phrase 'Same old, same old.' In Polish, this would be roughly: 'No, co nowego?' - 'Wszystko po staremu.' = So, what's up? - Nothing new. (lit. "all as in the old way", or something like that!)

'Nothing special' as a polite answer to such a routine inquiry might also be 'Tak sobie.' Depends, as always, on the context-:)
OP Poor Edward 10 | 154  
5 Aug 2008 /  #9
Thanks Marek, Ill give it a bash in work tomorrow. Heres another question a guy said "witam" to me today when I passed him. But why would he say that if he seen me about five or six times before that? I thought witam meant welcome.
polishgirltx  
5 Aug 2008 /  #10
Heres another question a guy said "witam" to me today when I passed him. But why would he say that if he seen me about five or six times before that? I thought witam meant welcome.

i will have to read again my psychology textbook before answering your question...
Marek 4 | 867  
6 Aug 2008 /  #11
'Witam!' ((s.) Witaj! (pl.) Witajcie in the informal) also means 'hello'. Sometimes Poles will use the super informal 'Hej'! meaning 'Hey!' or 'Hi!', resp. 'Yo!' as used here in the States in the inner cities, often by African-Americans.

Poor Edward!

Say mate, how did it go at work? Did this Polish chap ever speak to you again?
Just curious-:)
OP Poor Edward 10 | 154  
9 Aug 2008 /  #12
Yes I did talk to him and I asked him why he said witam and he said nearly the exact answer you gave me. This is one far out language to learn and I love it when people say things and I get the insentive to learn from them. So come on people lets say informal slang to each other, so us less informed people can play catch up and question you all on the whys and hows.
Marek 4 | 867  
9 Aug 2008 /  #13
Hold that thought and frame that enthusiasm, 'cuz pal, yer shyerrr a gonna need it!!!!

BRING IT ON, DUDERINO!!!

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