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Typical rate for 1-on-1 English lessons in Poland (Krakow)?


lukaszpoznanski 10 | 39
28 Feb 2010 #1
What do native English speakers typically charge for one-on-one private lessons? Assume I'm doing this in Krakow and speak intermediate Polish with full comprehension.

Thanks in advance!
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859
28 Feb 2010 #2
Buddy up with a native english speaker trying to learn Polish. Meet up online using Skype. You help him/her with their Polish and vice versa.
OP lukaszpoznanski 10 | 39
28 Feb 2010 #3
Allow me to clarify. I am a native English speaker, and I'm interested in teaching privately on a one-on-one basis.

What do native English speakers (who also speak intermediate Polish) in Krakow typically charge?
Arien 3 | 721
28 Feb 2010 #4
Buddy up with a native english speaker trying to learn Polish. Meet up online using Skype. You help him/her with their Polish and vice versa.

Absolutely. If that doesn't work and you get *really* desperate, you can always ask strangers on an internet forum what to charge for your private lessons.

;P
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859
28 Feb 2010 #5
Sorry, my mistake. There is a user on here by the name of Seanus, he is an english teacher. Maybe PM him.
OP lukaszpoznanski 10 | 39
28 Feb 2010 #6
Absolutely. If that doesn't work and you get *really* desperate, you can always ask strangers on an internet forum what to charge for your private lessons. ;P

Haha good eye. But seriously, any idea?
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
28 Feb 2010 #7
Hmm. For someone qualified, anything between 30-50PLN an hour is normal. It does depend, but I'd be realistic and say that 40PLN an hour (for them coming to you) is normal, achievable and honest.

But it's really dependent - the market is subject to such wide variation that it's impossible to tell.

One thing with Krakow - the competition is intense. Lots and lots and lots of people are either teaching there or want to be teaching there - so you may find that it's very difficult to find clients in the beginning. You should also be aware that relying on private lessons is a dangerous game - certainly, don't rely on them to pay your rent!
Matowy - | 295
28 Feb 2010 #8
Speculatively, I can't imagine it being that expensive.
Arien 3 | 721
28 Feb 2010 #9
Haha good eye. But seriously, any idea?

Good to see you have a sense of humour man! I have no idea, but you should definitely charge whatever someone else is charging for the same services. Maybe you could google and check out what prices the competition has to offer? That should give you a reasonable indication.

:)
OP lukaszpoznanski 10 | 39
28 Feb 2010 #10
One thing with Krakow - the competition is intense. Lots and lots and lots of people are either teaching there or want to be teaching there - so you may find that it's very difficult to find clients in the beginning. You should also be aware that relying on private lessons is a dangerous game - certainly, don't rely on them to pay your rent!

Hmm - ok this is a little scary then. Am I crazy to just show up in Krakow next month and hope to find teaching work, either privately or for a school?

I have six months' experience teaching English as a volunteer (part-time), and a university degree in I.T., but no ESL certs.

Thoughts?
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
28 Feb 2010 #11
I have no idea, but you should definitely charge whatever someone else is charging for the same services.

Without a shadow of a doubt. But the problem in Krakow in particular is that there's no short of natives to take lessons - and - unfortunately, no shortage of native English speakers willing to take them for peanuts. In other cities, the problem isn't so bad - but Krakow, and to a lesser extent, Wroclaw, suffer from being very attractive for native English speakers and thus prices are absolutely variable.

But if you can set yourself up as someone who can get the job done, who knows things and is willing to be pedantic about the slightest points in English (Harry, I'm looking at you) - then you can name your price.
OP lukaszpoznanski 10 | 39
28 Feb 2010 #12
Thank you for all of your input DD. Am I correct to understand that you teach ESL in Poland? Do you have any colleagues at Krakow schools that might be interested in hiring a motivated and paedantic teacher? :)
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
28 Feb 2010 #13
Am I correct to understand that you teach ESL in Poland?

Sort of, sort of not - I teach some corporate clients, but it's mostly Business English and not 'real' English teaching. Used to teach in a school which used several different approaches, but teaching in a real school wasn't for me!

Alas, I'm in Poznan and don't know anyone in Krakow - my suggestion is simply to come on over, get a qualification and hit the streets. It should be no problem for a freshly qualified teacher to pick up hours in August in Krakow :)
Bzibzioh
28 Feb 2010 #14
lukaszpoznanski
One word of advise, if I may: keep your lefties views to yourself while in Poland, and especially in Kraków which is very conservative city. Don't you ever dare criticizing late pope John Paul II: you will find yourself very lonely.
Matowy - | 295
28 Feb 2010 #15
Kraków being a metropolitan and highly cultured European city, I can't envision much conservatism. I could be in for some disillusioning, though.
OP lukaszpoznanski 10 | 39
28 Feb 2010 #16
my suggestion is simply to come on over, get a qualification and hit the streets. It should be no problem for a freshly qualified teacher to pick up hours in August in Krakow :)

Thanks DD. I think I'll do exactly that. I was hoping to find work without spending time and money on certification, but perhaps that's not realistic. Any idea what the cheapest and fastest course available in Krakow might be?

One word of advise, if I may: keep your lefties views to yourself while in Poland, and especially in Kraków which is very conservative city. Don't you ever dare criticizing late pope John Paul II: you will find yourself very lonely.

I do appreciate the advice, and I'll keep all of that in mind. However, I'm sure that in a city of a million people, I'll meet some open-minded people who share my views.

Speaking of Pope John Paul II, did you know that he made a Saint out of the notorious 16th-century torturer Thomas More, who burned people alive for possessing English-language copies of the Bible?
Bzibzioh
28 Feb 2010 #17
Have I mentioned that I'm from Kraków, too? Seriously man, grow up.
OP lukaszpoznanski 10 | 39
28 Feb 2010 #18
"Grow up"? I've simply stated a historical fact. Thomas More was made a Saint by John Paul II. Interestingly, he made the notorious burner and torturer the Patron Saint of Politicians.
beelzebub - | 444
28 Feb 2010 #19
You stated a "fact" to try and antagonize people who don't think like you. Pope John Paul II was a great man. Did a lot of great things. Whether or not you believe in his religion or politics he was a far better man than most who walk this earth. So have some respect and stop trying to pick and choose your "facts"

I'm not even Catholic and I find him a very good and honorable person.
dcchris 8 | 432
28 Feb 2010 #20
relying on private lessons is a dangerous game

good advice. Charge at least 1zl per minute net for business clients. Otherwise some discount is good for students. One way to keep private students is the have them pay one month in advance.
Harry
28 Feb 2010 #21
Harry, I'm looking at you) - then you can name your price

125zl per 60 minutes is what I'm taking from the few students I still teach (have moved on to other things but still do a bit of teaching so as to keep my eye in).
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
28 Feb 2010 #22
Kraków being a metropolitan and highly cultured European city, I can't envision much conservatism. I could be in for some disillusioning, though.

Actually - the Krakow that tourists see is different to Krakow as a whole. Look at the recent election results - it's a solid PiS voting area. In terms of being liberal, Poznan and Wroclaw are much, much more Western. For an expat, it's a non-issue - but it's true, they're quite a conservative place. However, the counter-culture is much more developed than in Poznan/Wroclaw - probably because there's not much to rebel against here ;)

Thanks DD. I think I'll do exactly that. I was hoping to find work without spending time and money on certification, but perhaps that's not realistic. Any idea what the cheapest and fastest course available in Krakow might be?

It depends on many things - if you're willing to come to Krakow and just hit the streets without a qualification, you can find work - don't believe that a qualification is absolutely mandatory, because it's frankly not. But it can help you considerably - especially in a place like Krakow where there is competition for work. Really, it all depends on what you want to do - it's perfectly possibly to have a good life without it, just that the better jobs won't want you.

The only course worth considering is the CELTA, which you can do in either Warsaw, Krakow or Wroclaw. The Krakow course has been getting bad reviews online lately, but I don't know anymore than that. The Wroclaw course is highly reputable. Pricewise, you're looking at about 3000PLN or so, and time, 4 weeks.

Really, it's up to you - all I can say is that for the best results, you want to come in August to find work. Don't expect to find a job offer online - it rarely happens, and very often, there turns out to be major problems as a result.
superuser1999 12 | 41
4 Sep 2014 #23
Merged: How much should I charge for 1 on 1 Conversational English Lessons in Krakow?

I am a native English speaker and would like to offer English lessons in Krakow,
both conversational and grammar lessons,
How much should i charge per hour in zloty ?

any suggestions on price?
Luss
4 Sep 2014 #24
Depends on, how good you are, experiences, certificates, and not forgetting your competitors, ultimately: how much you think you are worth..
smudge
5 Sep 2014 #25
Krakow is a real mixed bag as its very popular with expats, which means a lot of people with no experience turn up trying to teach and lower their prices when people stop using them because the suck. I've seen individual lessons advertisements as low as 20pln or the other end of the spectrum you have experienced teachers, with real qualifications (not weekend/online tefl)and experience and won't get out of bed for less than 70pln and they don't need to advertise
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
5 Sep 2014 #26
Answers about teaching in Krakow (conversational stuff might not be the same, I don't know) were given on this thread previously.

Prices ranged from 1 zl per minute or 60 zl per hour to 125 zl per hour for an experienced teacher (a few years back, but prices probably came down).
whimsicaleight 1 | 2
21 Nov 2014 #27
I would say around $25 a hour. Not any more than that. That is what I would pay
jon357 67 | 17,053
21 Nov 2014 #28
Depends on, how good you are, experiences, certificates, and not forgetting your competitors, ultimately: how much you think you are worth..

Yep, that and the market - there's a lot of competition in Krakow.

I would say around $25 a hour. Not any more than that. That is what I would pay

Way too high, unless he's a first class teacher.

prices probably came down

They did, sadly.

conversational and grammar lessons,

Remember that conversational lessons aren't an easier option - the good ones are harder to do and can take more planning and specialised techniques. Rewarding when you see their progress, but you do have to know exactly what progress you want them to make, which threads and triggers you're going to use (and each student is different) and exactly how you're going to ensure they make it.
PoznSco
11 May 2015 #29
Merged: English Lessons Charges in Poland

How much would I be able to charge for one to one english lessons in Poznan?
Roger5 1 | 1,457
11 May 2015 #30
That depends on who you are and what you can offer. Spelling English with a lower case e doesn't bode well!


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