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Recruitement Process / Interview with an IT company in Poland


Doabl 1 | 2
3 Oct 2015  #1
Hi all ,

i applied for a job recently and i got to go through many interviews.
i am still waiting for their decision.
it's been nearly a month that i don't hear from them ??? does recruitment process take long time ( i am not an EU citizen ...so i need working visa and resident permit) ?

what a good net salary can i negotiate once i will be hired ?

it is an IT company ( well known ) .

thank you for your help.

Regards
DominicB - | 2,678
3 Oct 2015  #2
ALWAYS assume that they are 100% not interested in you until they tell you that you are definitely hired. NEVER wait for an employer to make a decision. NEVER, EVER trust them when they say they will get back to you soon. ALWAYS assume they won't. ALWAYS continue looking for a better job, even AFTER you get hired. NEVER take a rest. Like a shark, you have to swim at all times, or else die. NEVER put your eggs in one basket, and ALWAYS cast your net very wide.

If you haven't heard from them in a month, two at the outside, it is a very safe bet that they have completely forgotten that you even exist.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,653
3 Oct 2015  #3
ALWAYS continue looking for a better job, even AFTER you get hired.

Not a good idea. Someone that moves on very quickly too often (it can happen once, more than once is a bad sign) will have question marks over their commitment to a company and will find their career stalling.

There's no such thing as a "job for life", but the average employer would be very suspicious of someone that jumped from job to job like that.
OP Doabl 1 | 2
4 Oct 2015  #4
Hi again

thank you for advices .

that's pretty sad if HR department doesn't provide feedback after interviews in a timely manner : candidates can't wait all this time to get an answer - they must be more professional and respect their deadlines.

i am still searching other opportunities but it seems to be the same HR behavior in Poland - maybe some other companies are dealing more professional with candidates : who knows !!!!
bakkalgazi 2 | 21
4 Oct 2015  #5
I think you can send mail and ask about process
OP Doabl 1 | 2
4 Oct 2015  #6
it's already done

Hi all ,

do you know how much they pay for a team leader with foreign language ( with experience for up to 7years in team management ) ?

thank you
DominicB - | 2,678
8 Oct 2015  #7
Why don't you ask the company you are applying to? The only figure that counts is how much they are willing to offer you. "Averages" and "ballpark estimates" are quite useless when only specifics count.

Also, insist that they make an offer, and never let them pressure you into telling them what your salary expectations are. That is absolutely none of their business. ALWAYS throw that ball back in their court. And ALWAYS take your time responding to any offer. If they try to pressure you, then you can safely assume that the company is a lousy place to work. You will rarely, if ever, be wrong.
Angry Pole
8 Oct 2015  #8
Hi DominicB,

With all due respect, what you suggesting regarding salary estimates would rarely work. The only thing you will achieve by standing your ground and refusing to disclose your salary expectations is that they will just exclude you from hiring process. Reputable firms always have a bunch of good candidates to choose from, so they wouldn't bother. Much easier way to deal with this unpleasant situation as per my experience is just to name a really huge figure that you would accept without hesitation (it should be realistic though) and to mention that it's negotiable indeed. In this case they will get back to you really quickly with a figure that they are keeping in mind and that you both will be able to negotiate around.
DominicB - | 2,678
8 Oct 2015  #9
Much easier way to deal with this unpleasant situation as per my experience is just to name a really huge figure that you would accept without hesitation

Naming a figure is always a damned if you undershoot, damned if you overshoot proposition. There is basically no right answer to the question, and any answer you give can and will be held against you, so best to kick the ball back in their court without answering at all, because it is never in your best interest to reveal that information.

If they are truly interested in hiring you, they will make an offer without any hesitation. If not, they won't, which means that you lost exactly nothing.

Also, you are correct in calling this an unpleasant situation. One should seriously consider if they really want to work for a company that puts them in an unpleasant situation and puts them at an extremely unfair disadvantage during, or even before, the initial interview. It's probably a sign of things to come.
Angry Pole
8 Oct 2015  #10
Quite frankly I've never encountered a company that wasn't asking this question. And some of them were pretty decent in all the other aspects. So I wouldn't dramatize it much. And also I think that overshooting wouldn't do you any harm. You anyways should have a rough idea of the salary that you can get on the position. Just add 30-40% and give them that number, mentioning it's negotiable. And you should be safe and sound.

Also the thing is that it's hard to imagine the situation when a company is "truly interested" in hiring someone. If the company is decent enough it will always have an array of decent enough candidates to choose from. It's just the matter of who fits best. But in almost any situation they can easily pass and loose nothing on that. So if the candidate is giving them a hard time stepping outside the process they are accustomed too it's way easier for them just to take the path of least resistance.
DominicB - | 2,678
8 Oct 2015  #11
Quite frankly I've never encountered a company that wasn't asking this question.

They ask, if course. It does, after all, give them an enormous advantage in negotiations, and I can't blame them for asking. But the honest ones do not insist or hold it against you if you kick the ball back in their court. I would be very wary of an employer who did. That would mean that they want not only an advantage, but an unfair advantage.

And also I think that overshooting wouldn't do you any harm. You anyways should have a rough idea of the salary that you can get on the position.

Overshooting is just as bad as undershooting, and it is often difficult, and even impossible, for a job candidate to even make an educated guess about what the employer is willing to offer. Making an educated guess is always a foolish move when you can just ask outright. An honest employer will have nothing to hide and disclose it without hesitation.

Sorry, but being the first to disclose a figure always diminishes or utterly destroys the job candidate's ability to negotiate. Like I said, it can, and always will, be used against them not only in the hiring process, but for the duration of their employ.

It's just a big game of "I'll blow you if you blow me first", and we all know who loses.
xerxes88
10 Oct 2015  #12
When I buy a computer and I ask how much it is the shop doesn't ask what I am prepared to pay. A person will be earning a salary and they will inevitably want to earn more so they must have a salary expectation. Also the company usually has a range and the higher amount will be for the most perfect candidate in terms of personality traits, experience and skills. These will often only be ascertained in an interview. It's a real waste of everyone's time if at interview the candidate decides to give a wild salary expectation. So if someone refused to give a salary expectation most employers would probably not employ them. I'm talking here about professional jobs where a salary will vary and there will be different grades. Giving someone the advice to refuse to give a salary expectation is setting them up for failure in the job hunting process. I understand the points about negotation etc but it's not relevant. If a candidate is changing sectors and for some reason doesn't have first hand knowledge of salaries in this sector, but does their research and confidently gives their salary exepctation and this is in line with the market this shows that they are knowledgeable about the sector. If this is an entry level job or a transactional type job, the salary will be fixed and the employer should really just state it.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,653
10 Oct 2015  #13
If a candidate is changing sectors and for some reason doesn't have first hand knowledge of salaries in this sector, but does their research and confidently gives their salary exepctation and this is in line with the market this shows that they are knowledgeable about the sector.

What I did once was to find some supporting evidence (research, published surveys, etc) and offered them in the middle of the lowest and highest salaries quoted, to reflect the fact that I wasn't the strongest candidate but also to show that I wanted more than the minimum.


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