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misleading differences between Polish and English languages


Easy_Terran 3 | 312  
4 Apr 2008 /  #61
pet in Polish is a fag

I know 'pet' as a cigarrete's butt, smoked (out?) cigarette
Melusine 5 | 20  
4 Apr 2008 /  #62
In French "preservatifs" are condoms. (Condom is the name of the French town where presumably they originated.)
In English a "preservative" is something you put in your homemade jams to stop them going mouldy.
I gather that since jam-making British ladies have colonised large swathes of rural France there have been plenty of red faces and misunderstandings when they've been chatting to their neighbours ;)...
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
4 Apr 2008 /  #63
fagot
pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fagot

and faggot

faggot
bajka - | 71  
4 Apr 2008 /  #64
would that be like faggotki ?
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
4 Apr 2008 /  #65
English: nigger -- Polish:
Bartolome 2 | 1,085  
4 Apr 2008 /  #66
Pollution - Eng. for 'contamination'
Polucja - Pol. for 'ejaculation during sleep'
benszymanski 8 | 465  
13 Apr 2008 /  #67
this thread is very interesting, where i come from in england people call each other "cock" which could mean "mate" for example, so when i said it to a polish friend of mine he got upset because he thought it meant the same as "kutas" lol

I would take offence too and I am from London. I think that calling someone a cock when not intended as an insult is probably very regional to where you are from. I have heard of it before though - is that from Lancashire? (Or whereever Coronation Street is set anyway...)
steve08 - | 3  
14 Apr 2008 /  #68
he he:) i must stop using it...im actually from cheshire, but i think the saying is from lancashire or yorkshire;)
BubbaWoo 33 | 3,510  
14 Apr 2008 /  #69
alright me ol cock sparra apples and pears wet kipper nods as good as a wink cor blimey guvna well i neva did old kent road dog an bone your avin a bubble
isthatu2 4 | 2,702  
14 Apr 2008 /  #70
eeh flower tha knows bar t'at its reet cold
BubbaWoo 33 | 3,510  
14 Apr 2008 /  #71
aye lad, grim
TheKruk 3 | 308  
15 Apr 2008 /  #72
When I first went into an internet cafe in Poland and knew very little Polish I pointed to a computer and said "Internet" the guy said "no" so I moved to the next computer and pointed and he said "no" , I moved to the third and he said "no" I looked like I was about to cry from confusion and he shouted "TAK"
Majcia - | 2  
15 Apr 2008 /  #73
when we say: "not really"
ex:"Are you hungry?"
"Not really"

Does it mean-he is not hungry at all or he is not hungry but in the same time he is a little bit?I had that conversation with my Polish mates during the English class,we found it a bit funny
OP panienka 1 | 205  
15 Apr 2008 /  #74
Does it mean-he is not hungry at all or he is not hungry but in the same time he is a little bit?

i think that he is hungry a little little little bit, like Polish "nie bardzo" or maybe "nie tak naprawdę"
F15guy 1 | 160  
15 Apr 2008 /  #75
z_darius: fagot and faggot

Polish fagot is a bassoon.

1913 Webster's dictionary lists five noun definitions for fagot, one of which is a bassoon:

1. A bundle of sticks, twigs, or small branches of trees
2. A bundle of pieces of wrought iron to be worked over into bars or other shapes
3. (Mus.) A bassoon. See Fagotto.
4. A person hired to take the place of another at the muster of a company.
5. An old shriveled woman.
benszymanski 8 | 465  
19 Apr 2008 /  #76
When my Mum came over from the UK to visit recently she was in a shop and said "super duper" whilst looking at some of the products, meaning "very good" or "great".

I explained to her that "super dupa" means something a little different in Polish....
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
19 Apr 2008 /  #77
she was in a shop and said "super duper"

I called out to my aunt in a supermarket - ciocia!
A few Latinos turned around with he expression of disgust on their faces.
Zgubiony 15 | 1,554  
19 Apr 2008 /  #78
Yeah, that's a funny comparison :) I had the same happen at work...knowing damn well what they both meant ;) Foreign lang. is fun
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
19 Apr 2008 /  #79
Foreign lang. is fun

It is, but sometimes people just refuse to learn it;
In secondary school I had Latin. Nobody wanted to read aloud: post huius mortem Numa Pompilius regnem ocupat
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446  
19 Apr 2008 /  #80
No, these are faux amis (false friends) -- cognates that mean something different in different langauges although usually they come from the same root. Curve/kurwa are not cognates but constitute a coincidental similarity.
Tiny Tom  
21 Apr 2008 /  #81
You have not spelled the words correctly. They should be 'bank' and 'fag'.
jump_bunny 5 | 237  
7 Jun 2009 /  #82
When English says pathetic it means sad,
When Pole says patetyczny it means elegiac.

When English says sad it means unhappy,
When Polish says sad it means orchard.
Victoria-Guest  
7 Jun 2009 /  #83
Now I am getting an ideas why Polish is confusing with our English. They should think English all the time while in America. And they should think Polish in Poland. You need to changes languages whenever you are.

For example: I am having ball today. (It mean I am having Fun.)
I am playing with ball. (It mean round beach ball or other balls)
I am going to Ballroom. (It mean dancing place)

You have to understand and use your judgements.

Ball have different meanings.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808  
7 Jun 2009 /  #84
Sympathy in English is when you feel sorry for someone
Sympatyczne in Polish means nice, as in "nice person."
mafketis 35 | 11,531  
7 Jun 2009 /  #85
I am having ball today. (It mean I am having Fun.)
I am playing with ball. (It mean round beach ball or other balls)
I am going to Ballroom. (It mean dancing place)

that should be

I'm having a ball today.
I'm playing with a ball.
I'm going to the ballroom. (or a ballroom)

you're welcome.
Arlene  
8 Jun 2009 /  #86
To mafketis::

(((that should be

I'm having a ball today.
I'm playing with a ball.
I'm going to the ballroom. (or a ballroom)

you're welcome.)))))

Very Good! Mafketis!!! See how well you are doing.

I am - I'm
I have - I've
It is - It's

This is example of America English.

Keep up good work.
benszymanski 8 | 465  
8 Jun 2009 /  #87
This is example of America English.

as opposed to what? I'm Britsh and we happen to use "I'm" in the UK too... ????
Arlene  
9 Jun 2009 /  #88
To benszymanski

That is up to people which they prefer to write. It make no difference how you write as long it is same words. Don't worry what British teach you. Your country is different and America is different. America have their language because America want to be separate from England so we know who is who. Don't forget British Settlers were living in America and this is how it became.
benszymanski 8 | 465  
9 Jun 2009 /  #89
I don't understand what you are talking about or what point you are trying to make.

This is example of America English

It's an example of English, used in America, Britain, everywhere, so I don't understand what point you are trying to make to Mafketis, apart from that it looks to be an attempt at sarcasm.
piotr_au - | 7  
4 Jul 2009 /  #90
I remember my first Polish winter, and the person I was speaking to mentioned the "Fatalny pogoda". I of course understood the English equivalent - fatally as in deadly or lethal. Fatalny means dreadful, fatal means śmiertalny!

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