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HOW DOES RUSSIAN CZECH, URKAINIAN SOUND TO POLISH SPEAKERS?


Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448  
23 Aug 2009 /  #1
I wonder how native speakers of Polish relate to the sound and lilt of spoken Russian, Czech and Urkainian?
I know there are jokes about Czech (hodovla divek = girl's dorm, dachovy osranec = pigeon). There was a Polish satirist (Ross, Rosiewicz?) who had a song about why he couldn't possibly marrry a Czech girl because he'd die of laughter.

As a native speaker of English I for one find spoken Dutch somehow clippety/gekloppen amusing.
Nika 2 | 507  
23 Aug 2009 /  #2
There was a Polish satirist (Ross, Rosiewicz?) who had a song about why he couldn't possibly marrry a Czech girl because he'd die of laughter.

I almost died of laughter only by reading this bit (it's Andrzej Rosiewicz).
For me Russian sounds great - it is very similar to Polish but I find it much nicer. As for Czech and Slovak, they sound hilarious to me, some words and expressions sound like a joke, I mean as if someone intentionally made it the way that it sounds very funny in Polish.

I don't know about Ukranian...
Bondi 4 | 142  
23 Aug 2009 /  #3
Ukrainian is somewhere in-between Polish and Russian (sounds the f'ken same as Russian, if you ask me). Native Poles say that Czech and Slovak conserved lots of old words, so they sound archaic.

As for Czech and Slovak, they sound hilarious to me, some words and expressions sound like a joke, I mean as if someone intentionally made it the way that it sounds very funny in Polish.

When I first heard "coś do picia", I was in stitches. Czech and Slovak pièa (same in Hungarian, picsa) = cipa in Polish. :)

As a native speaker of English I for one find spoken Dutch somehow clippety/gekloppen amusing.

Dutch = a drunken German sailor, with a pipe in his mouth, is trying to speak English. ;o)
Nomsense  
24 Aug 2009 /  #4
When I first heard "coś do picia", I was in stitches. Czech and Slovak pièa (same in Hungarian, picsa) = cipa in Polish. :)

Or... picza
Lyzko  
24 Aug 2009 /  #5
Bondi,

Dutch - German damaged on delivery-:)

Russian (for Poles) - a viscous river oozing forth

Polish (for Russians) - like birds chirping, chattering
mvefa 5 | 591  
24 Aug 2009 /  #6
Dutch - German damaged on delivery-:)

hahaha somehow true
Lyzko  
26 Aug 2009 /  #7
Sorry, hoor! Dat was ongerecht van mij-:)

I trust you understood the humorous intent of the English 'damaged on delivery', a reference to the antiquated postal system!
Michal - | 1,865  
27 Aug 2009 /  #8
nder how native speakers of Polish relate to the sound and lilt of spoken Russian, Czech and Urkainian?
I know there are jokes about Czech (hodovla divek = girl's dorm, dachovy osranec = pigeon). There w

Russian is very difficult for Poles to understand. The language is way too complicates for them. Slovak is about the nearest living language to modern day Polish so they can understand that language without any trouble.
KurwaMaciek  
30 Oct 2009 /  #9
Lyzko

hah, russian doesn't sound like a tough langauge, polish sounds tougher, czech and slovak sounds like kid's talkLyzko
OsiedleRuda  
30 Oct 2009 /  #10
I know there are jokes about Czech (hodovla divek = girl's dorm, dachovy osranec = pigeon). There was a Polish satirist (Ross, Rosiewicz?) who had a song about why he couldn't possibly marrry a Czech girl because he'd die of laughter.

Oh ffs, not this one again :p

MODS!!! Thread in need of merging alert! haha

https://polishforums.com/life/poles-find-czech-funny-23843/

See? ;)

Slovak is about the nearest living language to modern day Polish so they can understand that language without any trouble.

Rubbish!!!

I've spoken Polish all my life and taught myself Czech, which ought to help with Slovak, but only does to some extent (I just can't get used to all that hovorit instead of mluvit stuff, haha).

Even with the help of the above, I find most Slovaks round here (there are lots) quite difficult to understand, whereas I can understand most Czechs pretty well. Even in Brno :D

My mum, on the other hand, has never attempted to learn Czech, can speak Russian as well as Polish, but understands Slovaks quite well. So how come I can't if I understand Polish at a native-like level? Following your theory, I ought to. But I don't.

Maybe the fact that even Bratislavans may have difficulty with eastern Slovak dialects may be a clue. Or the fact that the language is gradually moving away from Czech since the two countries separated. And I seriously doubt that it is becoming "more Polish".

But what would some Pole-hating trolley-pusher know anyway. :p
gumishu 11 | 5,335  
30 Oct 2009 /  #11
I like the sound of every one of these languages

it is easier to understand Slovak because it has very similar accent/prosody/intonation to Polish - it's like Czech spoken with Polish accent

some Slovak dialects sound very much like Polish only the words are different (I have witnessed some Slovaks on their shopping in Zakopane and first thought it is some strange Polish dialect then realised there is no such Polish dialect)

there is this thing like Lithuanian and Russian - they are very similar in sound - and if you don't listen closely you can take Lithuanian for Russian - but when you do you don't recognize a word - except this bliad' thing (which is of course Russian anyway)
southern 75 | 7,096  
30 Oct 2009 /  #12
Czech sounds very sexy and sensational when spoken by women.Polish does not have this quality,is far more monotonous:


Gaa 2 | 155  
30 Oct 2009 /  #13
czech sounds ridiculous.

i don't know how polish sounds, the most annoying of all slavic languages are croatian, slovenian and serbian, i like russian and ukrainian
southern 75 | 7,096  
31 Oct 2009 /  #14
the most annoying of all slavic languages are croatian, slovenian and serbian

Yes,serbian is annoying,I agree.It is like someone starting speaking russian but instead of getting softer and river flow like,he becomes syncopated,harsher and more threatening.

You will understand why they speak like that if you knew where they come from.
Świadomy  
8 Nov 2009 /  #15
Gumishu! Lithuanian Baltic language, Russian is Slavic, they have nothing common. Perhaps, specific pronounciacion of letter l (called in Polish £ sceniczne, like in old Polish movies or like in announcement of station Ratusz Arsena£ in Warsaw Metro) makes them a little bit similar.
gumishu 11 | 5,335  
8 Nov 2009 /  #16
I am not sure you ever heard Lithuanian - if you don't listen closely you get an impression Russian is spoken (this was at least my impression) - btw Baltic and Slavic languages are the two closest language families within Indoeuropean branch with lots of common roots (roots in etymological terms) - they even have strong grammar similarities - (for example the same ending in the infinitive)
Salomon 2 | 436  
8 Nov 2009 /  #17
Czech sounds very sexy and sensational when spoken by women.Polish does not have this quality,is far more monotonous.

Petra Niemcova ....

Niemiec in all slavic languages means the same ;-)

Czech sounds very sexy and sensational when spoken by women.Polish does not have this quality,is far more monotonous.

Petra Niemcova ....

Niemiec in all slavic languages means the same ;-)
frd 7 | 1,399  
9 Nov 2009 /  #18
I really like Chech language, it might sound funny for some polish speakers but it is far from ridiculous.. somebody who states that probably heard it few times randomly somewhere.

I recommend listening to Jaromir Nahovica, many of my polish friends really like this Chech poet, songwriter and singer.. great piece of music..

Vlastovko let - Jaskółko leć - Swallow fly

Zatimco se koupes - Gdy się kąpiesz - While you bathe

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