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Would like to move back to Poland from New York after living in USA for 20 years.


markskibniewski  
11 Mar 2012 /  #31
I personally have not had the pleasure of visiting Warsaw yet I will in the next couple of years, but NYC is not what it used to be. It has become outrageously expensive to live there. I personelly work both there and in NJ as well and would choose not to work in NYC if possible.

I'm a Jersey native, have Polish family in Poland and the tri-state area, spent 4 years in Wroclaw teaching ESL (2007-2011) and married a (native) Polish girl.

Applause. I would like to hear more as my relatives are also in Poland about 70 miles northeast of Warsaw. I would love to here about the city or area sometime.
Ushatek  
11 Mar 2012 /  #32
Nanna

If you want to change the place to live and come back to your fatherland it may be an excellent idea, but you should do it methodically. Start searching a proper job now, when you are in New York, you are in comfortable position and feel no pressure.It`s not rather a good idea to go back to Poland without any plan and to start looking for a job there. It can take a few months to find a job in Poland nowadays.

So if you send some applications, receive any responses, you can check how much they can pay you- if less then 4000 zl netto/month , it`s not worth a shot. If they will propose you more than that I think you should try. So tell us about your job searching in Poland , what did you do?
OP Nanna  
11 Mar 2012 /  #33
someone that lives in NYC, a city most people dream of visiting, let alone living in, she's been in the USA for 20 years and claims to be very successful, and she's considering moving to a country almost nobody moves to.

Can you support that statement? "A country nobody moves to?" How did you get that? Did you read an article about how nobody is moving to Poland in 2012? Or is Poland a country that YOU wouldn't move to? I think that is the case my friend. It's your own personal opinion. And, while I respect your viewpoint, I don't agree with it. Not everyone who comes to the good old USA wants to stay here 'ya know. Especially when it comes to New York. It might look good in the movies, but in reality it is not what it's all cracked up to be.

One more thing, you are an American, I am Polish/American, there is a big difference on how we were raised and how we both view Poland. To you Poland is a foreign country, to me it's my homeland.

south east USA. why?

Where you live might be influencing the way your are formulating your opinions about life in Poland.

Thanks.
Jimmu  
11 Mar 2012 /  #34
My situation is quite different from yours. I'm retired, have no Polish heritage, am slowly learning pidgin Polish, moved here with my wife, a Polish native. We are living in a small village far from anything that would be considered a medium sized town in Southern California where I lived for forty years before coming here. That being said ....

I think I know enough about what you are going through to be able to say "Give it a try."
I agree with several other posters that you should try to find a job before you come over, and that teaching English is not a viable option. Knowing a subject and teaching a subject are two very different things.

Housing costs in Warsaw are outrageous compared to the rest of Poland, just like they are in New York City compared to the rest of New York.

Some things cost more, some things less and there is a different take on what is a necessity and what is a luxury.
The winters are very cold compared to So. Cal., but not bad compared to the US North East and Mid West.
The hardest thing to get used to is the cultural homogeneity. Everybody knows the saints days and the life history of THE Pope. Everybody knows that the "katastrofa" means Smolensk. Nobody questions why the shops are closed on Sunday. Why whiskey, vodka, and wine are in a special high security section of the store, but beer is stacked next to the soft drinks and mineral water. Something built 300 years ago may be historical, but something built 100 years ago is just old.

It will be either frightening or fascinating, and you'll never know which until you try.
I've found it all fascinating, I hope you will too!
OP Nanna  
11 Mar 2012 /  #35
The hardest thing to get used to is the cultural homogeneity

lol! that is funny and sweet...I can understand your frustration about the homogeneous way of thinking.

Thanks for your advice. I need to get a list of pros and cons, do my research, and then follow my instincts. And, yes, get a job offer. :)

So, far, I am reading good things about Poland in 2012, especially with the football games exposing Poland to the rest of the world and to foreign investments, which is good for Poland's economy.

If I do move, you guys will be the first to know. :))) Best regards to all of you.

Interesting blog about living in Poland. britishinpoland.com/blog/about-me/
Meathead  
11 Mar 2012 /  #36
Plan, plan, plan, think, think, think...just do it. Quit your job and move back to Poland. You have nothing to lose as I and other people have mentioned, you could always move back. The more you think and plan the less likely that you'll move back and than you'll get the shoulda coulda woulda's.
pip  
11 Mar 2012 /  #37
I think that a lot of people are way off with their assessments of Poland. I can give my husband as an example. He left Poland when he was 15 to move to Canada but always wanted to return. He grew up in a very nice area of Gdynia, in a pre war house and had a good life. Because his family were staunch anti communists and aided a few people during the strikes in Gdansk- his house was constantly being searched by the secret Police...so his family left.

He did highschool and university in Canada, gained experience in Canada --then we came back to Poland and have lived here for 10 years. I am Canadian but I have managed to start a business here which has taken off. My language is not perfect but people don't seem to mind as long as I make the effort.

Because my husband has worked in Canada he has that experience when dealing with international businesses. He has a leg up compared to his colleagues that have only worked in Poland. He is very successful in his job and we live a good life.

You have the language and you have the education--you will do well. My suggestion is to try to get something first from the U.S. and then move here. I have no doubt you will do well.

If you are interested -you can send me a private message with the sort of work you do and I can ask my husband to see if he knows of any companies that may be interested in hiring somebody with your experience.

I made the move. We packed four suitcases, sold all of our stuff in Canada and have been here for a total of 9 years. It is not like you are immigrating from a war torn 3rd world country and can't go back. If you find that you don't like it- return to the states--but at least you will know you gave it a try.

There are lots of expats that are living here permanently. It all depends on the job.
FUZZYWICKETS  
11 Mar 2012 /  #38
Or is Poland a country that YOU wouldn't move to? I think that is the case my friend.

I lived there for 4 years. Can YOU support that statement?

Nanna wrote:

Not everyone who comes to the good old USA wants to stay here 'ya know.

You've lived there for 20 years. I'm not following.

Where you live might be influencing the way your are formulating your opinions about life in Poland.

I'd say you're spot on with that. I've lived in the north, I've lived in the south. I've lived in Poland. Those experiences influence my opinions on Poland. It's that simple.

With that said, it brings me back to one of my previous statements. You've only lived in NYC so "where you live might be infuencing the way you are formulating your opinions" as well. You've lived in 1 state. There are 50. Think about that.

I need to get a list of pros and cons

which is what i'm trying to provide. you came on here for advice so why counter everything I have to say?

One more thing, you are an American, I am Polish/American, there is a big difference on how we were raised and how we both view Poland. To you Poland is a foreign country, to me it's my homeland.

Your homeland over 20 years ago.

A key difference here is that I've actually paid taxes in Poland, held a job, paid for overhead, dealt with Polish business people.....what adults do. You were taken care of by mom and dad, went to school, goofed off, maybe played a sport or two.....what kids do. Your view of Poland has expired. You know what it's like to be a kid in communist Poland. I know today's Poland and that's the topic at hand.

I could provide goods and bads about staying in NYC and going to Poland. But, when I read your OP, I made logical deductions and formulated opinions. If that's not what you want, if you just want more and more people on here to tell you "good luck" and "just give it a try!" then you're not here for advice, you're just looking for a pep rally. Feel free to PM me, you just might be surprised.
pip  
11 Mar 2012 /  #39
good grief- she said she was 35- she is not a child! I packed up my bags and moved here when I was 26. I also know what today's Poland is, right now this very second- I am willing to bet my advice probably suits her better.
FUZZYWICKETS  
11 Mar 2012 /  #40
I am willing to bet my advice probably suits her better.

Good. So what is your advice?
Vieslava  
11 Mar 2012 /  #41
pam: and living in inferior accommodation compared to what she is used to in nyc(if she is as successful as she claims to be).

What is that mean "inferior accommodations"? Are you suggesting apartments/flats in Warsaw are dungeons? I live in New York City, but I don't live in a glass house with gold door knobs, and I don't drive a Porsche to work.

*************
What is this obsession with presumed *inferior accommodations* in Poland???

1) I am a real estate agent here in the USA in the Washington, D.C. area. I can tell you from my personal professional experience that some rental homes are shockingly low quality and severely over-priced for what they offer in our current short sale/foreclosure market.

2) I would swap homes anytime with some of my relatives in Poland because they are simply gorgeous quality homes.

Nanna asked for an advice and opinion. Instead, some commentators here changed her thread into personal EGO trip. Every country and every state has its share of beautiful well designed homes and its share of ugly inferior homes.

Nanna, Poland is beautiful and Polish people are very generous and friendly (with a few exceptions, but exceptions can be found everywhere). Even if you decide to come back, it will be a great experience. What is one year in a lifetime?

Good luck to you :-)

A key difference here is that I've actually paid taxes in Poland, held a job, paid for overhead, dealt with Polish business people.....what adults do. You were taken care of by mom and dad, went to school, goofed off, maybe played a sport or two.....what kids do. Your view of Poland has expired. You know what it's like to be a kid in communist Poland. I know today's Poland and that's the topic at hand.

I could provide goods and bads about staying in NYC and going to Poland. But, when I read your OP, I made logical deductions and formulated opinions. If that's not what you want, if you just want more and more people on here to tell you "good luck" and "just give it a try!" then you're not here for advice, you're just looking for a pep rally. Feel free to PM me, you just might be surprised.

?????

What is wrong with wanting to go back and live for one year in Poland???
Since when one must own a business to visit a country of his/her ancestors? She may meet a successful Polish businessman and get married in Poland - her single years are over :-).

My daughter was born here in USA - currently a computer engineering student at Virginia Tech - and she wants to do internship in Poland ..... mostly because she loved her vacations in Poland and has only good memories of Poland.

Traveling is good, especially traveling for ancestral patriotic reasons.
FUZZYWICKETS  
11 Mar 2012 /  #42
What is wrong with wanting to go back and live for one year in Poland???

absolutely nothing. as a matter of fact, what is the point of this thread if after all, it's risk free? why even bother asking any questions or advice, just do it, it's only a year!

the OP obviously should just do it and stop wondering if it's actually the right decision.

there.
markskibniewski  
11 Mar 2012 /  #43
What is wrong with wanting to go back and live for one year in Poland???
Since when one must own a business to visit a country of his/her ancestors? She may meet a successful Polish businessman and get married in Poland - her single years are over :-).

There is nothing wrong with it at all. I don't think Fuzzy is saying that there is anything wrong with Poland. I think Fuzz is saying if you don't like the city move elsewhere first before diving in head first in another country (albeit her homeland) that has changed significantly since she has been there last. From what I have read on this forum it is cheaper to live in Poland but the pay scale is also severely reduced. It may be a shock to just move to Poland and try to get a job as some have suggested here. I think Fuzz is giving some very down to earth and common sense advice that I happen to agree with. If PO decides to go I wish her the best and stay in touch with the forum to let the rest of us know how you are fairing.
pam  
12 Mar 2012 /  #44
What is that mean "inferior accommodations"? Are you suggesting apartments/flats in Warsaw are dungeons

i dont think you quite understood what i was trying to say. i am not suggesting apartments in poland are dungeons, far from it!!the impression you give is that you are basically a successful business woman living in nyc. all i was trying to point out(obviously badly) is that you may not be able to afford the same standard of accommodation in poland that you are used to in nyc.
pip  
12 Mar 2012 /  #45
From what I have read on this forum it is cheaper to live in Poland but the pay scale is also severely reduced

depends what you do for a living.

pip: I am willing to bet my advice probably suits her better.

Good. So what is your advice?

She should go for it. what has she got to lose? Perhaps I have a different perspective because I am a military brat and have lived across Canada as well as a foreign country. It is not much to pack up your stuff for a year and come to Poland. She could put her things in a self storage for a year, move to Poland, test the waters and if she likes it- then she can return to the u.s. after a year and deal with all the things in storage. That is what we did- we were not certain if we were staying so we rented out our house for a year and once we knew where we wanted to be- we sold the house and had a huge yard sale and got rid of everything.
FUZZYWICKETS  
12 Mar 2012 /  #46
She should go for it. what has she got to lose?

first of all, that is not advice. the OP wasn't taking a poll when she created this thread, "Should I move to Poland, YES or NO?"

secondly, what has she got to lose? how about her job. sure, she's got a good job now (from what she says) but going to Poland means she would lose it.

thirdly, do you have any idea what it would cost to rent a storage space in NYC to store basically all her belongings, including furniture, appliances, etc.? it costs a fortune, especially when considering she'll be going from earning dollars (a strong currency) to zloty (a lousy currency).

depends what you do for a living.

again, this simply is a non answer. depends what you do for a living......sure, she could find a rich husband as well! is she going to arrive in Poland and be a director of some big department in a major corporation? stop thinking about this like, "well it depends if...." because it doesn't help the avg. 35 year old PolAm looking to return home. she wants to know what she can expect, not about some long shot unattainable possibilities.

it is not cheaper to live anywhere in Europe compared to the USA and yes, the pay scale will be reduced. compare what a middle manager earns in Poland vs. the USA, not to mention the lifestyle differences......there is no comparison. Avg. Susie coming from the USA will come to Poland and live like an Avg. Suzanna.

all i was trying to point out(obviously badly) is that you may not be able to afford the same standard of accommodation in poland that you are used to in nyc.

if you ask me, the apartment itself will be one of the easier things to adjust to. it's what's outside that apartment that makes it such a shock.

man, no more NYC pizza? ouch.
pip  
12 Mar 2012 /  #47
oh please. typical American behaviour thinking that everybody should adjust to your liking. Storage space- big deal. rental is an option, perhaps she has friends or family that would be willing to hold on to it for a year- if she doesn't than sell it. it is just stuff- and the important stuff she can take with.

35 year old, foreign education, bilingual, foreign experience. she has the cards stacked on her side. There are loads of American companies coming to Poland. My husband deals with them daily.

marry rich- that is such an ass thing to say. not everybody is looking for a man. And if that was a shot at me- yes, we are considered rich for Polish standards- but we haven't always been. I have been married for 13 years, right out of university when we were broke and with a baby. I know what it means to have no money and I know what it means to start at the bottom and work my way up- as does my husband--now we have success after working for it-not having it given to us---and we give back to our community.

Depending on what she does- I would say she could earn a minimum of 10,000 per month living in Warsaw. Bilingual, educated abroad and foreign experience. She should have no problem finding that.
FUZZYWICKETS  
12 Mar 2012 /  #48
oh please. typical American behaviour thinking that everybody should adjust to your liking.

i don't understand this statement.

marry rich- that is such an ass thing to say. not everybody is looking for a man.

what in the world are you talking about?! when did I suggest that? did you even read my post?

holy moly, reel yourself back in.

Depending on what she does- I would say she could earn a minimum of 10,000 per month living in Warsaw. Bilingual, educated abroad and foreign experience. She should have no problem finding that.

to just say "10,000 per month" is pretty bold. you don't even know what industry she's in and in all honesty, you don't know how successful she really is. do you know her salary in NYC? do you know what her education is in? to just throw that number out is puuuure speculation and like i said, you need to stop. she needs help, good advice that will help her make her decision and if she decides to go, better prepare her for arrival, not someone telilng her that Poland is all unicorns and rainbows.
Wroclaw Boy  
12 Mar 2012 /  #49
I would say she could earn a minimum of 10,000 per month living in Warsaw. Bilingual, educated abroad and foreign experience. She should have no problem finding that.

no way
JonnyM  
12 Mar 2012 /  #50
Warsaw......New York City.

Warsaw.....New York City........

Given the choice, I'd prefer Warsaw. A manageable size, lower cost housing, a much lower crime rate (you can walk safely down every street at any time of the day or night), fewer traffic problems and a more relaxed pace of life.

I would say she could earn a minimum of 10,000 per month living in Warsaw.

That's on the high side.

From what I have read on this forum it is cheaper to live in Poland but the pay scale is also severely reduced. It may be a shock to just move to Poland and try to get a job as some have suggested here.

This is all true.
pip  
12 Mar 2012 /  #51
I attended NY high school and college, got a Bachelor's degree and stellar NYC corporate experience.

this is what i am basing it on. In Warsaw- that is not outrageous.
markskibniewski  
12 Mar 2012 /  #52
10,000 per month living in Warsaw

Would barely pay for the rent on an avg 1 bedroom apartment in Manhattan. Actually I take that back it wouldn't it would be 11,668 for the rent. This is of course from a quick search online but I was just curious.
pip  
12 Mar 2012 /  #53
there is no question that Poland is cheaper than NYC- but my point is that she, in my opinion -based on my last post and her first- she could earn 10,000 plus per month. Of course, depending on what her profession is. Clearly an English teacher would never make that- but that is not what I am basing my opinion on. And- I hope she pm's me so I can help her and prove all of you "experts" wrong.
markskibniewski  
12 Mar 2012 /  #54
Listen I am in no way trying to offend anyone here, but her first post seemed more like a resume than asking for advice after reading further posts by OP. There is a wide range of colleges in Ny not to mention how broad the stellar NYC corporate experience statement was. Sounds to me like she is more of a secretary/personel assistant than a corporate executive.

Lets be honest with ourselves is a manager in a corporation going to ask for a teaching job if successful. Not trying to bellitle teachers in any way I feel thier job is harder by far. It is the pay scale that I am eluding to.

There s no right or wrong here. It is just advice. I am giving advice based on what I have read here and my personel experiences living here in USA that is all.
FUZZYWICKETS  
12 Mar 2012 /  #55
Would barely pay for the rent on an avg 1 bedroom apartment in Manhattan. Actually I take that back it wouldn't it would be 11,668 for the rent. This is of course from a quick search online but I was just curious.

Rich people live in Manhattan. NYC is made up of 5 boroughs, Manhattan obviously being the most expensive one. Cherry picking Manhattan as an example would be equivalent to finding the most expensive part of Warsaw and telling us how much apartments go for in Warsaw.

Oh, and I highly doubt the OP lives in Manhattan. My guess, she's a Brooklyn/Queens girl :)

Clearly an English teacher would never make that- but that is not what I am basing my opinion on.

oddly enough, that's the only job the OP has mentioned doing in Poland thus far.

Lets be honest with ourselves is a manager in a corporation going to ask for a teaching job if successful.

which is, yet again, why i am doubtful of her getting off the plane and walking into a 10K/month salary. all this talk about her "stellar corporate experience" we keep banging around, yet not a peep from the OP about just how extensive this experience really is.
markskibniewski  
12 Mar 2012 /  #56
FUZZYWICKETS

When anyone refers to NYC they are referring to Manhattan. No one that lives in Brooklyn /Queens says they live in NYC. They live in Brooklyn or Queens. And yes prices in Brooklyn/Queens are about 50 % cheaper than in the city. I agree OP probably lives in the Bronx or Queens. My parents grew up in the Bronx. There was a lovely Polish church there. My grandfather owned an apartment buildng there.

which is, yet again, why i am doubtful of her getting off the plane and walking into a 10K/month salary. all this talk about her "stellar corporate experience" we keep banging around, yet not a peep from the OP about just how extensive this experience really is.

Agreed
Vieslava  
12 Mar 2012 /  #57
all i was trying to point out(obviously badly) is that you may not be able to afford the same standard of accommodation in poland that you are used to in nyc.

Here you go again.

Did you see a typical $2,500-$3,000 per month apartment in Manhattan???
There is NOTHING to it. Simple rooms, no crown moldings or marble hallways and no elegant master baths, either. Yes, most likely you'll find a grand public lobby on the ground level to show off the building but not much to write home about in the private apartments.

You basically pay for the privilege of living in Manhattan, which granted has a few things to write home about, and the big city view from your window.

But your personal oasis??? Not so much.

man, no more NYC pizza? ouch.

Only if you consider *pizza*as food.
In my home pizza is NOT permitted any food status. Period. Shop ordered pizza is not very hygienically prepared, either. Pizza is a *food* served by LAZY mothers.

Stay on topic. It's not a food section.
pip  
12 Mar 2012 /  #58
I didn't say that quote above.

As for pizza being for lazy mothers. That is crap. we order out pizza and I am not lazy. I cook all my foods from scratch and often we make home made pizza together- but every so often I will order pizza.

unhygienic --so is everything that is manhandled in any shop anywhere in the world.

There are a few good pizza places in Warsaw- staying in NYC for the pizza is silly.
OP Nanna  
12 Mar 2012 /  #59
What is wrong with wanting to go back and live for one year in Poland???
Since when one must own a business to visit a country of his/her ancestors? She may meet a successful Polish businessman and get married in Poland - her single years are over :-).

I love how everyone is benevolently planning my future life Poland. It's very sweet. It's like listening to a large group of friends and family at the dinner table. Actually, while we're at it, why not find me a husband as well. Any takers? :)))
rozumiemnic  
12 Mar 2012 /  #60
Actually, while we're at it, why not find me a husband as well. Any takers? :)))

no Nanna don't do it!!!!

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