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Basic words to say to a Polish girl?


charris0n  
12 Nov 2006 /  #1
I work in a primary school and will have a polish girl starting tomorrow who does not speak english. I dont dpeak Polish either but am trying to find ways to make it as easy as possible for her.

Can anyone offer any help with basic words?

I would be most grateful!!!!!!!
bartek212 2 | 19  
12 Nov 2006 /  #2
Few addresses:

polish-translator.net/polish_phrases.html
meetpoland.com/useful-polish-words-and-phrases.html

And here's a free ENG>PL and PL>ENG dictionary:

portalwiedzy.onet.pl/tlumacz.html

Good luck! :)
Bronek  
23 Nov 2006 /  #3
The initial exposure and confrontation will prove difficult and trying; soon to be replaced by comprehension and mutual understanding. Patience, consideration, exploration, and a good English / Polish Polish / English dictionary, there is one available from Random House, will serve to bridge the gap. Like your new student, I too came into the American School system without speaking English.

About six month is all that is required for your student to learn to understand you. The enunciation may have something to be desired but the understanding is there.
nicoletia  
23 Nov 2006 /  #4
The funniest thing is that I've never met anyone who would like to sent his/her child to english school without any knowledge about this language. It may appear very difficult for you to start.Actually it's almost impossible to learn this child english without any basics. If I was you I'd advise parents to move their child to the school, where it can be taught by polish teachers. I wish you luck:)
Amathyst 19 | 2,702  
23 Nov 2006 /  #5
[quote=nicoletia, Post #4 ]If I was you I'd advise parents to move their child to the school, where it can be taught by polish teachers.[/quote

Why should Polish children be provided with Polish teachers whilst they are in England...our education system is stretched enough without trying to pander to every nationalities needs...

When the vietnamees came over in the late 70is they were not given any extra help and most were from small villages and didnt speak any english they soon adapted and learnt the language
Dagmara 1 | 38  
27 Dec 2006 /  #6
When I moved From Poland to Florida I knew VERY little English and was not used to hearing it with an American accent. I went straight into ninth grade. Math was a piece of cake. Geography was not too bad because the names of places were somewhat similar. For history and science classes I did lots of vocabulary memorization and I answered questions by copying full paragraph on each topic from my text books. My teqachers were okay with that. My first semester i failed English only. Went to summer school and frm then on had no problems. The best thing I ever did was memorize over 100 irregular verbs on three tenses (ex. know, knew, known), which improved my English a lot. The hardest thing was other students making fun of my accent, my clothes, my hair... No teacher ever stood up for me. I graduated with a 3.5 GPA and the rest is history. So my advice to you as a teacher is to be patient and supportive and PLEASE do not try to send this child to another school. They tried to do that to me. I'm glad my dad stood his ground and I stayed in that school because I don't think I would have received as good of an education in another school.
Amathyst 19 | 2,702  
27 Dec 2006 /  #7
I take it that was quite some time ago, since your english is perfect now
Dagmara 1 | 38  
3 Jan 2007 /  #8
THANKS! Dec 17, 1987
Kasia2007  
17 Sep 2007 /  #9
Actuall, i think you will find that you are gravely worng. I myself went to english school as a child knowing only the phrase : 'can i go to the tiolet please', and right now I am an IB student who got an A in GCSE english. Children grasp language so much quicker than adults do, so dont cripple your children by forcing them to learn a language the hard way: by being taught slowly. They JUST DONT NEED IT.
scooby15268 - | 1  
6 Dec 2007 /  #10
Cześć! = Hello or hi
Miłego dnia = have a good day
wesolych Świąt Bożego Narodzenia = Merry Christmas
Kochający = With Love
osiol 55 | 3,922  
6 Dec 2007 /  #11
Posts: 1
Cześć!

Good way to start.
Guest  
2 Aug 2008 /  #12
have a look at this ww.learn-polish.pl
sledz 23 | 2,250  
2 Aug 2008 /  #13
Nigdy nie widzałem tackich pięknych oczy.....
I have never seen such beautiful eyes...

Polish women have beautiful eyes:):):)
ShelleyS 14 | 2,893  
2 Aug 2008 /  #14
I have never seen such beautiful eyes...

Im not sure about the education system in the USA, but if a teacher in the UK said that to a 12 year old girl he wouldn't be a teach for very long after ;-)



Had to move the tiff, but this was amusing.
Switezianka - | 463  
3 Aug 2008 /  #15
charris0n, don't worry.
At this age children do not LEARN language but ACQUIRE it in a more natural way similar to that of acquiring their mother tongue. Therefore, they learn it fast and relatively effortlessly. I think you should help her by non-verbal communication rather than trying to speak Polish.

I've never met anyone who would like to sent his/her child to english school without any knowledge about this language. It may appear very difficult for you to start. Actually it's almost impossible to learn this child english without any basics.

If you knew some psycholinguistics basics, that wouldn't seem so scary. I even heard an opinion (from a specialist), that if you want your children to speak English better (especially in terms of pronunciation) and you're a foreigner, you should not speak English at home at all lest your children take up your foreigner errors and accent.
Cardno85 31 | 976  
12 Aug 2008 /  #16
I agree with the comments on just being patient and communicate using lots of hand gestures and speaking slowly and clearly (which as a primary teacher you probably do anyway). When I was at primary school in Dubai we had a boy, Bartosz, that started with no english knowledge whatsoever and within a few months he was communicating easily enough and was one of the first people in the class to be reading. I do believe recently he completed his BA in English at a uni in Liverpool.

As has been mentioned...young childred pick up other languages much faster than adults.
melanienicolaid  
2 Oct 2008 /  #17
I myself have just received 2 Polish children in my class of 4/5 year olds this week. The little boy is at the appropriate age for my class, the girl is 2 years older. So far for the last 4 mornings the little girl has cried continuously and refuses to have a go at anything I try to offer to her. Today she wailed, the noise got louder and louder and the other children's behaviour was whipped up to a frenzy. Her parents cannot speak English and it appears that Mum has a small child at home who she needs to look after and so she cannot stay in school to help support her. what do I do?
HAL9009 2 | 304  
4 Oct 2008 /  #18
Is it possible to get her some polish books appropriate to her age? If she had some (funny for example) stories to read in her own language it might allow her to calm down a bit and not feel so lost. Then she might begin to interact with the others.

If there were any other polish children in the school that she could communicate with it might also set her at ease a little.
polishgirltx  
8 Nov 2008 /  #19
Basic words to say to a Polish girl?

posprzątaj
ugotuj mi kolacje
chodź do łóżka
uwielbiaj mnie

these are the basic...
;)
Dawid  
11 Nov 2008 /  #20
posprzątaj
ugotuj mi kolacje
chodź do łóżka
uwielbiaj mnie

Clean
Cook me dinner
Come to bed
Worship me

I would definitely NOT recommend saying these to any girl! :)
esek 2 | 228  
11 Nov 2008 /  #21
posprzątaj
ugotuj mi kolacje
chodź do łóżka
uwielbiaj mnie

uhh, and where is the dinner ?! :D ROTFL, just joking :D
polishgirltx  
11 Nov 2008 /  #22
lol... and also:

czy wyprałaś mi te skarpetki, które stały w kącie koło łóżka?
may be useful... ;)
sausage 19 | 777  
11 Nov 2008 /  #23
czy wyprałaś mi te skarpetki, które stały w kącie koło łóżka?

I see this sort of thing as an opportunity to teach your beloved new words, such as "strewn"
polishgirltx  
11 Nov 2008 /  #24
strewn

it's like porozrzucać?

the first thing i've noticed is that i can't pronounce it...
sausage 19 | 777  
11 Nov 2008 /  #25
it's like porozrzucać?

that rings a bell with me. not entirely sure though. i would have to fetch the other volume of my dictionary.
Bzibzioh  
11 Nov 2008 /  #26
które stały w kącie koło łóżka?

Gezz, if they were really 'standing' he must be a catch ;)
Dawid  
11 Nov 2008 /  #27
czy wyprałaś mi te skarpetki, które stały w kącie koło łóżka?

Have you washed those socks for me, which have been laying in the corner by the bed?

...najlepiej boso i w ciązy :)
hiyaxxx  
24 Mar 2009 /  #28
£ęgan
younger wop  
7 May 2009 /  #29
I found a Mother's Day card in Polish which says:
Specjalnie dla Ciebie
Najgoretsze pozdrowienia i zyczenia z okazji
Dnia Matki.

My mom still reads and speak Polish. What does this card say? How do I sign it "I Love You" and my name?
peter_olsztyn 6 | 1,098  
7 May 2009 /  #30
Specjalnie dla Ciebie

Especially for you

Najgoretsze pozdrowienia i zyczenia z okazji

Warmest regards and wishes in

Dnia Matki

Mothers Day

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