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kaboom, ruff ruff ruff, meow, or moo, or bang! - sound effects in Polish?


EnemyCommander 7 | 7  
18 Nov 2006 /  #1
to polish people wat would things like kaboom, ruff ruff ruff, meow, or moo, or bang! oink, or a horse neighing etc. sound like?
mmm  
18 Nov 2006 /  #2
ruff ruff ruff - hau hau hau
moo - muu
meow - miau

etc. but don't know how to pronounce it
Cyprian 2 | 69  
18 Nov 2006 /  #3
hahahaah r u for real, i always thought sound effects sounded the same all around the world.... or do they change when they cross borders......... is lauging like hahaahaha in canada titititititi in china?
mmm  
18 Nov 2006 /  #4
The topic is sound effects in POLISH. I think there's a difference when said "moo" vs "muu" for a foreigner.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,384  
19 Nov 2006 /  #5
In England: ouch or Ow !

In Poland: Ow + a = Owa !
miranda  
19 Nov 2006 /  #6
In Poland: Ow + a = Owa !

you kill me Wrocalw:)
kryzs  
19 Nov 2006 /  #7
kichy kichy kichy

kokarooo kokarooooo
miranda  
19 Nov 2006 /  #8
kokarooo kokarooooo

what's that?
kryzs  
19 Nov 2006 /  #9
Thats the polish sound a chiken makes
Janf  
19 Nov 2006 /  #10
heres another that comes in useful . yum yum according to my phrase book is offically mnjm mnjm in Polish.
good at meals and other occasions :)
Brzeszczot  
8 Dec 2006 /  #11
i always thought sound effects sounded the same all around the world....

Well, you thought wrong, pal. Onomatopoeises ARE different for different languages.

Dogs don't barkwoof woof in Poland they szczekająhau hau instead. Pigs don't grunt or squealoink oink here but rather chrumkająchrum chrumor kwicząkwi kwi. Horses rżą, just like people with annoying laughter. And as for the storks, they only klekoczą in Polish. :)
FISZ 24 | 2,116  
9 Dec 2006 /  #12
Here are a few:

Bee: bzzzzz
Cat: miau
Cow: muuuuu
Donkey: iha, iha
Frog: kum kum
Hen: ko ko ko
Rooster: kukuryku
Wroclaw 44 | 5,384  
9 Dec 2006 /  #13
It's interesting that some of these animals would have no problem communicating with their counterparts on foreign soil. Others it would seem would find it rather difficult.

The cow would be able to make himself understood quite well in England. However, if the frog chooses to travel, he should at least learn some local vocabulary and pronunciation.

If you have either four or six legs then this thread undoubtedly provides good tips.

Enjoy your travels.
Micek - | 13  
10 Jan 2007 /  #14
Yes especially cows :)
About one year ago there was first page story ( it was in "Fakt" :) ) about a group of cows that runned away from Bialorus to Poland. SO I gues they didn't have any communication problems after all...
bossie 1 | 123  
10 Jan 2007 /  #15
Bee: bzzzzz
Cat: miau
Cow: muuuuu
Donkey: iha, iha
Frog: kum kum
Hen: ko ko ko
Rooster: kukuryku

Ha ha ha, Fisz, I haven't read anything this funny for a good while. It really put a big smile on my face. Thanks :)

BTW, does anyone remember a children's song about frogs with the chorus re re kum kum?

Let me give you a few more sounds:

Dog: hau hau /how how/
Goat: mee mee /mer mer/
Ram: bee bee /ber ber/
Crow: kra kra
Sparrow: ćwir ćwir /chveer chveer/
Stork: kle kle
Swiss Raindrop  
11 Jan 2007 /  #16
r u for real, i always thought sound effects sounded the same all around the world.... or do they change when they cross borders

Welcome to the rest of the world, Cyprian. Yes, sound effects ARE different in different languages and countries and Enemy Commander's question is an excellent one. I don't know the polish sounds but in German the pigs say "grunz, grunz", and the dogs go "klaff, klaff". The ducks say quack, but in German it sounds like a Hogan's Hero's version "qvaak, qvaak". In Japanese the rooster says "kikiriki".
Eurola 4 | 1,909  
11 Jan 2007 /  #17
The cat is purring in english purr, purr, purr, but mruczy in polish mruu, mruu, mruu
The pig also squils (kwiczy) in polish: kwik, kwik
Bees are buzzing (brzecza) in polish: bzzz, bzzz, bzzz
bossie 1 | 123  
13 Jan 2007 /  #18
I thought that there are more sound imitating words than just those of animals.

Bum /boom/ - sound of an explosion or impact
trach /tra-h/ - when sth breaks, esp. wood
wrrr /vrrr/ - a car (or an angry dog)
plaś /plash/ - when sth wet falls, e.g. a jelly on a plate
łup /woop/ - when you hit yourself or sth with great force
dup /doop/ - as above but a rude version (dupa=ass) so super dooper sounds funny
puk puk /pook pook/ or stuk stuk /stook stook/ - knock knock
pstryk /pstrick/ - when you swith the light on or click your fingers

Can anyone think of any more?
Narkommandant 2 | 37  
14 Jan 2007 /  #19
rather than bum (boom) i reckon buch(boo-h) is more appropriate.

also, to denote a splashing sound, chlup (hloop) is most appropriate.
Ghik  
23 Jan 2007 /  #20
Heh... something just came to my mind:

jeb /yeb/ - rude, something like "dup"
ciach /cha-h/ - when something is cut
bossie 1 | 123  
15 Feb 2007 /  #21
brrr - when you suddenly feel cold
wrrr /vrrr/ - when a dog growls

apsik /ah-psheek/ - a sneeze

Uf, Uff /oof/ - sound of relief, phew
hyypia 3 | 41  
17 Feb 2007 /  #22
is lauging like hahaahaha in canada titititititi in china?

well i can tell u that it's the same hahahahahahah in chinese :)
cichy  
19 Feb 2007 /  #23
all of that is called 'onomatopeje'

don't use jeb /yeb/ it's very bad like dupa /ass/

plaś /plash/ plask
NoFear  
21 Feb 2007 /  #24
i always thought sound effects sounded the same all around the world.

Most of them do it's just a matter of noting

f.e. meow actualy should be read as [mi'aU] right ? in poland we also read it [miaU], and write it down the same way.
osiol 55 | 3,922  
5 Feb 2009 /  #25
Everything anyone could possibly want to know about communicating with Polish animals.

Polish dog: "Hau hau." Translation: Good day to you sir.
Japanese duck: "Hau hau" Translation: Oh hello. How are you?

Polish frog: "Kwak"
English duck: "Quack" Translation: I think I understood that, but I'm not sure.
Guest  
12 Feb 2009 /  #26
there dont acoutaly sound different to one person but eery person hears it differently depending on where they are from
Olasz - | 69  
17 Feb 2009 /  #27
kichy kichy kichy

kokarooo kokarooooo

I'm afraind you're wrong

if it's "kici, kici" like "kity, kity" when atracting cat's attention
it's definetly not the polish sound a chiken makes :)

heres another that comes in useful . yum yum according to my phrase book is offically mnjm mnjm in Polish.
good at meals and other occasions

it's rather "mniam mniam" :)
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
8 Mar 2009 /  #28
sound effects in polish?

The term is onomatopoeia, words that imitate the sounds they describe.

A prime example in the Polish language is Julian Tuwim's Lokomotywa. In this case the awesome onomatopoeic effects were achieved not only by the choice of words but also by the rhythm of the poem.

Lokomotywa

Stoi na stacji lokomotywa,
Ciężka, ogromna i pot z niej spływa -
Tłusta oliwa.
Stoi i sapie, dyszy i dmucha,
Żar z rozgrzanego jej brzucha bucha:
Buch - jak gorąco!
Uch - jak gorąco!
Puff - jak gorąco!
Uff - jak gorąco!
Już ledwo sapie, już ledwo zipie,
A jeszcze palacz węgiel w nią sypie.
Wagony do niej podoczepiali
Wielkie i ciężkie, z żelaza, stali,
I pełno ludzi w każdym wagonie,
A w jednym krowy, a w drugim konie,
A w trzecim siedzą same grubasy,
Siedzą i jedzą tłuste kiełbasy.
A czwarty wagon pełen bananów,
A w piątym stoi sześć fortepianów,
W szóstym armata, o! jaka wielka!
Pod każdym kołem żelazna belka!
W siódmym dębowe stoły i szafy,
W ósmym słoń, niedźwiedź i dwie żyrafy,
W dziewiątym - same tuczone świnie,
W dziesiątym - kufry, paki i skrzynie,
A tych wagonów jest ze czterdzieści,
Sam nie wiem, co się w nich jeszcze mieści.

Lecz choćby przyszło tysiąc atletów
I każdy zjadłby tysiąc kotletów,
I każdy nie wiem jak się natężał,
To nie udźwigną - taki to ciężar!

Nagle - gwizd!
Nagle - świst!
Para - buch!
Koła - w ruch!

Najpierw
powoli
jak żółw
ociężale
Ruszyła
maszyna
po szynach
ospale.
Szarpnęła wagony i ciągnie z mozołem,
I kręci się, kręci się koło za kołem,
I biegu przyspiesza, i gna coraz prędzej,
I dudni, i stuka, łomoce i pędzi.

A dokąd? A dokąd? A dokąd? Na wprost!
Po torze, po torze, po torze, przez most,
Przez góry, przez tunel, przez pola, przez las
I spieszy się, spieszy, by zdążyć na czas,
Do taktu turkoce i puka, i stuka to:
Tak to to, tak to to, tak to to, tak to to,
Gładko tak, lekko tak toczy się w dal,
Jak gdyby to była piłeczka, nie stal,
Nie ciężka maszyna zziajana, zdyszana,
Lecz raszka, igraszka, zabawka blaszana.

A skądże to, jakże to, czemu tak gna?
A co to to, co to to, kto to tak pcha?
Że pędzi, że wali, że bucha, buch-buch?
To para gorąca wprawiła to w ruch,
To para, co z kotła rurami do tłoków,
A tłoki kołami ruszają z dwóch boków
I gnają, i pchają, i pociąg się toczy,
Bo para te tłoki wciąż tłoczy i tłoczy,,
I koła turkocą, i puka, i stuka to:
Tak to to, tak to to, tak to to, tak to to!...
Jeshco 1 | 11  
10 Mar 2009 /  #29
When my sons where little they knew perfectly well that there was a distinct difference between a cow and a krowa, a dog i pies etc.

When asked in English about the cow sound, it was moo (with the closed uuu almost with a bit of the Polish "i" in it), a krowa for a change made the MUUU sound with a wide open vowel U. Dog was ruff, pies hau.

For them it made a perfect sense, for us it was incredibly funny.
Just like "Mój nie worka (łerka)" - this gem about a broken pencil.

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