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Would like to move back to Poland from New York after living in USA for 20 years.


Nanna 1 | 14
9 Mar 2012  #1
Hi Everyone, great forum.

About me...20 years ago, when I was a 15 year old girl, I emigrated to New York with my parents. I stayed there ever since. I attended NY high school and college, got a Bachelor's degree and stellar NYC corporate experience. Currently, I am contemplating on moving back to Poland for a one year on a trial period. I have been back to Poland on vacation many times but only during summer time. Except few days spent in Warsaw, I always stayed in the countrysides of north-east Poland (Masuria). The rest of Poland is not that familiar to me. Every time I visit Poland, it changes a bit. I speak Polish very well because it was spoken at home in New York and I read Polish books since I was a kid. I have no clue what I would do for income in Poland. I have dual citizenships. I thought about teaching English. I would like to stay within close range to Masuria (Mazury).

Possible target moving date is after Euro 2012 (July/August). (I am a single female, no kids. Not that it matters. Or maybe it does).

Now question for you: Would you move to Poland in 2012 for one year to see if life has a different meaning if you were in my place?

Thanks!
Nanna :)
Meathead 5 | 470
9 Mar 2012  #2
The only way to answer that is for you to move back to Poland. If you don't like it you can always move back to the states. The only thing I would add is that from my experience moving, is that traveling as a tourist is not like moving somewhere, they are entirely different experiences.
pip 10 | 1,661
9 Mar 2012  #3
There are many Polish moving back- what makes you different? You are well educated for one and have experience- try sending a cv to foreign companies that are in Poland- do it now, and see what response you get. Perhaps you can get hired by an American company and paid usd. Teaching English is hit or miss- many schools want qualified English teachers.
peterweg 36 | 2,316
9 Mar 2012  #4
Would you move to Poland in 2012 for one year to see if life has a different meaning if you were in my place?

Yes, why not.

I'd suggest Warsaw is close enough, best paid jobs. My father in law comes from Masuria and as much as a hardy forester he is, he did say it was too cold in winter there.
fringxx - | 30
9 Mar 2012  #5
I guess it could be an interesting experience for you to get back and see how life looks like in Poland and after this year you can always move back to NY, if you never try, you'll never know I suppose...
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,884
9 Mar 2012  #6
New York is an amazing city. No place else in the world like it. You move back to Poland, not only are you going to take several steps down in lifestyle, but you're going to realize how much you had in New York/USA and what you now don't have in Poland.

With all that NYC corporate experience you speak of, I can only assume you are successful. Why throw that all away on some fantasy of going back to the motherland? Teach English and live in some dank little apartment, working evenings, working nights, making crap money.....it makes no sense.

Your life is in America. Keep it that way and when you want to go to Poland, buy a plane ticket and go visit.
peter_olsztyn 6 | 1,098
9 Mar 2012  #7
If you are going to live here and spend your savings go and try. Otherwise don't move back.
We are still in the shrinking phase and no one knows what will happen soon. Rising costs of food and fuel impoverish people.
Imagine yourself pouring fuel for 1.75$ per litre ;)
teflcat 5 | 1,032
9 Mar 2012  #8
Teach English and live in some dank little apartment, working evenings, working nights, making crap money.....it makes no sense.

That sounds like the polar opposite of my life here as a teacher.
I'd advise the OP to find work with a foreign company before she comes. NE Poland won't have much to offer her, but with fluent Polish I'm confident she could find something elsewhere if she looks hard. As for teaching English, I'd avoid it in her case.
OP Nanna 1 | 14
9 Mar 2012  #9
Thanks for the replies thus far...can't wait to hear more feedback, especially from people from New York City and other Americans who now live in Warsaw.

New York is an amazing city. No place else in the world like it

Yes, New York City (quite different than the entire State of New York) is like no other place in the world...that's why I can't wait to leave. For me, it is certainly NOT the ultimate place to live, especially Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens or the Bronx.
polishmama 3 | 280
9 Mar 2012  #10
If I were you, I'd look into getting a job with a corporate firm in Poland for sure. Teaching English, or any language, isn't as easy as it seems. I've tutored English to a child who was born in Mexico and another child who was born and bred American. Not easy for sure and I don't think it's for everyone. Plus, it seems to me that you have other assets that you can use for a job other than teaching English.

Basically, if I were you and had a bit saved up, I would definitely try it for a year. Good luck!
delphiandomine 83 | 17,626
9 Mar 2012  #11
That sounds like the polar opposite of my life here as a teacher.

Opposite of mine too.
scottie1113 7 | 898
9 Mar 2012  #12
And mine as well.

Would you move to Poland in 2012 for one year to see if life has a different meaning if you were in my place?

Sure. Why not? Come for the experience if nothing else. If you're looking for work in your field, Mazury-however beautiful-won't offer much, and teaching opportunities there are also limited. If you plan to work while you're here, you'll probably have to move to a bigger city. If you don't have to work during your stay here, then go wherever your heart takes you.

Come to Poland. Enjoy the ride.
OP Nanna 1 | 14
9 Mar 2012  #13
Come to Poland. Enjoy the ride.

Thank you for your positive and uplifting reply! I do have to work. I am targeting Warsaw for job opportunities in marketing. I speak excellent Polish and excellent English. Mazury is 3-4 hour drive from Warsaw. I will go there to bike, hike and relax.
pam
9 Mar 2012  #14
i dont feel you would have too much to lose by giving poland a try. you obviously are not that happy in nyc, so take a break. if you dont go for it you will always think what if...as you are well qualified i am sure you wont have too much of a problem getting a job in poland. if you dont like it, am sure you wont find it too hard to get another job back in nyc.big plus is that you are fluent in both languages.however it will be ever so slightly different to usa!!!best of luck!!!
OP Nanna 1 | 14
9 Mar 2012  #15
best of luck!!!

Thank you! :)
Ziutek 9 | 160
9 Mar 2012  #16
My situation is a bit similar to yours but my connections to Poland are weaker. My father is polish but I was born in England and only started learning

the language two years ago. I worked in investment banking until fairly recently. I was getting pretty tired of the lifestyle in London and I have always

wanted to get to know another country as a resident rather than a tourist so I've decided emigrate! I haven't got a job lined up but I'm just going to take my chances.

I'm open to the idea that I might stay permanently but more likely it will just be for a year.
Frankly I'm terrified but really the worst than can happen is that I hate it and have to move back
to London. That would still be better than a lifetime of what ifs and at least I'll have some stories to tell ...
OP Nanna 1 | 14
9 Mar 2012  #17
My situation is a bit similar

I hear you...just like I am tired of the New York City lifestyle. What appeals to me right now is to work in small city (Warsaw to me is small comparing to Manhattan/NYC), then spend weekends on a farm close to nature. And explore more of Europe on the weekends. Eventually live a slower, simpler happy life. In my opinion, you don't need much to be happy. People, love and quality experiences in your life are more important than status and career. Sometimes in life you just have to take a jump.
scottie1113 7 | 898
10 Mar 2012  #18
People, love and quality experiences in your life are more important than status and career.

You nailed it. Take the jump. You only live once.
pam
10 Mar 2012  #19
Sometimes in life you just have to take a jump.

take the jump and enjoy. i am sure you will be fine. would kill to do what you are planning on doing,go for it!
Ziutek 9 | 160
10 Mar 2012  #20
Eventually live a slower, simpler happy life. In my opinion, you don't need much to be happy.

You put it so well and it sounds like you have made your decision. Good luck!
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,884
10 Mar 2012  #21
What appeals to me right now is to work in small city (Warsaw to me is small comparing to Manhattan/NYC), then spend weekends on a farm close to nature.

this is dangerous talk.

i know i know, the hustle and bustle of NYC has gotten to you and you feel like you need a change. at 35 and single, maybe you've had a failed relationship or two and a change of scenery is something you crave.....just keep in mind that once the honeymoon stage of going back to the motherland wears off, logic will start to win, as it always does one way or another. 20 years in the USA from the age of 15......you my friend are American with Polish blood and going to Poland, living in the boonies, teaching English (you'll be stuck with that unless you're willing to move to a major city......well.....cashier at Biedronka is always an option) is simply a recipe for problems. My 2 cents.

Anyone else notice that in her entire OP, she didn't have one good thing to say about Poland? Not one comparison was made originally, just a kinda, "yeah, thinking of doing it.....do i sound crazy?" This should not be overlooked. Take that for what it's worth.

And for those of you saying, "my life is the opposite", well, of course it is. You've been in Poland for years and you can't compare what your life is today to what her life will be for the first year in Poland. The OP was basically, "give it a year and see how it goes," and that's how I'm basing my opinion. She will take an enormous cut in pay and in lifestyle, live in a tiny little apartment and work mornings and nights to make ends meet. That's what first year ESL'ers do.

If NYC has grown old for you........move to another state! You've got the entire country at your disposal. Go live somewhere warmer. Go live somewhere slower. If you have as much corporate experience as you say you do, go use it elsewhere in the USA because even in today's economy, someone with years of NYC experience has plenty of work waiting for them throughout the country. Then again, I don't really know for sure how successful you are. All corporations in NYC have receptionists, too.

One last thing: I'm sure the smaller towns and cities are not as selective, but your English is not perfect, it's evident from your posts. Although you're what I'd consider fluent, you make typical Polish mistakes still and if you in fact did go to a major city, with no ESL experience to boot, you may struggle to find a job because there are Poles out there with absolutely stellar English skills that won't make the mistakes I'm seeing in your writing. Just sayin'.
Wroclaw Boy
10 Mar 2012  #22
im of the opinion that the biggest regret can often be not trying.
markskibniewski 3 | 200
10 Mar 2012  #23
If NYC has grown old for you........move to another state! You've got the entire country at your disposal.

Agree 100 %.

For me, it is certainly NOT the ultimate place to live, especially Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens or the Bronx.

I am curious why you say that. If you are living in the city and don't like it simply move to the suburbs. It is a much more relaxed lifestyle. I am not aware of your situation so I can only speculate. If you are concerned about money move south. Things are a hell of a lot cheaper in the south and is a slower pace as well. Personelly based on your experience you may wish to try just outside of Atlanta. Atlanta has boomed ever since the Olympics but has retreated a bit in recent years so you can get a real bargain for a house. Florida is another great option move just outside of Orlando and work in Orlando. I spent a couple years here after college and it was the best few years of my life. I currently live in NJ and understand about the hussle and bussle of the city. I wouldn't want to live there either.
aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
10 Mar 2012  #24
you make typical Polish mistakes still and if you in fact did go to a major city, with no ESL experience to boot, you may struggle to find a job because there are Poles out there with absolutely stellar English skills that won't make the mistakes I'm seeing in your writing.

yep, the best advice so far. Why not move to another country in Europe - it will be easier for you to travel around within the EU and land a better paying job, so you can visit Poland while living there. I would suggest Germany, Berlin in particular since its a fairly multicultural city. Sounds like you need a change of scene, but you need to have a plan A, B and C. I have moved across the pond and it is not an easy as it may seem. Give up the idea that Poland is a romantic place where people have a relaxed life style- that is not the case anymore, not that it has ever been.

Good luck and make sure that you land a job before departing. That always helps. Living in a new country takes some adjusting and adjusting to a Western European country will be way easier for you then adjusting to a Polish reality.
OP Nanna 1 | 14
10 Mar 2012  #25
Where do you live fuzzy? And why such negative view of Poland? Just sayin'....
pam
10 Mar 2012  #26
And for those of you saying, "my life is the opposite", well, of course it is. You've been in Poland for years and you can't compare what your life is today to what her life will be for the first year in Poland

you have made a couple of valid points, but you cant say for sure what her life will be like for the first year.without doubt, she will probably be taking a huge paycut, and living in inferior accommodation compared to what she is used to in nyc(if she is as successful as she claims to be). however, if she lands herself a good job with a foreign company, then everything might turn out to be great for her.it could turn out to be the best decision she ever makes!i think as long as she researches everything thoroughly, and is not looking through rose tinted glasses,why not give it a go?sometimes you just have to follow your instincts. other posters obviously agree and are enjoying their lives in poland.dont be so negative!!!
Wroclaw Boy
10 Mar 2012  #27
And why such negative view of Poland?

he lived in Poland for a few years and hated it, he never used to shut the hell up about how great the US was and all that crap.
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
10 Mar 2012  #28
Hopefully you'll both have a great time.

Regarding teaching English, I'd advise getting the best qualification possible and living in Warsaw. Private sector language lessons are in many ways a luxury product and out in the sticks far fewer people have money for them and since the best (only?) way to make a good living teaching is to teach in-company you'd need to be somewhere with a good concentration of large companies.

You move back to Poland, not only are you going to take several steps down in lifestyle,

If you can't live without Dean & Deluca or Harrods then maybe, but Warsaw (provided you have some money) is a decent place to live.

im of the opinion that the biggest regret can often be not trying.

Yes. Good luck if you move here.
OP Nanna 1 | 14
10 Mar 2012  #29
and living in inferior accommodation compared to what she is used to in nyc(if she is as successful as she claims to be).

What is that mean "inferior accommodations"? Are you suggesting apartments/flats in Warsaw are dungeons? I live in New York City, but I don't live in a glass house with gold door knobs, and I don't drive a Porsche to work. But if I do move back to Poland, I know for sure that I won't have to work at Biedronka either.

I mentioned Masuria because I wanted to be closer to the area for occasional weekend trips. I realize that most likely I would have to live and work in Warsaw.

If NYC has grown old for you........move to another state!

If I wanted to move to another state, I would not be on this forum discussing life in Poland.

Thank you for all the positive comments so far. :)
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,884
11 Mar 2012  #30
then everything might turn out to be great for her.it could turn out to be the best decision she ever makes!

yes, it could be the best decision she ever makes, but you could say that about any decision at any time. she came on this forum to ask for advice, and I'm giving it. saying, "go for it, it might be great," is NOT advice. it's wishing someone luck.

Hey, i can do that too. Hey pam, have a great day tomorrow, I hope everything works out for you! There.

dont be so negative!!!

someone that lives in NYC, a city most people dream of visiting, let alone living in, she's been in the USA for 20 years and claims to be very successful, and she's considering moving to a country almost nobody moves to. think about it.......negatives are sure to come out and i'm not going to sugar coat it just to avoid some flaming.

Where do you live fuzzy?

south east USA. why?

If you can't live without Dean & Deluca or Harrods then maybe, but Warsaw (provided you have some money) is a decent place to live.

Warsaw......New York City.

Warsaw.....New York City........

If I wanted to move to another state, I would not be on this forum discussing life in Poland.

Wrong. If you were so sure of yourself, you would have skipped the whole internet forum advice part and bought your plane ticket already. you're here because you have doubts.

as a matter of fact, you've already made it clear that you're worried about finding work for starters and mentioned ESL to see what we think of it. I already said what I had to say about it and plenty have agreed with me.

If you want advice from someone that will give it to you straight, send me a PM. I'm a Jersey native, have Polish family in Poland and the tri-state area, spent 4 years in Wroclaw teaching ESL (2007-2011) and married a (native) Polish girl. I don't hate Poland, I just know the realities of "here" vs. "there" and am fine with putting it out in the open. If you want to have more smoke blown up your a$$, well, keep reading posts from the cheerleaders on here.

and that's plain english.


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