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Double entendres in the Polish language?


osiol 55 | 3,922  
21 Feb 2008 /  #1
Missus.
joo who - | 100  
21 Feb 2008 /  #2
Double what?? Is "entendre" English language, Polish language or fluent Double Dutch? Or is only a double entendre double dutch??
OP osiol 55 | 3,922  
21 Feb 2008 /  #3
Partly I thought I'd give people the opportunity to post some things in Polish with two meanings - one innocent, the other risque (entendre, risque - English is a great language).

But mostly I thought the title looked good following the Are there double letters in the Polish language? thread.
joo who - | 100  
21 Feb 2008 /  #4
Thanks! Another disappointment for my double English teacher parentage!!
Was discussing a double entendre just today as it happens:
"The past is history, the future a mystery but today is a gift...which is why it's called the present"...where present is the double entendre, right? Nope...thick as ever! Nothing risque there!

Thinking hard...talk in 2 weeks!
starchild 2 | 120  
21 Feb 2008 /  #5
A double entendre, as Osiol says has two meanings, one bieng literal and the other almost always sexual in nature... so unless i'm missing something I don't think you're example would count as a double entendre :-)

Edit... opps you edited! haha
djf 18 | 166  
21 Feb 2008 /  #6
The best double entendres are in the 'Carry On' films and also the 'Lovely, wobbly, randy old ladies' from Harry Enfield and Chums.
"Oh what a lovely pair"
"Just up my backpassage, oh young man!"
starchild 2 | 120  
21 Feb 2008 /  #7
A woman walks into a bar and asks for a double entendre, so the barman gives her one

Chris Tarrant discussing the first Millionaire winner Judith Keppel on This
Morning: "She was practising fastest finger first by herself in bed last night."
OP osiol 55 | 3,922  
21 Feb 2008 /  #8
Hmm - all seem to be English so far.
joo who - | 100  
21 Feb 2008 /  #9
randy old ladies' from Harry Enfield

That's me then?? I AM a double entendre!
starchild 2 | 120  
21 Feb 2008 /  #10
Yeah... sorry. Thought some examples might explain the term a bit better.

Where's JustysiaS when you need her??
Bartolome 2 | 1,085  
21 Feb 2008 /  #11
Sure there are, but I guess there's a thread on Polish slang.
OP osiol 55 | 3,922  
21 Feb 2008 /  #12
But this is more precise than just slang.

Thought some examples might explain the term a bit better

It might help. We just need to lure the right people in. The problem is some people who might have something to add might just think it's another off-topic chit-chat.
Bartolome 2 | 1,085  
21 Feb 2008 /  #13
Ok.
Ptak - 1) A bird 2) A c0ck
Balony 1) Baloons 2) (oYo)
Bzykać 1) Sound made by a flying mosquito 2) [+ się] To sh@g
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
21 Feb 2008 /  #14
laska - a cane, a pretty girl, a gril
Bartolome 2 | 1,085  
21 Feb 2008 /  #15
Dupa - 1) Ar$e
2)

a pretty girl

z_darius 14 | 3,968  
21 Feb 2008 /  #16
cyc/cycek - a clumsy/stupid person - a boob, breasts
szpara - narrow gap, woman, vagina
joo who - | 100  
21 Feb 2008 /  #17
We just need to lure the right people in

The cavalry has arrived!
And I'm going to seek out the Paracetamol to soothe my over-taxed brain cell!
djf 18 | 166  
21 Feb 2008 /  #18
Surely the old:

"give me ice creams" is a db?
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
21 Feb 2008 /  #19
jaja/jaka - eggs, (balls (testicles)
członek - member (of a group) , penis
OP osiol 55 | 3,922  
21 Feb 2008 /  #20
I knew of a few of these already, but there are some that are new to me too.

członek - member (of a group) , penis

Curious how there is the same thing in English with this one.
RJ_cdn - | 267  
21 Feb 2008 /  #21
cipka/cipa - chicken or vagina
osioł/oślica - donkey or person
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
21 Feb 2008 /  #22
Życ in Polish means to live but in Silesian it could also mean arse/ass.

What's the difference between a donkey and an ass?
djf 18 | 166  
21 Feb 2008 /  #23
An ass is just another name for a donkey
joo who - | 100  
21 Feb 2008 /  #24
Think an ass is a horse x donkey cross

No, that's definitely a mule!
An ass is something which belongs to your neighbour which you shouldn't covet.

Argh...you edited on me
MareGaea 29 | 2,752  
21 Feb 2008 /  #25
No, that's definitely a mule!

I don't know about English, but in Dutch there is a difference if the male is a horse and when the male is a donkey:

Dad Horse - Mom Donkey: Muildier
Dad Donkey - Mom Horse: Muilezel.

Like I said, I don't know if Polish or English knows this distinction, but Dutch, as shown has.

Edit: NB: "dier" = animal in Dutch and "ezel" = donkey in Dutch. Muil = mule.

M-G
joo who - | 100  
21 Feb 2008 /  #26
Mule in English is sired by a donkey, out of a horse mare
A Hinny is sired by a horse and out of a donkey

So, technically, it's either definitely a mule or definitely a hinny!
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
21 Feb 2008 /  #27
So, djf, u r saying that if u mix joo who (the horse) and Osioł (the donkey), u'll get an ass? Name calling here are we? LOL
Ryszard - | 89  
21 Feb 2008 /  #28
smerfy - smurfs or... cops
canarinhos - yeah, the national football Brazilian team. Or the ticket-inspectors in Poland ...although I admit more popular is "kanar" :)
banda - imported from english. Twice: strip of metal delimiting something (for example playing field) or group of people, usually with negative connotation

Życ in Polish means to live but in Silesian it could also mean arse/ass.

This is true, but as the pronouncation is the same the notation differs:
żyć - to live
rzyć - ass (in silesian)
Similar examples:
morze/może - the sea/maybe
hełm/Chełm - helmet/Chełm (city)
bóg/buk - god/beech

cipka/cipa - chicken or vagina

First heard. Ever.
You only use "cip, cip" as onomatopoeic for (small) chicken but you won't call them that way.
RJ_cdn - | 267  
21 Feb 2008 /  #29
First heard. Ever. You only use "cip, cip" as onomatopoeic for (small) chicken but you won't call them that way.

kurnik.pl/slownik/sp.phtml?sl=cipka
Ryszard - | 89  
21 Feb 2008 /  #30
If you haven't noticed, this is link to the free dictionary used by polish net scrabble players... Maybe you can find this entry in other, serious, dictionaries but the one thing is its existance and the other usability. And in my opinion it's close to none. Or maybe none except using it in scrabble - while making sure you're not using vulgar words, of course :)

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