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Average monthly salary in Poland is around 1000 PLN (few hundred bucks).


landora - | 199
9 Mar 2010 #151
Michael James Forbes

It's a typical Asian name, isn't it, Fuzzywickets? :D
bimber94 7 | 254
9 Mar 2010 #152
Tell you what - next expat meeting we have in Poznan, you should come along.

I can just imagine all forum members having a party. We'd probably all end up killing each other in five minutes.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,454
9 Mar 2010 #153
Not really, because keyboard warriors wouldn't show up.

But then again, they're all welcome THIS SATURDAY in Poznan - details in the Meetup section :)
Insane2
14 Mar 2010 #154
actually the average salary is about 1150 PLN, not just 1000 PLN.

Still very very low of course, it's hard to live with just 250 euros per month
Harry
14 Mar 2010 #155
actually the average salary is about 1150 PLN, not just 1000 PLN.

Legal minimum wage in Poland in 2010 is 1317zl a month.
milky 13 | 1,657
14 Mar 2010 #156
Most people i know in Poland are on less than 1500 zloty a month...Something will have to give over there or the country will slide into mass chronic depression. I get depressed when i go there and see how they live.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
14 Mar 2010 #157
Yeah, you can see the depression on the faces of many too. It's only going to get worse as the rich try to get richer and rip off the poor. Trust me, there are those here that will do just that.
milky 13 | 1,657
14 Mar 2010 #158
The small farms of the east will go belly up very very soon and when all the money Poles got from working abroads runs out...?? I reckon the next couple of years will be hard over there but i dont think they will sink like Titanic Ireland.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
14 Mar 2010 #159
Exactly, investing in the future needs to be considered more. Many will lose out and if half a million move back......
milky 13 | 1,657
14 Mar 2010 #160
I have a couple of polish mate who went home 3 years ago and they have found no work,,all the offers they got were bordering on slavery and comming back to Ireland or britain is no longer an option so i reckon they could be back to square one again.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
14 Mar 2010 #161
You really have to help yourself these days in Poland. They should be fine as Poles know how to be rugged and tenacious, hard-nosed even if need be.
milky 13 | 1,657
14 Mar 2010 #162
Maybe but i have a farmer friend whose hops devalued this year by 75% and at least in the Lublin area this is the case all over. I dont know what they are going to do. The Farms are so small that even if they were to sell up it would be worthless.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
14 Mar 2010 #163
I'm surprised that it hasn't already happened. They are at the mercy of EU pricing strategies and can be driven out. It shouldn't be allowed as they provide some excellent produce.
milky 13 | 1,657
14 Mar 2010 #164
The brewerys are now using chemicals instead of hops..and also china has robbed the strawberries market.. The EU is turning a blind eye and the POlish MEP's well the less said about them the better..
delphiandomine 88 | 18,454
14 Mar 2010 #165
The Farms are so small

And herein lies the problem - why should I subsidise small farms when bigger farms (as even admitted by "Rural Solidarity" at one point) are more efficient?

Let's not forget that Poland should be getting 100% of the CAP money due soon.

I have a couple of polish mate who went home 3 years ago and they have found no work,,all the offers they got were bordering on slavery and comming back to Ireland or britain is no longer an option so i reckon they could be back to square one again.

This is true. I know quite a few Polish people who won't employ someone who's worked in the UK if they didn't do something relevant to their trade - what use is 3 years washing dishes to someone who wants a plumber?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
14 Mar 2010 #166
We differ a little here, delph. I believe that the industry attempts, or should attempt, to benefit all and this is where my socialist side kicks in. Yes, there are winners and losers but I feel that this reality is better placed elsewhere. Agricultural produce benefits the majority and it is in the collective interest to protect those smaller farms that often provide for local communities.

If those smaller farms are provided with the tools to become more competitive, perhaps through incentive-based schemes, and they fail then it's more acceptable if they fall by the wayside but agricultural concerns occupy and have occupied a prominent place in Polish society and life. Give them hope first, then see!
milky 13 | 1,657
14 Mar 2010 #167
Relavant to there trade?? Dishes?? The people i know worked in their trade in Ireland and other jobs.. They could not even find a dish washing job when they returned home.
bolek 6 | 330
14 Mar 2010 #168
Trust me, there are those here that will do just that.

Have to agree on this one, one wonders why some businessmen are dealt with by their workers, a couple of broken legs and a knuckle sandwich just might solve this problem.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
14 Mar 2010 #169
Well, maybe not that extreme but some more sticking up for themselves and putting their character into sth wouldn't go amiss. It's their defeatist attitude that counts against them. Some more zip and determination would stand them in better stead.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,454
14 Mar 2010 #170
Have to agree on this one, one wonders why some businessmen are dealt with by their workers, a couple of broken legs and a knuckle sandwich just might solve this problem.

Probably because a worker on minimum wage that does such a thing is not only going to find himself in trouble with the law, but also likely to find a few tougher thugs on his tail. Who are the police going to side with, the minimum wage worker, or the rich businessman?

Well, maybe not that extreme but some more sticking up for themselves and putting their character into sth wouldn't go amiss. It's their defeatist attitude that counts against them. Some more zip and determination would stand them in better stead.

I think a great deal of the problem is caused by the way that Solidarity (and their ilk) are only interested in their own - if you've got a moustache and work in Ciegelski, of course they'll help you. But if you're just an ordinary worker in an ordinary company, you've got no chance - and this is shameful.

The funny thing to me is that on paper, Polish laws are stronger than UK laws!
milky 13 | 1,657
14 Mar 2010 #171
Anyway the wages over there are sh1te and the house prices are a joke..What will happen in the future will be decided as usual by market forces and its so called invisible hand. The Polish like us all will have to take a back seat and watch the chaos.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,883
14 Mar 2010 #172
milky wrote:

the house prices are a joke

indeed.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
14 Mar 2010 #173
There is a self-centred and hard-done-by attitude. Many are begrudging in plying their trade and a day is like a chore. When some overcome their self piteous mentality, they may stand a chance.

Property prices are a joke here, period!! Poland is the first country to have invented the 60-year mortgage ;0 ;) ;)
Trevek 26 | 1,702
14 Mar 2010 #174
- If you take into account the social insourance as well as the taxes then the taxation rate here is c.a. 40%. Which - ofcourse ought to be reduced - if the taxation made by the social insourence agency (ZUS) would be reduced by 1/2 then a lot of people would come out of the black economy..

Worth considering that in many jobs (even low paid ones) the employers want the workers to be self-employed (one-man firm) so they don't have to pay ZUS etc. That automatically costs the worker over 800 a month in ZUS.
bolek 6 | 330
14 Mar 2010 #175
Probably because a worker on minimum wage that does such a thing is not only going to find himself in trouble with the law, but also likely to find a few tougher thugs on his tail. Who are the police going to side with, the minimum wage worker, or the rich businessman?

I'm not one for violence, but when you see a business man pays somebody a low wage and then fails to pay on time saying he was no money, that person is a scum. One wonders why the government and solidarity don't step in. The price of homes in Poland are a joke, but if you build yourself it so much cheaper.
milky 13 | 1,657
14 Mar 2010 #176
I know a guy who built a small two story wooden house in POland 6 months ago.It cost him 75000 Euro.(4 rooms). Thats still a huge amount of money in a country with such small wages.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
14 Mar 2010 #177
I don't understand your post, if the guy built a house for that price, surely he could afford it or was able to get a mortgage?
milky 13 | 1,657
14 Mar 2010 #178
He could afford it because he saved up the money in England but my point is that this is still alot of money for a tiny wooden house in a country were the majority earn about 100 euro a week.Maybe he got a bad deal..
bolek 6 | 330
15 Mar 2010 #179
I know a guy who built a small two story wooden house in POland 6 months ago.It cost him 75000 Euro.(4 rooms). Thats still a huge amount of money in a country with such small wages.

Smart person, the place will probally be on the market for 800,000 zlote, the banks lend money to citizens building at the rate that every square metre of building cost 2000zl!

Lets get serious, people complain of low wages but one of my friend gas bill for dec/jan was in excess of 1700zl. (apartment about 80sqm)

I wonder how people pay for heating during winter, nothing ceases to amaze me when it comes to wages/cost in Poland.
jonni 16 | 2,485
15 Mar 2010 #180
earn about 100 euro a week

230 euro per week is the national median weekly wage - that includes Plebsville, PL - the median is half as much again here in Warsaw.


Home / Work / Average monthly salary in Poland is around 1000 PLN (few hundred bucks).
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