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Monthly income for family - Warsaw


LwowskaKrakow 28 | 431
6 Nov 2011 #31
How does July25 communicate with her teachers if she herself doesn't speak Polish? I

That's an excellent point, she would have to find a public school with teachers who speak English too . No sure it is uncommon or common but once again my question is why would it be more unthinkable for an English speaking mum to send her children to a non English speaking place in Poland than it would be for a Vietnamese mum or Indian or Syrian mum to do so ?

I have friends who relocated to Peru for work and my girlfriend sent her 2 toddlers to a local peruvian school (she does speak Spanish though) and the children are very happy according to her ,her boy and her girl adapted well and became bilingual in 1 year.

She was not asking for a specific treatment for her and for them because they are not from Peru and did not speak the language or knew the culture well.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,846
6 Nov 2011 #32
Sure it would be fine if the kids were relatively tiny, like under about 8, they would learn the language in no time.
With older kids it could be a disaster with no learning support.
On the other hand, at least they would learn a language (eventually)
Schools are teaching precious little anyway, I have two kids and the only one who is learning anything is the one who needs extra help.

The 'bright' one learns NOTHING apart from in language classes.
So maybe I will move to some country that would do them a favour linguistically.
One could always find a private home tutor for after school help for the first few months.
As for the mother's language problem, hey, she could always learn the language.
Zman
6 Nov 2011 #33
I had a finnish friend in my (public) primary school more than 25 years ago. His parents spoke no polish. Somehow he managed to be a very likable person who became fluent in polish (until this day) and who got a "wzorowy uczeń" badge by grade 6. Children adapt fast.
pip 10 | 1,659
6 Nov 2011 #34
this is not entirely a language issue. If her husband is only doing a contract - something like 3 to 5 years- having your kids totally immersed in a language only to have to move again is a bit of a waste.

I also have an issue with the quality of teachers and the fact that they make so little- they don't have incentive to be their best.

My daughter used to go to school with a girl whose mother was belgian and father is irish. within 6 months she spoke fluent polish. it is amazing how fast kids pick up the language- this is not the whole issue, however.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,846
6 Nov 2011 #35
3 to 5 years- having your kids totally immersed in a language only to have to move again is a bit of a waste.

not sure how that would be a 'waste' ...would have thought that after 3 to 5 years they would be fluent, and have a real lifelong skill.
OP juli25 5 | 22
6 Nov 2011 #36
The quality of a a public shool in Warsaw should work with the location, if your pick up an up market neighbourghood the local schools should be good.

which neighbourhoods in Warsaw are considered good for families with children? can you recommend please?
pip 10 | 1,659
6 Nov 2011 #37
wilanow and konstancin have the most expats.

zoliborz is also a good area
JonnyM 11 | 2,620
6 Nov 2011 #38
Wilanów and Konstancin are fine but very much for people who like driving, especially in the case of Konstancin which someone could easily find themself isolated in. Sadyba (between the centre and Wilanow ) is also a good bet as is Zoliborz. Lots of young families in Tarchomin but it's a bit dull. The posh parts of Bielany is nice but it's hard to find better than Saska Kepa. Near the centre yet. Somehow not inner city, safe, cosmopolitan, good schools and a higher than average chance of nice neighbours.
pip 10 | 1,659
6 Nov 2011 #39
actually, I really like Kabaty. It has a great feel to it. Young families, cultural mix (as mixed as it gets here), loads of shops, good parks for kids and on the metro line- so you don't even need a car. Also loads of bike paths and close to the forest for walks -you will surely find a place there to accommodate your family.
CheFinny 5 | 45
6 Nov 2011 #40
None - they'll be treated as a Polish child would be treated, except possibly without the threat of being sent to a special school (like what happens to Roma children).

thats a shame. I know several public schools in the Belfast employed a Polish national to teach Polish kids and help the little ones through the transition.

As Poland is a take, take, take society though I am not surprised they don't do ANYTHING to help tax payers children assimilate.
pip 10 | 1,659
6 Nov 2011 #41
thats a shame. I know several public schools in the Belfast employed a Polish national to teach Polish kids and help the little ones through the transition.

this is a very valid point.
wielki pan 2 | 250
7 Nov 2011 #42
a) You know nothing about Poland and things Polish. Have you even been here?b) The original poster said nothing at all about her tastes, expensive or otherwise. Clearly you are jealous that some people make money which you can only dream of

Q1, Yes

Q2, Yes
kirka
7 Nov 2011 #43
juli25
Children will definitely adapt quickly to the new environment. They will also learn the language very quickly. But I totally agree with you that it will not be a pleasant experience for them. They will very insecure & during this adaptation period they will be very cranky & cry for every small thing. I have experienced this when we moved within the same country but having a different language.

Also in my opinion, if you are planning to settle down in Poland or stay here for a long duration, then it makes sense to send them to public schools. Else I think it would be better to send them to a school where English is the medium of intruction.
theKNOWLEDGE
8 Nov 2011 #44
thats a shame. I know several public schools in the Belfast employed a Polish national to teach Polish kids and help the little ones through the transition.

Sure, but that's because it was the norm, rather than something exceptional. No public Polish school would have the money to do such a thing.

As Poland is a take, take, take society though I am not surprised they don't do ANYTHING to help tax payers children assimilate.

It's not that, but rather a simple by-product of a system which produces "one-size-fits-all" children.

And in all fairness - many people (myself included) wouldn't be too happy about precious resources being used to help children who have parents that can pay, anyway. There are more important things to spend money on, such as the provision of education to special needs children from poor backgrounds. When we can cater for them properly, then we can worry about providing some expat children with help.
Wedle 16 | 496
8 Nov 2011 #45
so I understand that I have to start looking for good public school, if looking realistically on the numbers...private schools we won't be able to cover

First thing first juli25, choose the school then choose the area. How old are your children and are they boys or girls. There are some very good private schools in warsaw your child will get full support.
OP juli25 5 | 22
8 Nov 2011 #46
How old are your children and are they boys or girls. There are some very good private schools in warsaw your child will get full support.

Boy is 9.5 and girl is 7.5
which private schools we should consider? but again, from previous feedbacks I got an impression that no private schools are available under 2,000PLN/month/per child.

Is that is the minimum rate - our budget will not stand it :-(
LwowskaKrakow 28 | 431
8 Nov 2011 #47
July25 ,I would recommend Mokotow ,that' s where my Warsaw friends were raised, it is near Park Lazienki and very convenient.
This private school 's fees are about 1500 zl a month ( but includes everything, tuition meals snacks etc)
teczowyogrod.com.pl/szkola/oferta,platnosci,24.html

Otherwise there are public schools like this one which looks perfectly fine to me but it is 100% Polish instruction(school 212 Krystyna Krahelska):

sp212.szkolnastrona.pl/o-szkole,m,mg,2.html

I would put the children at a good Polish public school, they will be quiet in classes and absorb the linguistic and cultural Polish data for some months /1 year then they ll be like every Polish child. If It does not work you can always ask them if they want to switch or if they are ok.

With the money saved you may supplement their integration by hiring a private Polish instructor , this should be easy to find in Warsaw and spoilt the kids a bit with fun activities litlle trips horse riding you name it so that they enjoy Poland.

All the best
pip 10 | 1,659
8 Nov 2011 #48
I have never heard of the above private school- I am not saying it is bad, I have just never heard of it.
The interesting thing is that a few people are giving you advice but don't have kids and speak Polish. When I moved to Warsaw from Canada, my Polish was limited and I had a 3 year old. (I have 2 kids now).

Poland doesn't help foreigners to assimilate. Survival of the fittest. It can get very lonely as a parent- even going for coffee with an English speaking person who relates to your situation can help.

If you put your kids in public school- it will be difficult for the whole family- not to mention stressful for you not being able to communicate the most basic things- you have less of a chance to meet people in your situation.

A private school, perhaps the one linked above, in my opinion, is a better option for you- at least in the beginning. You have the chance to meet other foreigners and your kids will integrate better. However, the majority of those children at the school will probably be Polish- but at least they will know the language and your kids will be able to communicate.

There are a few groups you can join- mums and tots warsaw- I don't have a link but just google it and it will pop up. They are moms in exactly the same situation as you.

15,000 pln per month is a great salary and moving to Poland will give your kids a great learning experience and broaden their worlds- however, the goal is to lessen the amount of stress.

I have done what you are about to do. I can relate and I can tell you what to expect. Many of the other, so called experts here actually have no clue- but they certainly offer their opinion.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,846
8 Nov 2011 #49
. Many of the other, so called experts here actually have no clue- but they certainly offer their opinion.

well, it is a public forum.
pip 10 | 1,659
8 Nov 2011 #50
pip: . Many of the other, so called experts here actually have no clue- but they certainly offer their opinion.

well, it is a public forum.

absolutely. But I have lived it.
Wedle 16 | 496
8 Nov 2011 #51
Boy is 9.5 and girl is 7.5 which private schools we should consider? but again, from previous feedbacks I got an impression that no private schools are available under 2,000PLN/month/per child.is that is the minimum rate - our budget will not stand it :-(

This a school you should consider

The prices are here: spchocimska.edu.pl/szkola-podstawowa/cennik/

The school has just recently started its a good location close to all the main parks. Quite a few kids from the British school began there Polish education in this school this year. There will be quite a few bi lingual kids around the same age as your. Most of the parents are professionals, quite a few Lawyers and accountants, they are also very flexible, English is second language and they are introducing Chinese, all language teachers are natives The second link is the price it is not expensive.

There are also two very good private all girls schools within a short distance that are very good.

If I was arriving in Warsaw with two young children today. This would be my school of choice. good luck

he third will require a kindergarten.

Juli25 - do not even bother looking at other Kindergartens put your youngest in here, if they have space: preschool.pl/index.php?pid=12

Both of my children went to this school, many of the children are bi lingual or native English.
pip 10 | 1,659
8 Nov 2011 #52
my eldest went here for a year. Not worth the money. I can highly recommend: heliantus.pl my youngest went here for three years, in fact the little blonde girl in the pink sweater on the home page is actually my kid. The owner is Polish but she lived in Chicago for many years. Many of the toys come from the U.S.- as the owners sister still lives there. There is also a teacher who is English speaking from Brazil.
theKNOWLEDGE
8 Nov 2011 #53
Not worth the money.

Especially if they're bothering with gimmicks like Chinese over hiring higher quality Polish teachers.
one wonders
8 Nov 2011 #54
Many of the other, so called experts here actually have no clue- but they certainly offer their opinion.

Lol... Pip, no point in giving a few ideas, I'll leave it all to you....
Wedle 16 | 496
8 Nov 2011 #55
my eldest went here for a year. Not worth the money

Thats a matter of opinion. Zawrat is the oldest and most established private Kindrgarten in Warsaw, no one has ever mentioned to me it is expensive, quite the opposite when the other options are the British school or the American school when it was in limanowskiego. The wonderful thing about IPW is the continuity of teachers and supports Pani Iza is a gem we have known her now for over 11 years and both my children still have fond memories of their kindergarten and international school friends.

gimmicks like Chinese over hiring higher quality Polish teachers.

They are not gimmicks it was at the request of the parents. The school is owned by Bednarska, once again a very established school, they don't need the gimmicks. In 1 to 2 years in will be one of the most sought after mixed private schools in Warsaw.

heliantus

Its in Ursynów though is it near the metro?

I understand now why Zawrat was not your thing, if you had to d the Pulawska run in the mornings.
pip 10 | 1,659
9 Nov 2011 #56
Its in Ursynów though is it near the metro?

It is in Jozefoslaw
Wedle 16 | 496
9 Nov 2011 #57
Unless you are living in the area, its a bit far out though

Poland doesn't help foreigners to assimilate. Survival of the fittest. It can get very lonely as a parent- even going for coffee with an English speaking person who relates to your situation can help.

Juli25, Pip has put across a very real fact regarding life in Poland. Most expats just come to Poland and think about the money. If this is your approach it will be at the cost of your children. Warsaw can be a wonderful stage in your kids development, there is a very good quality of life to be had here if you manage it well. There are so many extras ( affordable) for your kids that would be beyond you in the UK/USA. So you need to have a plan.

You can survive well with your family IF you are smart.

If you put your kids in public school- it will be difficult for the whole family- not to mention stressful for you not being able to communicate the most basic things- you have less of a chance to meet people in your situation.

I would agree with this 100%

15,000 pln per month is a great salary and moving to Poland will give your kids a great learning experience and broaden their worlds- however, the goal is to lessen the amount of stress.

I do not consider 15,000 PLN brutto, a great salary if you have to include the following:

Apartment/House
School x 3
Medical insurance
Car
Travel.

It would be better to negotiate your husbands package inclusive of,

Apartment/house
School x3
Medical insurance ( Medicover/ Bupa- full cover ) do not go for the basic package.
Car

and accept a lower Gross salary.

In my opinion a family of 5 would need a minimum of 7,000 PLN netto monthly - not inclusive of( Apartment/house, School x3, Medical insurance, Car) to have an acceptable lifestyle in Warsaw.
pip 10 | 1,659
9 Nov 2011 #58
agreed
CheFinny 5 | 45
9 Nov 2011 #59
And in all fairness - many people (myself included) wouldn't be too happy about precious resources being used to help children who have parents that can pay, anyway.

You have just highlighted my point. I know two schools in my city that ran a class with a Polish national as the teacher so as to smooth the transition for the Polish children. This was paid for by the tax payer (including the parents of the children). This left the Poles free to use their own money differently and make life a little easier.

These schools didnt HAVE to do this but they did because they are run by nice people in nice areas.
The idea of a Polish school stretching themseleves to do something like this is unfathomable and, sadly, it says a lot about this society and their take, take, take attitude towards its European neighbours.
pip 10 | 1,659
9 Nov 2011 #60
I don't disagree with you, entirely, however, the whole immigration thing is relatively new to Poland. I am always asked about the differences in the living conditions between Poland and Canada- people I just meet will ask me "what do you like better?" I can't answer that they both have their good and their bad. But I think Poland as a whole has always had an inferiority complex compared to the western world- and are quite used to Poles leaving for greener pastures, it is a bit strange to see people come to Poland....and of course if they do then they are thought to be rich westerners.

But don't forget, Polish teachers are poorly paid- so going above and beyond the call of duty is not normal.


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