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Madralo - is it insulting?


Barney 15 | 1,476  
10 Sep 2008 /  #1
Got called Madralo today in an email by a friend, did a search and came up with przemądrzły as a retort. Is this overly insulting considering that the banter can be at this level?

Double checking: Madralo is from mądrośç (however the hell you would pronounce that)?
Easy_Terran 3 | 312  
10 Sep 2008 /  #2
mądrala - smart ass

can be a little bit offensive, depend on the rest of the context, but usually it is a friendly poke with words, imho
OP Barney 15 | 1,476  
10 Sep 2008 /  #3
usually it is a friendly poke with words

It was.

Is przemądrzły at the same level?
Easy_Terran 3 | 312  
10 Sep 2008 /  #4
Is przemądrzały at the same level?

yes, and both have practically the same meaning
Arise_St_George 9 | 419  
10 Sep 2008 /  #5
Speaking of which I heard the word "Angol" meant something like "pffftt English people" or something like that. One time some Polish girl used that word to some of my colleagues and I asked her about it.

Am I correct in it being an unfriendly word referring to English people? She told me it wasn't an unfriendly word and it just meant "English person."
raindog - | 14  
10 Sep 2008 /  #6
Speaking of which I heard the word "Angol"

She told me it wasn't an unfriendly word and it just meant "English person."

I say , she wanted to squirm her way from a sticky situation by giving you a bull answer.
Angol has a derogatory conotation.
Arise_St_George 9 | 419  
17 Sep 2008 /  #7
Yup I thought as much and I'm glad I did question her about it. Slimey cow, pretending to be nicey nicey to everyone O.o I can't stand those people that shit on your back
Bondi 4 | 142  
24 Sep 2008 /  #8
Bleedin’ England is all about people who smile in your face, then talk bullshit behind your back. Shame that most foreigners adopt this behaviour all too easily...
ShelleyS 14 | 2,893  
24 Sep 2008 /  #9
Angol has a derogatory conotation.

Probably no more derogatory than calling a Polish person a Pole.

Bleedin’ England is all about people who smile in your face, then talk bullshit behind your back. Shame that most foreigners adopt this behaviour all too easily...

Is it really? So in "foreign" countries people are really honest and upfront all the time...pff!
esek_tmp  
24 Sep 2008 /  #10
Angol has a derogatory conotation.

I don't agree... Angol don't have to be insulting... it might be, but not necessary. Also.. it can be used but not well educated person who just doesn't know that it should be 'anglik'.
raindog - | 14  
26 Sep 2008 /  #11
I will be content to contend :) Here is empirical evidence:
Going aaaaaaaall the way back to the times, when Jugoslavia still existed.

Anybody remembers word " Jugol"? It was a word describing a Jugoslavian citizen....and believe you me, it was not a nice choice of a word, you would call somebody "Jugol", I guarantee, he would not buy you a drink.

Angol is Jusgol's pejorative brother in arms....
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
26 Sep 2008 /  #12
Also.. it can be used but not well educated person who just doesn't know that it should be 'anglik'.

Angol was used on a daily basis by English Philology students in Poland. Hardly uneducated people.
polishgirltx  
27 Sep 2008 /  #13
Angol

Jusgol

pepiczki for czechs....
Michal2 - | 78  
28 Sep 2008 /  #14
Angol was used on a daily basis

I think that the word angol is, in fact, a Hungarian word.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446  
28 Sep 2008 /  #15
A linguist told me that the suffix -ol mainly used in pejorative expressions has undergone a renascence in recent decades generating such words as Angol, Brytol, Kanadol and katol (for Catholic). Anyone know any others?
Bondi 4 | 142  
8 Oct 2008 /  #16
Is it really? So in "foreign" countries people are really honest and upfront all the time...pff!

No, they aren't... at all. That's why they (we) adopt it so easily. But we have different reasons. (And we have no such manners that the English still seem to have in most cases - I have to admit that!)

I think that the word angol is, in fact, a Hungarian word.

It's meaning is English or Englishman. But it is adopted from Latin. No derogatory meaning (same as "Hungarian" in English). In Hungarian, we only have derogatory/tender names for the neighbouring countries and the ethnic minorities... :)

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